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while(some_condition){  
    if(FIRST)  
    {   
        do_this;  
    }  
    else  
    {  
        do_that;  
    }
}

In my program the possibility of if(FIRST) succeeding is about 1 in 10000. Can there be any alternative in C/C++ such that we can avoid checking the condition on every iteration inside the while loop with the hope of seeing a better performance in this case.

Ok! Let me put in some more detail. i am writing a code for a signal acquisiton and tracking scheme where the state of my system will remain in TRACKING mode more often that ACQUISITION mode.

while(signal_present)  
{    
    if(ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED)  
    {     
        do_tracking();  // this functions can change the state from TRACKING to ACQUISITION  
    }    
    else  
    {    
        do_acquisition();  // this function can change the state from ACQUISITION to TRACKING  
    }     
}    

So what happens here is that the system usually remains in tracking mode but it can enter acquisition mode when tracking fails but is not a common occurrence.( Assume the incoming data to be infinite in number. )

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2  
Is FIRST a loop invariant? –  Frank Jan 13 '11 at 15:46
3  
Given modern CPU architectures and performance, any possible optimisations you could do will probably save less time over the entire lifetime of the software than it has taken me to write and post this comment. –  JeremyP Jan 13 '11 at 16:27
2  
Is it just me, or does anyone else get the feeling that about 25% of C/C++ questions here on SO concern some pointless micro-optimisation that the OP imagines will be significant even though they have never timed their code? –  David Heffernan Jan 13 '11 at 16:52
1  
@David: Judging from all the idiotic application and kernel code with ugly gcc __builtin_expect nonsense in it, I feel this problem extends way beyond the boundaries of SO... –  R.. Jan 13 '11 at 19:06
1  
@Meeir: Have you profiled the code?? Where does the profile say the bottleneck is? –  Thomas Matthews Jan 13 '11 at 20:47
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10 Answers

The performance cost of a single branch is not going to be a big deal. The only thing you really can do is put the most likely code first, save on some instruction cache. Maybe. This is really deep into micro-optimization.

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1  
+1 for "really deep into micro-optimization" –  Kiril Kirov Jan 13 '11 at 15:45
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There is no particularly good reason to try to optimize this. Almost all modern architectures incorporate branch predictors. These speculate that a branch (an if or else) will be taken essentially the way it has been in the past. In your case, the speculation will always succeed, eliminating all overhead. There are non-portable ways to hint that a condition is taken one way or another, but any branch predictor will work just as well.

One thing you might want to do to improve instruction-cache locality is to move do_that out of the while loop (unless it is a function call).

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The GCC has a __builtin_expect “function” that you can use to indicate to the compiler which branch will likely be taken. You could use it like this:

if(__builtin_expect(FIRST, 1)) …

Is this useful? I have no idea. I have never used it, never seen it used (except allegedly in the Linux kernel). The GCC documentation actually discourages its usage in favour of using profiling information to achieve a more reliable metric.

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1  
It's used all over the place in Linux and GNU software, and serves no purpose except to obfuscate code. The worst thing is that they tend to #define LIKELY(x) __builtin_expect((x)!=0, 1) and then write if(LIKELY(condition)) which wrongly reads "if the condition is likely" in plain English predicate notation, confusing the hell out of anyone who hasn't seen the idiom before. –  R.. Jan 14 '11 at 1:46
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On recent x86 processor systems, final execution speed will barely rely on source code implementation.

You can have a look at this page http://igoro.com/archive/fast-and-slow-if-statements-branch-prediction-in-modern-processors/ to see amount the optimization that occurs inside the processor.

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1  
+1, that was a very interesting read ,Didier. –  Moo-Juice Jan 13 '11 at 16:13
    
Your first sentence is completely out of touch with reality. In testing the naive algorithm for strstr, I was able to vary the performance by 50% or more by making seemingly-meaningless variations to the loop counters, choice of mix of index/pointer notation, etc. This was on gcc 4.x and an Atom cpu. –  R.. Jan 14 '11 at 1:49
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If you don't know when "FIRST" will be true, then no.

