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Notice how these strings of text have the word "GARNSEY" declared twice:

"GARNSEY B R & D B GARNSEY"
"GARNSEY B R & D GARNSEY"

Now it can be D GARNSEY (no middle initial) or D B GARNSEY (includes middle initial) but I need to know if GARNEY is mentioned because that means last name is mentioned twice, once at beginning and once at end.

According to the book JavaScript Programmer's Reference:

"You can repeat the search for that exact symbol throughout the pattern...You can do this using \1 . Using \1 refers to the result of the first grouped expression."

Ok, so I try to "save" the result of the first group \w{1,})\1 and then I try to reuse it at the end, trying to also check if there's a middle name or not:

 /^(\w{1,})\1\s\w{1,}((?:\s\w{1,})?)+\s+&\s+\w{1,}\s(((?:\s\w{1,})?)+)\1$/;

Yet the JavaScript interpreter alerts "failed" with the below simple test:

(function(){
 var checkChar = function(txt){
 var regex = /^(\w{1,})\1\s\w{1,}((?:\s\w{1,})?)+\s+&\s+\w{1,}\s(((?:\s\w{1,})?)+)\1$/;

  (regex.test(txt)) ? alert('passed') : alert('failed');

 }

 checkChar("GARNSEY B R & D B GARNSEY");
})()

Am I misunderstanding the purpose of \1 and is there any solution to do what I am trying to do using a regular expression, as shown above? Thanks for response.

share|improve this question
    
That's not a simple test. This is: /(\w+) \w \1/.test( "foo h foo" ); //true. You've simply made an error in your RegExp. You have not rigorously-enough defined your problem for me to be sure as to what input might be expected and what you are trying to accomplish. –  Phrogz Jan 13 '11 at 16:48
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Remove the \1 at the beginning of the regexpr. After that it will still not report pass, but that is probably some other error in you regexpr. I tried to simplify your code to do more or less the same:

(function(){
 var checkChar = function(txt){
var regex = /^(\w+)(\s\w+)+\s+&\s+(\w+\s)+\1$/;

  (regex.test(txt)) ? alert('passed') : alert('failed');

 }

 checkChar("GARNSEY B R & D B GARNSEY");
})()
share|improve this answer
    
So in your code how does \1 at the end know that it must match the word in the beginning? Is it that specifying "1" means whatever text is here must match the FIRST instance at the beginning? –  JohnMerlino Jan 13 '11 at 19:06
    
\1 returns the match inside the first set of parentheses. \2 the 2nd etc. –  Gerben Jan 13 '11 at 20:59
    
Yeah now it's clear to me. –  JohnMerlino Jan 14 '11 at 0:47
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This regexp will test if there is a name, followed by an arbitrary amount of garbage, ending in the same name:

var re = /^(\w+)\b.+\b\1$/;
re.test( "GARNSEY B R & D B GARNSEY" ); // true
re.test( "GARNSEY B R & D GARNSEY" );   // true
re.test( "GARNSEY B R & D GURNSEY" );   // false
re.test( "GARNSEY B R & D ZGARNSEY" );  // false
share|improve this answer
    
your code also matches GARNSEYZ B R & D GARNSEY. Add a \b before the dot, to correct –  Gerben Jan 13 '11 at 17:01
    
@Gerben Good point, thanks. –  Phrogz Jan 13 '11 at 17:22
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