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I've been using the following bit of code without any issues till it finally landed on a windows server and decided to produce an error:

$date = date('F d, Y', $data->e_date)
date($time_format, strtotime($date.' '.$data->e_time))

*(e_date is stored like this: "1293559200", and e_time is stored like this: "18:00")*

The error is as such:

date() [function.date]: Windows does not support dates prior to midnight (00:00:00), January 1, 1970 in ...

To my understanding this is because I am using strtotime within the date function. So what I'm wondering is what is an elegant method of solving or rewriting this?

Should I be feeding the entire strtotime in a new variable, i.e. $newdate and then back to date in that form, or otherwise?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
What version of PHP are you running on this Windows server? Windows has supported the full 32-bit date range since PHP version 5.1.0... you might like to try upgrading... even 5.1.0 is over 5 years old now! –  Mark Baker Jan 13 '11 at 14:30
    
Hi Mark, on PHP 5.3. Still not sure how to handle this one the best way.. –  Noel Tock Jan 13 '11 at 16:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are using UNIX TIMESTAMP it will not work properly in windows os systems.

Try to convert it using this function. convert 20031230233029 to 30/12/2003 23:30:59

function mysql_timestamp_para_humano($dt) {
    $yr=strval(substr($dt,0,4));
    $mo=strval(substr($dt,4,2));
    $da=strval(substr($dt,6,2));
    $hr=strval(substr($dt,8,2));
    $mi=strval(substr($dt,10,2));
    $se=strval(substr($dt,12,2)); 
    return date("d/m/Y H:i:s", mktime ($hr,$mi,$se,$mo,$da,$yr));
}

or this one

function timestamp_para_humano($ts) {
    $d=getdate($ts);
    $yr=$d["year"];
    $mo=$d["mon"];
    $da=$d["mday"];
    $hr=$d["hours"];
    $mi=$d["minutes"];
    $se=$d["seconds"];
    return date("d/m/Y", mktime($hr,$mi,$se,$mo,$da,$yr));
}

or you can try to convert the unix timestamp to mysql timestamp wth this another function

function timestamp_para_mysql_timestamp($ts) {
    $d=getdate($ts);
    $yr=$d["year"];
    $mo=$d["mon"];
    $da=$d["mday"];
    $hr=$d["hours"];
    $mi=$d["minutes"];
    $se=$d["seconds"];
    return sprintf("%04d%02d%02d%02d%02d%02d",$yr,$mo,$da,$hr,$mi,$se);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that Fernando, so if I did use this function, the entire script wouldn't work in a regular environment anymore (i.e. apache, sql, etc..)? –  Noel Tock Jan 13 '11 at 14:19
    
perhaps you can add a structure to control the flow of your code, something like, if plataform == linux execute this linux code otherwise execute windows code. Look about get_browser(null, true) function.. Still working, you just pay attention where you are using the function to convert.. –  B4NZ41 Jan 13 '11 at 14:26

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