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I'm trying to do a sort on the following data.

<contents>
   <content>
      <id>
      <text>
   </content>
   <relatedcontent>
      <id>
      <text>
   </relatedcontent>
</contents>

This is just sample data simplified, but you get the idea. Its two different named nodes that contains the same structure. Right now I have created two different templates to treat the content and relatedcontent separetly, but then sorting is also done separetly. Is there an easy way to sort both content and relatedcontent on ids? Lets say the <text> contains a text. How could I then list all the <text>-elements of content and relatedcontent sorted by id?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a solution that is simpler, more in the spirit of XSLT and more general and flexible. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 13 '11 at 13:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try something like this

<xsl:foreach select="//content | //relatedcontent">
  <xsl:sort select="id" />
  <xsl:value-of select="text" />
</xsl:foreach>

I guess the solution lies in the fact that you "join" //content and //relatedcontent into a single node-set using the union operator |

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Im not using the foreach, im using it in a template, but that works perfect too! –  Erik Jan 13 '11 at 9:57
4  
It's not good to use a path with starting // operator when the schema is well known. –  user357812 Jan 13 '11 at 13:35
2  
@Alejandro: As I do not know the schema well, I made a simple example. I think for the purpose of the answer it was good enough. –  Lukas Eder Jan 13 '11 at 13:36
    
Why was this downvoted? –  Lukas Eder Jan 13 '11 at 13:46
    
+1 for simplicity and ease of application inside of a larger template. –  Kamil Szot Jan 13 '11 at 23:52

This transformation shows how this can be done:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
  <contents>
   <xsl:apply-templates>
    <xsl:sort select="id" data-type="number"/>
   </xsl:apply-templates>
  </contents>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="content">
   Content Here
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="relatedcontent">
   Relatedcontent Here
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document (corrected to be well-formed):

<contents>
    <content>
        <id>3</id>
        <text/>
    </content>
    <relatedcontent>
        <id>2</id>
        <text/>
    </relatedcontent>
</contents>

the wanted, correctly sorted result is produced:

<contents>
   Relatedcontent Here

   Content Here
 </contents>

Do note:

  1. No use of <xsl:for-each>. Only <xsl:apply-templates> is used.

  2. No use of the XPath union operator (yes, it is called the union operator, nothing to do with pipes).

  3. If in the future a third element to be sorted on id is added to the XML document, this transformation will still work without any changes.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Better answer. –  user357812 Jan 13 '11 at 13:44
1  
Technically you're right. But I guess it's easier for an XSL-beginner to go with <xsl:for-each/> in most cases. –  Lukas Eder Jan 13 '11 at 14:00
3  
@Lucas-Eder: It may feel easier for certain type of beginner to use <xsl:for-each>. However teaching a beginer to use <xsl:for-each> and not showing him that <xsl:apply-templates> is much more powerful and universal -- this is plain wrong. Not to mention that there are other types of beginners that have no prior programming experience and such people usually learn <xsl:apply-templates> most naturally. Not to mention that the OP himself mentioned that he is not using <xsl:for-each> –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 13 '11 at 14:46
3  
hehe "plain wrong"... I like that. Is that you in this comic strip: xkcd.com/386 ? ;-) Seriously, a quick grep over our large-scale web-application (600'000 users, 2'000+ concurrent sessions at any time) shows me that there are about 1263 <xsl:foreach/> loops. I guess we are what you consider a certain type of beginner... But there. I +1 you for your "universal" answer. –  Lukas Eder Jan 13 '11 at 16:05
    
@Lukas-Eder: The size of an application generally does not correlate with the XSLT experience of its developers. I have seen much larger applications with a "beginner" XSLT quality, so your fact comes as no surprize. Because of these facts we are even more obliged to explain to people what XSLT really is. As for the XKCD cartoon, yes, this is a nice one that I have known for a long time. No, I am not the dude in the picture, I will not tell you how to grow turnip. I am not a "know everything" type, just good at a few things and nothing else. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 13 '11 at 16:21

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