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  1. What would the MSDN sample look like without the yield keyword? You may use any example if you perfer. I would just like to understand what is going on under the hood.
  2. Is the yield operator eagerly or lazily evaluated?

Sample:

using System;
using System.Collections;
public class List
{
    public static IEnumerable Power(int number, int exponent)
    {
        int counter = 0;
        int result = 1;
        while (counter++ < exponent)
        {
            result = result * number;
            yield return result;
        }
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        // Display powers of 2 up to the exponent 8:
        foreach (int i in Power(2, 8))
        {
            Console.Write("{0} ", i);
        }
    }
}

If the yield operator is eagerly evaluated here is my guess:

    public static IEnumerable Power(int number, int exponent)
    {
        int counter = 0;
        int result = 1;
        List<int> powers;
        while (counter++ < exponent)
        {
            result = result * number;
            powers.add(result);
        }
        return powers;
    }

I have no clue what it might look like if the yield operator is lazily evaluated.

Update: Reflector gives this:

public class List
{
    // Methods
    public List();
    private static void Main();
    public static IEnumerable Power(int number, int exponent);

    // Nested Types
    [CompilerGenerated]
    private sealed class <Power>d__0 : IEnumerable<object>, IEnumerable, IEnumerator<object>, IEnumerator, IDisposable
    {
        // Fields
        private int <>1__state;
        private object <>2__current;
        public int <>3__exponent;
        public int <>3__number;
        private int <>l__initialThreadId;
        public int <counter>5__1;
        public int <result>5__2;
        public int exponent;
        public int number;

        // Methods
        [DebuggerHidden]
        public <Power>d__0(int <>1__state);
        private bool MoveNext();
        [DebuggerHidden]
        IEnumerator<object> IEnumerable<object>.GetEnumerator();
        [DebuggerHidden]
        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator();
        [DebuggerHidden]
        void IEnumerator.Reset();
        void IDisposable.Dispose();

        // Properties
        object IEnumerator<object>.Current { [DebuggerHidden] get; }
        object IEnumerator.Current { [DebuggerHidden] get; }
    }
}

IEnumerator<object> IEnumerable<object>.GetEnumerator()
{
    List.<Power>d__0 d__;
    if ((Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId == this.<>l__initialThreadId) && (this.<>1__state == -2))
    {
        this.<>1__state = 0;
        d__ = this;
    }
    else
    {
        d__ = new List.<Power>d__0(0);
    }
    d__.number = this.<>3__number;
    d__.exponent = this.<>3__exponent;
    return d__;
}



private bool MoveNext()
{
    switch (this.<>1__state)
    {
        case 0:
            this.<>1__state = -1;
            this.<counter>5__1 = 0;
            this.<result>5__2 = 1;
            while (this.<counter>5__1++ < this.exponent)
            {
                this.<result>5__2 *= this.number;
                this.<>2__current = this.<result>5__2;
                this.<>1__state = 1;
                return true;
            Label_0065:
                this.<>1__state = -1;
            }
            break;

        case 1:
            goto Label_0065;
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this question
    
If this is homework you should tag it as such. –  ChristopheD Jan 13 '11 at 17:01
    
Sure its personal development homework. –  user295190 Jan 13 '11 at 17:02
    
This is an exact duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/742497/… –  Eric Lippert Jan 13 '11 at 17:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Back in the good old days, before we had the yield operator, we used to write classes which implemented IEnumerator.

class PowerEnumerator : IEnumerator<int>
{
  private int _number;
  private int _exponent;
  private int _current = 1;

  public PowerEnumerator(int number, int exponent)
  {
    _number = number;
    _exponent = exponent;
  }

  public bool MoveNext()
  {
    _current *= number;
    return _exponent-- > 0;
  }

  public int Current
  {
    get
    {
      if (_exponent < 0) throw new InvalidOperationException();
      return _current;
    }
  }
}

Or something like that. It wasn't fun, let me tell you.

share|improve this answer
2  
Obviously I've implemented the generic version, although that wasn't available either. And we had to walk 5 miles in the snow just to start a build. Mind you, you could have a night out for £3.50 and still have enough change for a bag of chips and a bus home. –  Mark Rendle Jan 13 '11 at 17:20
1  
Amen. If I never again have to build an entire class just to have a strongly typed version of ArrayList, that's fine by me. –  LoveMeSomeCode Jan 13 '11 at 20:52
    
I appreciate Eric Lipperts answer but this answer hits the nail on the head. –  user295190 Oct 2 '11 at 23:25
    
Ahahh....very good explanation of why yield can be helpful! Thanks Mark. –  Pete855217 May 29 '13 at 6:39

First off, yield is not an operator. yield return and yield break are statements.

There are plenty of articles available on how the compiler implements iterator blocks. Start by reading the C# specification section on iterator blocks; it gives some suggestions for how an implementer of C# might want to go about it.

Next read Raymond Chen's series "The implementation of iterators in C# and its consequences"

http://www.bing.com/search?q=raymond+chen+the+implementation+of+iterators

Next, read Jon Skeet's book chapter on the subject:

http://csharpindepth.com/Articles/Chapter6/IteratorBlockImplementation.aspx

If after all that you are still interested then read my series on the design factors that went into this feature:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/tags/iterators/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Eric, lots to read there. It's an intriguing statement (not operator lol). –  Pete855217 May 29 '13 at 6:37
  1. Let .NET Reflector decompile it. It's a generic solution (a state machine actually), but quite complex, > 20 lines of codes if I remember correctly.
  2. Lazy. That's the point why yield can be quite efficient.
share|improve this answer
  1. It would be a custom implementation of IEnumerable<T>, not leaning on an existing implementation such as List<T>
  2. Lazily.

More info available here.

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