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I have a c# .NET multi-threaded application that is freezing the interface. What is unusual about this is that the interface does not freeze unless I let the system sit idle long enough for the screen saver to start (which requires me to reenter my password to re-gain access to the system). When the interface becomes visible again (after I have successfully entered my password) all the windows are white. I can see the window titles, move the windows around, minimize them and such, but the screens are not repainting. When I break all and enter the debugger, the call stack has Application.Run(), external code, and then "in a sleep, wait, or join". I put break points in all four of the threads I open and they are still running, it is just the main app's UI thread that is blocked. When I look at my thread list, what was my main thread and my four worker threads now consists of my main thread and 11 worker threads. I didn't open this many threads so it must be the serialport class.

Now let me describe my program.

My main app allows users to collect and monitor data from serial ports. I have implemented this in the following way. When a connection is desired, a button is pressed on the main app which calls a function in a DLL which opens a status window and then launches a thread which monitors the serial port. When that function returns, the main app launches a thread to monitor a queue created in the DLL when it is initialized. When data is received from the serial port, the data is parsed and then the status window is updated (via a delegate) and the data is pushed onto the queue. When the main apps worker thread sees data in the queue it retrieves it and posts it in a list box on the main app, using a delegate. In all cases I use BeginInvoke to call these delegates.

My DLL contains two libraries for the two different types of equipment it can communicate with.

This problem occurs when I have a connection to two devices; hence the four worker threads two for each device. The DLL itself is setup as a comm object so I can access it easily from a C++/MFC app and a c# app, both of which utilize it.

I found that if I add code to the thread inside the DLL so it calls Application.DoEvents() every 30 seconds, the interface will be frozen for about 30 seconds and then resume activity like normal. I figure something is blocking the main thread and forcing DoEvents() to fire seems to break the lock, but I have no idea what might be causing this lock. This is not a solution, just something of interest.

I would appreciate any suggestions you might have. Thanks.

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possible duplicate of Interface freezes in multi-threaded c# application –  Hans Passant Jan 13 '11 at 18:45
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2 Answers

I found that if I add code to the thread inside the DLL so it calls Application.DoEvents() every 30 seconds, the interface will be frozen for about 30 seconds and then resume activity like normal. I figure something is blocking the main thread and forcing DoEvents() to fire seems to break the lock, but I have no idea what might be causing this lock. This is not a solution, just something of interest.

I would recommend running your program under the new Visual Studio 2010 Concurrency Profiler. This will show you, at runtime, which threads are blocked, and which objects they are waiting on. Thread contention is explicitly marked and highlighted for you.

You can use this to easily determine what code is causing the deadlock on your UI thread.

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That sounds promising. I only have 2008, so I guess it's time to upgrade. Thanks. –  PhilGyro Jan 13 '11 at 19:16
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Try changing your Thread Start code to Thread.Start() instead of BeginInvoke(). BeginInvoke does not keep threads tryky seperate from your UI, as it and it may be interacting strangely with DoEvents. You can read up on BeginInvoke and how it works here: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/begininvoke.aspx

Also, DoEvents is NEVER necessary in an application, and can cause a lot of unexpected behavior. Use threadding with UI calls wrapped in a Control.Invoke(...) statement. If you're using .NET 3.5+, you can make this easy with delegates that look like this: Invoke((Action)delegate() {*code goes here*});

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I don't use BeginInvoke to start my threads, I use it to call the delegate functions. –  PhilGyro Jan 13 '11 at 18:30
    
+1 here, I had a different GUI thread problem yesterday. Switching from BeginInvoke to Thread.Start() was a part of the solution. The final part related to subtleties of inter-thread timing during startup. –  winwaed Jan 13 '11 at 18:31
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