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Please tell me how the operator->() in being defined for the iterator of std::list in order to refer members of the element that is being pointed by an iterator.

EDIT:

The problem is that if you implement like this (Fred Nurk):

template<class T>
struct list {
private:
  struct Node {  // internal class that actually makes up the list structure
    Node *prev, *next;
    T data;
  };

public:
  struct iterator {  // iterator interface to the above internal node type
    T* operator->() const {
      return &_node->data;
    }
  private:
    Node *_node;
  }
};

Then when you write:

struct A {
  int n;
};
void f() {
  list<A> L;  // imagine this is filled with some data
  list<A>::iterator x = L.begin();

  x->n = 42;
}

Then

x->n I understand like x->operator->()n which is equivalent to (A ponter to a)n which is a nonsence. How to understand this part. Some answers tell that it is equivalent to x->operator->()->n; (instead of x->operator->()n) but I don't understand why. Please explain me this.

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There's no operator-> in std::list. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 13 '11 at 19:46
    
That is true. I have missed the "iterator". –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 19:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With many details elided, here is the gist of how it works:

template<class T>
struct list {
private:
  struct Node {  // internal class that actually makes up the list structure
    Node *prev, *next;
    T data;
  };

public:
  struct iterator {  // iterator interface to the above internal node type
    T* operator->() const {
      return &_node->data;
    }
  private:
    Node *_node;
  }
};

Thus, given:

struct A {
  int n;
};
void f() {
  list<A> L;  // imagine this is filled with some data
  list<A>::iterator x = L.begin();

  x->n = 42;
  // x.operator->() returns an A*
  // which gets -> applied again with "n"
}
share|improve this answer
    
But we have no two operators->. Why it is applied twice? –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 19:54
    
@Narek: Because that's how it works. –  Fred Nurk Jan 13 '11 at 19:55
2  
@Narek: Though I believe your reliance on standardese is unhelpful at your apparent level, even though you keep asking for it, see §13.5.6 in C++03. –  Fred Nurk Jan 13 '11 at 20:22
    
Thank you very much (and +1) for warm words ;) and also for the answer. Yes I see that answer in §13.5.6, that is, "An expression x->m is interpreted as (x.operator->())->m ........" –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 20:37

(hint: It returns a pointer to the element.)

share|improve this answer
    
I think you nailed it perfectly :) –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 13 '11 at 19:44
    
I know but the problem is that how when I write my_iterator->member_name, then I obtain the "member_name" member of the element that is pointed by the my_iterator? –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 19:46
    
@Narek: another hint: it's an unary operator. –  ybungalobill Jan 13 '11 at 19:48
    
Thanks guys. And one more hint on my behalf: it is the operator->() ;) –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 20:40

The -> operator behaves as follows:

T->x; // some field
T->foo(); // some function

...is equivalent to:

T.operator->()->x;
T.operator->()->foo();

Note the re-application of -> to whatever is returned.

share|improve this answer
    
Is the re-application defined by the standard? –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 19:52
    
Yes. Check out section 5.2.5. –  Toolbox Jan 13 '11 at 19:55
    
I can not see there any sentence that pointes to double invocation of operator->(). Please cite the paragraph. –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 20:14
    
@Narek: Sorry, that was the wrong section. It looks like Fred has already provided the correct one, though. –  Toolbox Jan 13 '11 at 21:47

Operator -> is implemented differently than the other operators in C++. The operator function is expected to return a pointer, and the -> is applied again to that pointer.

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So it is being apllied twice? How it is being done? –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 19:47
1  
@Narek - it's being accomplished by design. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Jan 13 '11 at 19:49
    
@Narek, it's C++ compiler magic as defined by Bjarne Stroustrup and the C++ standardization committee. –  Mark Ransom Jan 13 '11 at 19:50

It returns pointer. Just for completeness, here is simple example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class SafeVectorIterator
{
    vector<T> & _vec;
    size_t _pos;
public:
    SafeVectorIterator(vector<T> & vec) : _vec(vec), _pos(0) { }

    void operator++() { ++_pos; }
    void operator--() { --_pos; }

    T& operator*() { return _vec.at(_pos); }
    T* operator->() { return &_vec.at(_pos); }

};

struct point { int x, y; }; 

int main()
{
    vector<point> vec;
    point p = { 1, 2 };
    vec.push_back(p);
    vec.push_back(p);
    SafeVectorIterator<point> it(vec);
    ++it;
    it->x = 8;
    cout << (*it).y << '\n';

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a curious op-- you have there. –  Fred Nurk Jan 13 '11 at 20:19
    
Thanks for the example. –  Narek Jan 13 '11 at 20:41
    
@Fred Nurk - lol, really. Thnx, fixed. –  peenut Jan 13 '11 at 21:45

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