Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Like the title states, are the integer (or any numerical datatypes like float etc.) comparison operators (==, !=, >, >=, <, <=) short circuited in C++?

share|improve this question
    
In what way? Do you mean if those are chained with boolean comparisons like && and ||? –  Toolbox Jan 13 '11 at 19:51
2  
You mean like in 12 < x < 15? Because you can't do that in C++. And I can't see any other way to consider them to be short circuited –  Federico Culloca Jan 13 '11 at 19:52
2  
The funny thing is that you explained in the detail any part of the question (what you mean by integers, what comparison operators are), but what short circuited mean. What is it? –  peoro Jan 13 '11 at 19:54
    
    
&& and || are control structures, thinking of them similarly to comparison operators will confuse you. –  Fred Nurk Jan 13 '11 at 20:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

They can't short circuit. To know if x == y, x != y, etc are true or false you need to evaluate both, x and y. Short circuiting refers to logical boolean operators && and ||. Logical AND is known to be false if the first argument is false and Logical OR is known to be true if the first argument is true. In these cases you don't need to evaluate the second argument, this is called short circuiting.

Edit: this follows the discussions for why x >= y don't short circuit when the operands are unsigned ints and x is zero:

For logical operands short circuiting comes for free and is implementation neutral. The machine code for if(f() && g()) stmt; is likely to look similar to this:

call f
test return value of f
jump to next on zero
call g
test return value of g
jump to next on zero
execute stmt
next: ...

To prevent short circuiting you actually need to do the computation of the result of the operator and test it after that. This takes you a register and makes the code less efficient.

For non-logical operators the situation is the opposite. Mandating short circuiting implies:

  • The compiler can't choose an evaluation of the expression that uses a minimum number of registers.
  • The semantics may be implementation defined (or even undefined) for many cases, like when comparing with maximum value.
  • The compiler needs to add an additional test/jump. For if(f() > g()) stmt; the machine code will look like this:

    call f
    mov return value of f to R1
    test return value of f
    jump to next on zero
    call g
    compare R1 with return value of g
    jump to next on less-than equal
    execute stmt
    next: ...
    

    Note how the first test and jump are just unnecessary otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Technically, < and > can be short-circuited (lazily evaluated) for some values of fixed-size integer types. Still, +1. –  larsmans Jan 13 '11 at 19:55
1  
They are all fixed-size, the standard just doesn't specify the size (only that there has to be one and how to obtain it). –  larsmans Jan 13 '11 at 19:57
1  
@larsman right. But still the order of evaluation of operands is unspecified and the compiler should evaluate both of them to prevent implementation specific surprises. –  ybungalobill Jan 13 '11 at 19:58
1  
And == can be short-circuited for floating types when the LHS is a NaN. Also not worth the confusion that would be introduced by conditionally not evaluating the RHS. –  Steve Jessop Jan 13 '11 at 19:58
1  
@larsmans: Because we already think of && and || as control structures rather than as (boolean) numerical operators. –  Fred Nurk Jan 13 '11 at 20:12

No. The comparison operators require both operands to evaluate the correct answer. By contrast, the logical operators && and || in some cases don't need to evaluate the right operand to get the right answer, and therefore do "short-circuit".

share|improve this answer

No, how could they be. In order to check whether 1 == 2 you have to inspect both the 1 and the 2. (Ofcoruse, a compiler can do a lot of reordering, static checking, optimizations, etc. but that's not inherit to c++)

share|improve this answer
    
s/inherit/inherent/ # :P –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '11 at 19:55

How would that work? Short-circuiting means you can avoid evaluating the RHS based solely on the result of evaluating the LHS.

e.g.

true || false

doesn't need to evaluate the RHS because true || x is true no matter what x turns out to be.

But this won't work for any of the comparisons that you list. For example:

5 == x

How can you ever know the result of the expression without knowing x?

share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter: Comment and explain please. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '11 at 20:03
    
0 > x is always false for unsigned x. (I didn't downvote, btw.) –  larsmans Jan 13 '11 at 20:05
    
I upvoted for rebalance –  Federico Culloca Jan 13 '11 at 20:06
    
@larsmans: As I pointed out in my comment on the same topic in your answer, the C++ standard could never mandate that as the integral type ranges are all implementation-defined (though, mathematically speaking, your logic is of course sound). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '11 at 20:07
1  
@larsmans: Yea actually I guess the lowerbound for unsigned int is likely mandated. OK, well another approach to this is that it would be highly eccentric of the language to allow short-circuiting just for that one edge case, but not for others. It would get very confusing considering which comparisons have side-effects and which don't. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '11 at 20:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.