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this syntax returns an array with a word key.

(?<item>\w+)  

ex. $array['item']



I want the return value in this form but I want to search for a word that may or may not contain parentheses (with values in between).

"hello"
or
"hello(some text and line breaks)"



What is the syntax for this?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
\w+(?:\([^)]*\))?

will match words that can optionally be directly followed by a parenthesized text. Nested parentheses are not allowed.

\w+    # Match alnum characters
(?:    # Match the following (non-capturing) group:
 \(    # literal (
 [^)]* # any number of characters except )
 \)    # literal )
)?     # End of group; make it optional
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I believe that (?: actually denotes a non-capturing group, rather than an optional one. The optionality is determined solely from the ? at the end; the initial ?: simply causes the regex engine not to make this group available as a backreference (which is more efficient when you're not going to refer to it as such). One could omit this character pair without changing the boolean matching behaviour of the regex. –  Andrzej Doyle Jan 13 '11 at 11:34
    
@Andrzey: I know; I just mentioned it there to show that all that follows will be optional (which you would otherwise only find out at the end). I admit it is misleading. Will clarify. –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 13 '11 at 11:46
    
Perfect! Thank you for the code & and the explanation. –  Zebra Jan 13 '11 at 11:49
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hello(\(\))?

or if your regex engine defaults parentheses to normal character

hello\(()\)?
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This just matches hello or hello() but nothing else. There is nothing in the regex to account for the fact that there might be something between the parentheses. –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 13 '11 at 11:48
    
i answered this question and afterwards he editted his question to allow for text between the parentheses –  Robokop Jan 13 '11 at 15:15
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