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var com = from exam1 in timeTable.Exams
          from exam2 in timeTable.Exams
          where (exam1 != exam2)
          select new List<Exam> { exam1, exam2 };

timeTable is a list of Exams

How can i get com to be distinct no matter what the order of the exams are that it contains. I think it is doing permutations now i need only distinct combinations.

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Could you add an example? –  SharePoint Newbie Jan 13 '11 at 16:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
var exams = timeTable.Exams.ToList();

var com = exams.Select(x => exams.Where(y => exams.IndexOf(y) > exams.IndexOf(x))
    .Select(z => new List<Exam> {x, z}))
    .SelectMany(x => x);
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Just fix the typo on Line 2, it should be List<string> –  SharePoint Newbie Jan 13 '11 at 16:56
    
I like how simple you keep the code and still maintain brevity –  Gary L Cox Jr Jan 13 '11 at 16:56
    
I think this is O(n^2) when O(n) is possible. –  jason Jan 13 '11 at 16:58

If you can implement a comparison such as IComparable<Exam> (which could, for example, compare based on a key field such as ExamId), you could possibly do it like this (showing example using integers)

int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

var query = from item1 in array
            from item2 in array
            where (item1.CompareTo(item2) < 0)
            select new Tuple<int, int>(item1, item2);

foreach (Tuple<int, int> tuple in query)
    Console.WriteLine("{0}\t{1}", tuple.Item1, tuple.Item2);

Without implementing an interface, the same logic could be expressed as a Func<> inline or declared seperately, depending on how complicated the logic might be.

Func<int, int, int> itemComparer = (x, y) => x.CompareTo(y);
// in your case, perhaps 
// Func<Exam, Exam, int> examComparer = (exam1, exam2) => exam1.Id.CompareTo(exam2.Id);

var query = from item1 in array
            from item2 in array
            where itemComparer(item1, item2) < 0
            select new Tuple<int, int>(item1, item2);

Otherwise, you might consider going by indexes and only looking at item2 when its position within the sequence is greater than item1.

int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

var query = from item1 in array.Select((item, index) => new { item, index })
            from item2 in array.Select((item, index) => new { item, index })
            where (item1.index < item2.index)
            select new Tuple<int, int>(item1.item, item2.item);

foreach (Tuple<int, int> tuple in query)
    Console.WriteLine("{0}\t{1}", tuple.Item1, tuple.Item2);
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It's not always possible to define a linear ordering in any pratical way. –  jason Jan 13 '11 at 17:02

First define a class that represents an unordered tuple:

class UnorderedTuple<T1, T2> {
    public T1 Item1 { get; set; }
    public T2 Item2 { get; set; }
    public UnorderedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2) {
        this.Item1 = item1;
        this.Item2 = item2;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj) {
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) {
            return true;
        }
        UnorderedTuple<T1, T2> instance = obj as UnorderedTuple<T1, T2>;
        if (instance == null) {
            return false;
        }
        return (this.Item1.Equals(instance.Item1) &&
                this.Item2.Equals(instance.Item2)) ||
               (this.Item1.Equals(instance.Item2) &&
                this.Item2.Equals(instance.Item1)
               );
    }

    public override int GetHashCode() {
        return this.Item1.GetHashCode() ^ this.Item2.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Then, as an example:

int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

var pairs = from item1 in array
            from item2 in array
            where item1 != item2
            select new UnorderedTuple<int, int>(item1, item2);

var distinct = pairs.Distinct();
foreach (var item in distinct) {
    Console.WriteLine("{{{0}, {1}}}", item.Item1, item.Item2);
}

Now you will only see the pair {1, 2} once. Note that

Console.WriteLine(distinct.Count());

outputs 36 which is correct because there are 9 * 8 / 2 = 72 / 2 = 36 unique combinations (9 * 8 represents the number of ordered pairs with distinct elements, and we divide by 2 to get the number of unordered pairs).

For your specific case:

var com = (from exam1 in timeTable.Exams
           from exam2 in timeTable.Exams
           where (exam1 != exam2)
           select new UnorderedTuple<Exam, Exam>(exam1, exam2)
          ).Distinct();
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You could try this:

var com = exams
          .Select(i => new {Head = new [] {i}, Tail = exams.SkipWhile(j => j != i).Skip(1)})
          .Select(l => l.Head.Join(l.Tail, x => 0, x => 0, (a,b) => new {a,b}))
          .SelectMany(l => l);

How this works: (for sequence 1,2,3,4)
Step 1: Segregate the input sequence into a head list and a tail list. A head list will always contain one element and the tail list will contain elements after the head element.
(result: {[1],[2,3,4]}, {[2],[3,4]}, {[3], [4]}, {[], []})
Step 2: Join the head and the tail lists.
(result: [[1,2],[1,3], [1,4]], [[2,3],[2,4]], [[3,4]])
Step 3: Flatten the collection

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Something like this?

var array = timeTable.Exams.ToArray();
var twoTuples = from index1 in Enumerable.Range(0, array.Length)
                from index2 in Enumerable.Range(i, array.Length - i)
                select Tuple.Create(array[index1], array[index2]);

(Of course, you can replace the tuple with an anonymous type or a List<Exam> if necessary, but I thought this was clearer).

If you don't want (x, x), one way would be to add a where index1 != index2 clause, or alternatively, change the ranges.

Also, if you only want "distinct" tuples (the sequence contains duplicates), you can add a .Distinct() call at the end. This will work fine since the Tuple<,> type overrides Equals and GetHashCode sensibly.

Advantages:

  1. Doesn't require any intrinsic comparability of the source items.
  2. Doesn't needlessly consider and then reject combinations.

Drawback:

This is just a fancy way of writing a nested for-loop with indices. Focuses on indices rather than on items, so it is debatably not very LINQy.

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