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I have 2 identical tables: user_id, name, age, date_added. USER_ID column may contain multiple duplicate IDs.

Need to merge those 2 tables into 1 with the following condition. If there are multiple records with identical 'name' for the same user then need to keep only the LATEST (by date_added) record. This script will be used with MSSQL 2005, but would also appreciate if somebody comes up with version that does not use ROW_NUMBER(). Need this script to reload a broken table once, performance is not critical.

example:

table1:

1,'john',21,01/01/2010

1,'john',15,01/01/2005

1,'john',71,01/01/2001

table2:

1,'john',81,01/01/2007

1,'john',15,01/01/2005

1,'john',11,01/01/2008

result:

1,'john',21,01/01/2010

UPDATE: I think that I've found my own solution. It is based on an answer for my previous question given by Larry Lustig and Joe Stefanelli.

with tmp2 as ( SELECT * FROM table1 UNION
SELECT * FROM table2 )

SELECT * FROM tmp2 c1 WHERE (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM tmp2 c2 WHERE c2.user_id = c1.user_id AND c2.name = c1.name AND c2.date_added >= c1.date_added) <= 1

Could you please help me to convert this query to the one without 'WITH' clause?

share|improve this question
1  
Please post the code you have written so far. People generally do not like to just write your code for you. As it is, this is a work description, not a question. –  Mitch Wheat Jan 13 '11 at 14:38
    
I am still working on it. Do not have good working solution yet. Will definitely post it here if I will come up with one before somebody else will post their own here. –  myforums Jan 13 '11 at 14:42
    
begin with writing a select statement that returns the unique user ids and maximum dates - this is straightforward group by - then wrap that into an insert statement. –  Randy Jan 13 '11 at 14:46
    
Why the requirement to avoid row_number if you are only running it once and it will be on a 2005 server? –  Martin Smith Jan 13 '11 at 14:55
    
@MArtin: There is no firm requirement not to use row_number, but I like to learn ways how to construct some complex queries by using a combination of basic SELECT statements. –  myforums Jan 13 '11 at 15:05

3 Answers 3

Here's a variant of @Andomar's answer:

; with all_users as 
    (
    select  *
    from    table1 u1
    union all
    select  *
    from    table2 u2
    )
, ranker as (
     select  *, 
     rank() over (partition by userid order by recordtime) as [r]
)
select * from ranker where [r] = 1
share|improve this answer

Just in the interests of giving a different approach...

WITH distinctlist
     As (SELECT user_id,
                name
         FROM   table1
         UNION
         SELECT user_id,
                name
         FROM   table2)
SELECT C.*
FROM   distinctlist d
       CROSS APPLY (SELECT TOP 1 *
                    FROM   (SELECT TOP 1 *
                            FROM   table1
                            WHERE  user_id = d.user_id
                                   AND name = d.name
                            ORDER  BY date_added DESC
                            UNION ALL
                            SELECT TOP 1 *
                            FROM   table1
                            WHERE  user_id = d.user_id
                                   AND name = d.name
                            ORDER  BY date_added DESC) T
                    ORDER  BY date_added DESC) C  
share|improve this answer

You could use not exists, like:

; with all_users as 
        (
        select  *
        from    table1 u1
        union all
        select  *
        from    table2 u2
        )
select  *
from    all_users u1
where   not exists  
        (
        select  *
        from    all_users u2
        where   u1.name = u2.name
                and u1.record_time < u2.record_time
        )

If the database doesn't support CTE's, expand all_users in the two places it is used.

P.S. If there are only three columns, and no more, you could use an even simpler solution:

select  name
,       MAX(record_time)
from    (
        select  *
        from    table1 u1
        union all
        select  *
        from    table2 u2
        ) sub
group by
        name
share|improve this answer
    
Something is wrong with the 1st solution. I think that 'where' should have at lest u1.user_id=u2.user_id and something else. The 2nd solution is not good, because it does not select AGE. My real table has more columns than I listed in description. –  myforums Jan 13 '11 at 15:12
    
@myforums: You're right, answer edited –  Andomar Jan 13 '11 at 15:59

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