Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a little helper to turn EF4 objects to POCOs. (I know there is AutoMapper, but I'm having a c# dilemma at this time)

How can I make this work (the where P: new(E) is not legal I wish to make sure the P (POCO) class as a constructor that takes the E class (hence handling the transformation)

How can I make this work ?

How can I make a generic function in C# that can take a new(type) constraint ?

   public static List<P> ListConvert<E, P>(List<E> efList) where P: new(E)
    {
        List<P> pList = new List<P>();

        foreach (E item in efList)
        {
            P myItem = new P(item);
            pList.Add(myItem);
        }
        return pList;
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's no such constraint. What you can do is have an extra parameter:

public static List<P> ListConvert<E, P>(List<E> efList, Func<E, P> func)

That way it isn't required to be a constructor, but you can pass in a delegate which calls the constructor:

ListConvert(list, x => new Foo(x))

I have a blue-sky idea which would enable constructor constraints, called "static interfaces" - these would only be useful for generic constraints, but would also enable some operator use cases.

share|improve this answer
    
"static interfaces" - you should try generics in F# –  Tim Robinson Jan 13 '11 at 17:17
2  
@Tim: There are many things I should try in F# :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 13 '11 at 17:18
    
Thanks @Tim and @Jon - This does the work. maybe in dot-net 5.0 they will add new(type) constraint to c# (+1 both.. as both directed me to the answer :-) ) –  Dani Jan 13 '11 at 18:06

This is not possible. The new constraint only allows you to create objects via a public parameterless constructor.

share|improve this answer

There's no such thing as P : new(E), but you could have the caller supply a delegate that knows how to construct a P given an E:

public static List<P> ListConvert<E, P>(List<E> efList, Func<E, P> converter)
{
    List<P> pList = new List<P>();

    foreach (E item in efList)
    {
        P myItem = converter(item);
        pList.Add(myItem);
    }
    return pList;
}

However, if you're doing this, you may as well use LINQ: efList.Select(e => new P(e)).ToList().

share|improve this answer
    
the Where P: new(e) has the same problem... but I think it doesn't need to be there with the converter –  Dani Jan 13 '11 at 17:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.