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i have List contains{a,b,c,at,h,c,bt} i like split into List<List<string>>{{a,b,c},{at,h,c},{bt}}; if particular strings contains "t" i need break that line how can i do this in linq?

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I dont think this type of thing is very suited for LINQ, but perhaps someone can concoct something. –  leppie Jan 13 '11 at 7:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, there's a horrible way of doing it:

int tCounter = 0;
var groups = sequence.GroupBy(x => x.Contains("t") ? ++tCounter : tCounter)
                     .Select(group => group.ToList())
                     .ToList();

or equivalently (but without the call to Select):

int tCounter = 0;
var groups = sequence.GroupBy(x => x.Contains("t") ? ++tCounter : tCounter,
                              (count, group) => group.ToList())
                     .ToList();

That relies on a side-effect within the GroupBy clause - which is a really bad idea. LINQ is designed around functional ideals, where queries shouldn't have side effects. You put side effects in the code which uses the query, not in the query itself. This will work, but I wouldn't advise it.

Here's a short but complete demonstration, just to prove it does actually work:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

public class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var input = new List<string>{"a","b","c","at","h","c","bt"};

        int tCounter = 0;
        var groups = input.GroupBy(x => x.Contains("t") ? ++tCounter : tCounter)
                          .Select(group => group.ToList())
                          .ToList();
        foreach (var list in groups)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", list));
        }
    }
}

Output:

a, b, c
at, h, c
bt

What we really need is a "Scan" (aka foldl, I believe - not sure) operator - like Aggregate, but providing a running aggregation. Then the scan could keep track of the current number of Ts as well as the current value, and the GroupBy could work on that.

It's not hard to write such an operator, and IIRC the Reactive Extensions System.Interactive assembly already contains one. You may want to use that instead of my horribly grotty hack. At that point you could actually write it reasonably elegantly in LINQ.

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Is this an example of a situation where it would be OK to downvote you to emphasize to the OP that they're asking for the wrong way to go about their problem? –  Gabe Jan 13 '11 at 7:19
1  
@Gabe: Well I'm not going to complain, but I do mention that the solution is horrible, so I don't think it's advocating bad practice. In fact, it says it's a bad idea and why. I'm not convinced that using LINQ is a really bad idea here - we just need an operator we don't currently have in the standard library. –  Jon Skeet Jan 13 '11 at 7:22
    
A nitpick, but I'm pretty sure that foldl is just the equivalent of LINQ's standard Aggregate method –  LukeH Jan 13 '11 at 8:56

I don't think it can be done with the built-in Linq methods (actually, it can... see other answers), but you can easily create your own extension method for this purpose:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Split<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> isSeparator)
{
    List<T> list = new List<T>();
    foreach(T item in source)
    {
        if (isSeparator(item))
        {
            if (list.Count > 0)
            {
                yield return list;
                list = new List<T>();
            }
        }
        list.Add(item);
    }

    if (list.Count > 0)
    {
        yield return list;
    }
}

And use it as follows:

var list = new[] { "a", "b", "c", "at", "h", "c", "bt" };
var result = list.Split(s => s.Contains("t"));
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There is a built-in extension method Aggregate which is exactly what you need.

var source = new List<string> { "a", "b", "c", "at", "h", "c", "bt" };
var result = source.Aggregate(new List<List<string>>(), (list, s) =>
    {
        if (list.Count == 0 || s.Contains('t')) list.Add(new List<string>());
        list.Last().Add(s);
        return list;
    });

The result is List<List<string>>.

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This problem doesn't scream LINQ to me. If you're asking for a LINQ answer as a mental exercise, that's something else, but here's how I'd solve it (using a plain old loop):

        List<List<string>> list = new List<List<string>>();
        List<string> sublist = new List<string>();
        foreach (string element in originalList)
        {
            if (element.Contains("t"))
            {
                list.Add(sublist);
                sublist = new List<string>();
            }
            sublist.Add(element);
        }
        list.Add(sublist);

Don't get me wrong, I abuse LINQ more than anyone. :)

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1  
@Sapph: I dispute your final claim. I've seen and committed some pretty hideous LINQ abuse... –  Jon Skeet Jan 13 '11 at 7:18
    
@Jon Skeet - I must admit my mouth was agape as I realized just what your solution was doing. :D –  Sapph Jan 13 '11 at 7:20
    
Yours is the only solution that returns empty sub-lists sometimes. –  Gabe Jan 13 '11 at 7:35
1  
@Gabe: LOL you tested all answers? So studious... –  Danny Chen Jan 13 '11 at 7:41
    
@The: I didn't actually test any of the answers; I just looked at them to understand how they work. –  Gabe Jan 13 '11 at 7:56

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