The issue is whether FIRST is time consuming or not; maybe you could evaluate FIRST before the loop (or part of it) and just test the boolean.

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I'd change moonshadow's code a little bit to

while( some_condition )
{
   do_that;
   if( FIRST )
   {
     do_this; // overwrite what you did earlier.
   }
}
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this doesn't help a bit... –  RvdK Jan 13 '11 at 15:52
    
You're probably right.. This question is pretty difficult to answer without even knowing what kind of variable FIRST is. –  Sandro Jan 13 '11 at 15:54
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Based on your new information, I'd say something like the following:

while(some_condition)
{
  while(ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED)
  {
    do_tracking();
  }
  if (some_condition)
    while(!ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED)
    {
      do_acquisition();
    }
}

The point is that the ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED state must include the some_condition information to a certain extent (i.e. it will break out of the inner loops if some_condition is false - hence there is a chance to break out of the outer loop)

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Ok. I will try this out and see if it has an improvement over the old code. Thanks –  Mir Jan 13 '11 at 16:15
    
This doesn't look equivalent. What if some_condition changes in the first inner loop, but ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED doesn't? –  Steve Jessop Jan 13 '11 at 18:08
    
@Steve, which is why I said that "ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED state must include the some_condition information".... –  Nim Jan 13 '11 at 23:04
    
@Nim: If some_condition is incorporated into ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED, how can it being false cause ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED to be false (to break the first inner loop as needed), and also case !ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED to be false (to break the second loop as needed)? Some kind of horrible macro without enough parens, so that the ! only binds to the part of ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED that's separate from some_condition? –  Steve Jessop Jan 13 '11 at 23:13
    
@Steve, I used !ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED to indicate the other case, it doesn't mean it's the literal not of the first condition, and we're making assumptions about exactly what ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED. I mean, there is very simple boolean logic at play here - if the AS condition is updated at each function call (apparently it could be), then what's so difficult about incorporating another boolean in to the AS flag? Somebody above has a similar answer with added an extra && which is totally redundant, you only need to check one bool as long as you are careful about how it is updated. –  Nim Jan 13 '11 at 23:31
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This is a classic in optimization. You should avoid putting conditionals within loops if you can. This code:

while(...)
{
    if( a )
    {
       foo();
    }
    else
    {
       bar();
    }
}

is often better to rewrite as:

if( a )
{
    while(...)
    {
        foo();
    }
}
else
{
    while(...)
    {
        bar();
    }
}

It's not always possible though, and you should always when you try to optimize something measure the performance before and after.

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There is not much more useful optimizing you can do with your example.

The call / branch to the do_this and do_that may negate any savings you earned by optimizing an if-then-else statement.

One of the rules of performance optimizing is to reduce branches. Most processors prefer to execute sequential code. They can take a chunk of sequential code and haul it into their caches. Branching interrupts this pleasantry and may cause a complete reload of the instruction cache (which loses valuable execution time).

Before you micro-optimize at this level, review your design to see if you can:

  1. Eliminate unnecessary branching.
  2. Split up code so it fits into the cache.
  3. Organize the data to reduce fetches from memory or hard drive.

I'm sure that the above steps will gain you more performance than optimizing your posted loop.

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If this test is really consuming significant time compared to the implementation of do_aquisition, then you might get a boost by having a function table:

typedef void (*trackfunc)(void);
trackfunc tracking_action[] = {do_acquisition, do_tracking};
while (signal_present)
{
   tracking_action[ACQUISITION_STATE]();
}

The effects of these kinds of manual optimizations are very dependent on the platform, the compiler, and the optimization settings.

You will most likely get a much greater performance gain by spending your time measuring and tuning the do_aquisition and do_tracking algorithms.

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Your nested while() loops are going to do just as many executions of the ACQUISITION_SUCCEEDED test as the OP's original. –  caf Jan 14 '11 at 5:45
    
true - removed. –  AShelly Jan 14 '11 at 17:39
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