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I am making a first attempt at playing with the new Tasks, but something is happening that I don't understand.

First, the code, which is pretty straight-forward. I pass in a list of paths to some image files, and attempt to add a task to process each of them:

public Boolean AddPictures(IList<string> paths)
{
    Boolean result = (paths.Count > 0);
    List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>(paths.Count);

    foreach (string path in paths)
    {
        var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                Boolean taskResult = ProcessPicture(path);
                return taskResult;
            });
        task.ContinueWith(t => result &= t.Result);
        tasks.Add(task);
    }

    Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());

    return result;
}

I've found that if I just let this run with, say, a list of 3 paths in a unit test, all three tasks use the last path in the provided list. If I step through (and slow down the processing of the loop), each path from the loop is used.

Can somebody please explain what is happening, and why? Possible workarounds?

Thanks,
wTs

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2  
May I suggest using ReSharper. This particular error and other potential bugs are highlighten for you –  Rune FS Jan 13 '11 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 45 down vote accepted

You're closing over the loop variable. Don't do that. Take a copy instead:

foreach (string path in paths)
{
    string pathCopy = path;
    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            Boolean taskResult = ProcessPicture(pathCopy);
            return taskResult;
        });
    task.ContinueWith(t => result &= t.Result);
    tasks.Add(task);
}

Your current code is capturing path - not the value of it when you create the task, but the variable itself. That variable changes value each time you go through the loop - so it can easily change by the time your delegate is called.

By taking a copy of the variable, you're introducing a new variable each time you go through the loop - when you capture that variable, it won't be changed in the next iteration of the loop.

Eric Lippert has a pair of blog posts which go into this in a lot more detail: part 1; part 2.

Don't feel bad - this catches almost everyone out :(

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But of course. Forest for the trees and all that. :) –  Wonko the Sane Jan 13 '11 at 19:32
1  
this closure problem and in-proper use of Random() must be in the top 5 frequency-wise at SO –  BrokenGlass Jan 13 '11 at 19:35
    
Please note that this "bug" (which was originally by design) is supposed to be fixed in C#5.0 –  Baboon Apr 25 '12 at 14:32
1  
This behaviour has changed, not only in C#5.0 (as noted in the update on Eric Lipperts blog article), but also in VS2012 if you're targeting 4.0. –  Snixtor Mar 1 '13 at 0:42
4  
@Snixtor: That's still the C# 5 compiler. It's important to distinguish between the language version you're using, and the framework version you're targeting. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 6:42

The lambda that you're passing to StartNew is referencing the path variable, which changes on each iteration (i.e. your lambda is making use of the reference of path, rather than just its value). You can create a local copy of it so that you aren't pointing to a version that will change:

foreach (string path in paths)
{
    var lambdaPath = path;
    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            Boolean taskResult = ProcessPicture(lambdaPath);
            return taskResult;
        });
    task.ContinueWith(t => result &= t.Result);
    tasks.Add(task);
}
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