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I have a strange problem implementing pl/sql procedure.
My procedure has four varchar input parameter, and extracts from a table an id value with a query like this:

SELECT ID INTO idvar FROM TABLE T WHERE T.NAME = pn AND T.SUR = ln;

In this table, name and sur are unique key. So for a couple of input parameter (pn,ln), I expect to obtain only one row, but isn't so. Indeed, it seems that only the first condition processed, and the second doesn't.

In my table I have, this test row:

ID | NAME | SUR
1  | JO   | SOME THING
2  | JO   | OTHER ONE
3  | BO   | SOME THING

If in my procedure I pass

('JO', 'SOME THING')

I obtain ID: 1 and 2.
But if I pass values

('BO', 'SOME THING')

i obtain only ID 3.

Clearly, with previous query I obtained error ORA-01422, so I substitute it with a cursor definition first, and a "for row in (query) " later:

CURSOR C IS
SELECT ID FROM TABLE T WHERE T.NAME = pn AND T.SUR = ln;

This behavior is strange for me, in fact if I exec only query from sqlplus or toad, i obtain correct result.

Oracle version is 8.1.

Thanks in advance

#

This is my procedure (I Hope you don't find mismatch, because I changed name of objects):

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE myproc (
pn in VARCHAR2,
ln in VARCHAR2,
other in VARCHAR2,
datarif in VARCHAR2
) 
AS
  idT    NUMBER;
  idST NUMBER;
  idSE    NUMBER;

  CURSOR C IS 
    SELECT ID
    FROM TABLE T
    WHERE 
    T.NAME = pn AND T.SUR = ln;

BEGIN

     for x in ( SELECT ID
         FROM TABLE T
        WHERE 
        T.NAME = pn AND T.SUR = ln )
     loop 
       DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('INFOR:' || x.ID);
     end loop;


     open C;
     loop
       fetch C into idT;
        exit when C%NOTFOUND;
        DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('INLOOP:ID='||idT);
 end loop;
 close C;

 DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line ( 'OUTLOOP: ID='||idT );


  EXCEPTION
    WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN
     NULL;
    WHEN TOO_MANY_ROWS THEN 
      RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR(-20001, 'Exact Fetch Returned many Rows');  
    WHEN OTHERS THEN
     DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('ERROR');
     ROLLBACK;
 RAISE;

END myproc;
/

Thank you

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3  
Can you poste the complete procedure and the call of the procedure (with context)? –  Tim Krueger Jan 13 '11 at 9:45
    
I write procedure on original post. –  sangi Jan 13 '11 at 10:16
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Maybe there's a clash between your parameters and fields of the table?

Change it by adding the name of your procedure as scope for your parameters:

 T.NAME = myproc.pn AND T.SUR = myproc.ln
share|improve this answer
    
Adding scope seems to be solution. Thank you very much. –  sangi Jan 13 '11 at 10:47
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"... because I changed name of objects"

Maybe some of your parameters have the same names as some columns.

For example if your procedure looked like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE myproc (
pn in VARCHAR2,
sur in VARCHAR2,
other in VARCHAR2,
datarif in VARCHAR2
)
...
SELECT ID INTO idvar FROM TABLE T WHERE T.NAME = pn AND T.SUR = sur;
...

you would get TOO_MANY_ROWS error because the condition "T.SUR = sur" would have the same effect as "T.SUR = T.SUR".

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, it is so!!! Thanks –  sangi Jan 15 '11 at 8:42
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I tested your first statement with your example table! And on my machine it works. But that is an Oracle 10g database.

Edit: I re-writed your procedure and on my machine that version works well!

create or replace
PROCEDURE myproc (
  pn in VARCHAR2,
  ln in VARCHAR2,
  other in VARCHAR2,
  datarif in VARCHAR2
) 
AS
  idvar    NUMBER;
BEGIN
  SELECT ID INTO idvar FROM TEST T WHERE T.NAME = pn AND T.SUR = ln;
  DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line ( 'OUTLOOP: ID='||idvar );
END myproc;
share|improve this answer
    
Adding ROWNUM=1 is not very good advice. If the query is returning multiple rows when it shouldn't, it probably indicates an error in coding (which seems to be the case per accepted answer). So simply working around it by "randomly" picking one of the rows to work with is not a good solution. –  Dave Costa Jan 13 '11 at 14:55
    
@Dave Costa: You're right! I removed the dirty solution. But sometimes for testing I will use it again ... ;) –  Tim Krueger Jan 13 '11 at 15:13
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