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Both columns should be used: Customer_num is first, but if null, then use the Vendor_num.

To be more specific, I need to write a DECODE statement that will return the following:

If Customer_num IS NOT NULL then return Customer_num If Customer_num IS NULL then return Vendor_num If Vendor_num IS NULL Or If Customer_num IS NULL then return Customer_num

How can I do this?

Thanks...

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I think you're looking for COALESCE

COALESCE(Customer_num , Vendor_num)

Note this last requirement

If Vendor_num IS NULL Or If Customer_num IS NULL then return Customer_num

Will either retrun Customer_num (because of the first requirement) or NULL when they are both null.

share|improve this answer
    
Not to worry, I figured it out by myself using NVL(DECODE(..)). Thanks. – valmont74 Jan 13 '11 at 18:49

I agree with the other posters that the "better" way to do this is to use NVL or COALESCE. However, although I didn't expect this to work it appears that the following will do what you asked:

SELECT DECODE(CUSTOMER_NUM,
                 NULL, DECODE(VENDOR_NUM,
                                NULL, CUSTOMER_NUM,
                                      VENDOR_NUM),
                       CUSTOMER_NUM)
  FROM DUAL;

What's odd is that we can use DECODE to compare a value to NULL and have it return (apparently) TRUE. In my mind the code above is conceptually the same as

IF CUSTOMER_NUM = NULL THEN
  IF VENDOR_NUM = NULL THEN
    RETURN CUSTOMER_NUM;
  ELSE
    RETURN VENDOR_NUM;
  END IF;
ELSE
  RETURN CUSTOMER_NUM;
END;

Apparently DECODE is bright enough to perform comparisons to NULL as if an IS NULL clause was used. Thanks for posing this interesting little problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, wrapping the DECODE statement in SELECT ... FROM DUAL worked fine for me, even though it would probably be cleaner to use CASE instead. – peterp Feb 8 '13 at 9:23
    
@peterp - I agree that CASE would be much clearer but the OP specifically wanted to use DECODE. – Bob Jarvis Feb 11 '13 at 12:38
    
I know, that's why I gave you +1, just added this as additional info, for those who are not too lazy to get rid of the DECODE statement. (I was ;-)) – peterp Feb 12 '13 at 9:46

Your question is not that clear.

But you could try using nvl:

select nvl(customer_num, vendor_num)
  from your_table;
share|improve this answer
    
Not to worry, I figured it out by myself using NVL(DECODE(..)). Thanks. – valmont74 Jan 13 '11 at 18:49

Try

 SELECT coalesce( expr1, expr2, ... expr_n )
 FROM DUAL;
share|improve this answer
    
It is not I was looking for, but still thanks. I figured it out by myself using DECODE. I wasn't aware about COALESCE, up until now. Thanks again. – valmont74 Jan 13 '11 at 18:47

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