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Can someone confirm my suspicion on this line of code.

NSUInteger newPath[] = {[indexPath section],0};

I'm pretty sure it's a C array of NSUIntegers. Am I right about this? Can you even make C arrays of Objective C objects?

Here is the code in context:

-(UITableViewCellEditingStyle)tableView:(UITableView *) tableViewEditingStyleForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath*)indexPath{

if ([self isToManyRelationshipSection:[indexPath section]]) {
    NSUInteger newPath[] = {[indexPath section],0};
    NSIndexPath *row0IndexPath = [NSIndexPath indexPathWithIndexes:newPath length:2];

    NSString *rowKey = [rowKeys nestedObjectAtIndexPath:row0IndexPath];
    NSString *rowLabel = [rowLabels nestedObjectAtIndexPath:row0IndexPath];
    NSMutableSet *rowSet = [managedObject mutableSetValueForKey:rowKey];//!!!: to-many?
    NSArray *rowArray = [NSArray arrayByOrderingSet:rowSet byKey:rowLabel ascending:YES];

    if ([indexPath row] >= [rowArray count]) {
        return UITableViewCellEditingStyleInsert;
    }

    return UITableViewCellEditingStyleDelete;
}
return UITableViewCellEditingStyleNone;
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NSUInteger isnt an object, its a c type, defined here: developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/… –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 13 '11 at 19:39
    
Nice, I didn't realize. So it's a dynamic basic type. "When building 32-bit applications, NSUInteger is a 32-bit unsigned integer. A 64-bit application treats NSUInteger as a 64-bit unsigned integer" –  MakingScienceFictionFact Jan 13 '11 at 23:40
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you're correct. However...

NSUInteger newPath[] = {[indexPath section],0};
NSIndexPath *row0IndexPath = [NSIndexPath indexPathWithIndexes:newPath length:2];

I would strongly discourage you from using this format to create an NSIndexPath that's intended for use in a UITableView. There's a convenience method to do this much more simply:

NSIndexPath *row0IndexPath = [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:0 inSection:[indexPath section]];
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I'm pretty sure it's a C array of NSUIntegers. Am I right about this?

Yep, it sure is.

Can you even make C arrays of Objective C objects?

You can. For example, this is an array of two NSString *:

NSString *myStrings[] = {@"one", @"two"};

Is this useful? Sometimes, but it's almost always beneficial to use an NSArray if you need an array of objects.

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Great answer. Thank you. –  MakingScienceFictionFact Jan 13 '11 at 23:38
    
@MakingScienceFictionFact If its such a great answer, then I suggest you click the Check next to the answer :) –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 14 '11 at 14:56
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NSUInteger is not an Objective-c object. It is a typedef for an unsigned integer. Depending on your platform, it may be int or long. But it isn't an object. So you just have a c array of ints, basically.

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