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Why is the output of this code :

#include <iostream>  
template<typename T> void f(T param) 
{ 
   std::cout << "General" << std::endl ; 
} 
template<> void f(int& param) 
{ 
   std::cout << "int&" << std::endl ; 
}  

int main() 
{   
  float x ;  f (x) ;   
  int y ; f (y) ;   
  int& z = y ; f (z) ; 
}  

is

General
General
General

The third one is surprizing because the function was specialized exactly for int&

Edit : I know that overloading might be a proper solution. I just want to learn the logic behind it.

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Maybe because const int& is preferred to int&? –  Septagram Jan 13 '11 at 7:07
    
@Septagram: const int& ? –  ali_bahoo Jan 13 '11 at 7:09
    
I don't know if it helps, but if you change the template to accept a T &, then both f(y) and f(z) call the int & version. –  Daniel Gallagher Jan 13 '11 at 7:15
    
@Daniel Gallagher: Then you have a compiler error with f(2);. Also the output off(y) is int&. –  ali_bahoo Jan 13 '11 at 7:21
2  
The best way is to use an overload void f(int& param) gotw.ca/publications/mill17.htm –  hansmaad Jan 13 '11 at 7:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The type of both the expression y and the expression z is int. A reference appearing in an expression won't keep reference type. Instead, the type of the expression will be the referenced type, with the expression being an lvalue.

So in both cases, T is deduced to int, and thus the explicit specialization is not used at all.

What's important to note (other than that you should really use overloading, as another guy said), is that you have a non-reference function parameter in your template. Before any deduction of T against the argument type is done, the argument type will be converted from arrays to a pointer to their first element (for functions, arguments will be converted to function pointers). So a function template with a non-reference function parameter doesn't allow for accurate deduction anyway.

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1  
+1 (and thanks for spotting the mistake in my own answer while I am at it) –  Matthieu M. Jan 13 '11 at 8:24

A reference is just an alias, not a type. So when you call f(z), it matches the first version with T=int, which is a better option that T=int&. If you change T to T&, then both int and int& arguments will call the second version.

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If I change T to T&, I have compiler error when f(2) or f("text") –  ali_bahoo Jan 13 '11 at 7:23
    
Change it to const. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 13 '11 at 7:25

I know it is not answer but, IMHO you can try this, with a trait like approach in a struct:

template<typename T>
struct value_traits
{
    static void print(){std::cout << "General" << std::endl ;} 
};

template<>
struct value_traits<const long>
{
    static void print(){std::cout << "const long" << std::endl ;} 
};

template<>
struct value_traits<std::vector<unsigned char> >
{
    static void print(){std::cout << "std::vector<unsigned char>" << std::endl ; }
};

template<>
struct value_traits<const int>
{
       static void print(){std::cout << "const int" << std::endl ;} 
};
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