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Why this returns 0 rows

SELECT GARTUSERID, USER_CODE, UNITID, RANKCODE, RANKID, FIO, LOGINNAME, 
       START_DATE, EXPIR_DATE, NOTE, POSITION, ISCHGPASSWORD, IS_EXPIRDATE,
       IS_BLOCKED, ROW_ID
  FROM ACONTROL.GARTUSERS
 WHERE LOWER(LOGINNAME)=LOWER(:LOGIN) AND ROW_ID=:MD5PSWD

and this returns 1 row (as I wanted for the first query)?

SELECT GARTUSERID, USER_CODE, UNITID, RANKCODE, RANKID, FIO, LOGINNAME,
       START_DATE, EXPIR_DATE, NOTE, POSITION, ISCHGPASSWORD, IS_EXPIRDATE,
       IS_BLOCKED, ROW_ID 
  FROM ACONTROL.GARTUSERS
 WHERE LOGINNAME=:LOGIN AND ROW_ID=:MD5PSWD
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1  
What is the definition for the LOGINNAME column, and what does :LOGIN contain? –  Alex Poole Jan 13 '11 at 17:10
    
What is the value of that one LOGINNAME? –  DOK Jan 13 '11 at 17:10
    
What is your database NLS character setting? Have a look at the NLS_LOWER() function. –  tawman Jan 13 '11 at 17:17
    
Do a "SELECT LOWER(LOGINNAME), LOWER(:LOGIN)..." and see what they look like. –  JOTN Jan 13 '11 at 17:24
    
LOGINNAME is CHAR(16) and contains 'root' value. I forgot to mention that this query works from dbartisan but fails in tableadapter's dataset designer –  Nickolodeon Jan 13 '11 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Could this be a data type conflict for LOGINNAME? Try using VARCHAR2, as opposed to CHAR since it pads the string with whitespace.

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That's what I've started to think too. Unfortunetly, I have no control over that field's datatype. May be I can use TRIM also –  Nickolodeon Jan 13 '11 at 18:33

You can use TRIM keyword to terminate the white space and since it is the type of varchar use LIKE instead of '=' for comparison.

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