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I am using lxml 2.2.8 and trying to transform some existing html files into django templates. the only problem that i am having is that lxml urlencodes the anchor name and href attributes. for example:

<xsl:template match="a">
<!-- anchor attribute href is urlencoded but the title is escaped -->
<a href="{{{{item.get_absolute_url}}}}" title="{{{{item.title}}}}">
    <!-- name tag is urlencoded -->
    <xsl:attribute name="name">{{item.name}}</xsl:attribute>
    <!-- but other attributes are not -->
    <xsl:attribute name="nid">{{item.nid}}</xsl:attribute>
    <xsl:attribute name="class">{{item.class_one}}</xsl:attribute>
    <xsl:apply-templates/>
</a>

produces html like this:

<a href="%7B%7Bitem.get_absolute_url%7D%7D"  
   title="{{item.title}}" name="%7B%7Bitem.name%7D%7D" 
   nid="{{item.nid}}" class="{{item.class_one}}">more info</a>

what I am trying for is this:

<a href="{{item.get_absolute_url}}">more info</a>

is there a way to disable the (automatic) urlencoding that lxml is doing?

here is (basically) the code I am using to generate and parse the file:

from lxml import etree, html
from StringIO import StringIO

doc = StringIO(
'''<html>
<head>
    <title>An experiment</title>
</head>
<body>
<p class="one">This is an interesting paragraph detailing the inner workings of something</p>
<p class="two">paragraph with <a href="/link/to/more">more info</a></p>
<p>posted by: me</p>
</body>
</html>''')

stylesheet = StringIO(
'''<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" 
xmlns:xhtml="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
exclude-result-prefixes="xhtml xsl">
<xsl:template match="p[@class='one']">
    <xsl:copy>
        <!-- when adding an attribute with the xsl:attribute tag -->
        <!-- the curly braces are not escaped, ie you dont have  -->
        <!-- to double them up -->
        <xsl:attribute name="class">{{item.class_one}}</xsl:attribute>
        <xsl:attribute name="nid">{{item.nid}}</xsl:attribute>
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="p[@class='two']">
    <!-- but double 'em up in this instance -->
    <p class="{{{{item.class_two}}}}">
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </p>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="a">
    <!-- anchor attribute href is urlencoded but the title is escaped -->
    <a href="{{{{item.get_absolute_url}}}}" title="{{{{item.title}}}}">
        <!-- name tag is urlencoded -->
        <xsl:attribute name="name">{{item.name}}</xsl:attribute>
        <!-- but oher attributes are not -->
        <xsl:attribute name="nid">{{item.nid}}</xsl:attribute>
        <xsl:attribute name="class">{{item.class_one}}</xsl:attribute>
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </a>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="@*|node()">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates />
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
''')
def parse_doc():
    xsl = etree.parse(stylesheet)
    trans = etree.XSLT(xsl)
    root = html.parse(doc, etree.HTMLParser(encoding="windows-1252"))
    transformed = trans(root)
    print html.tostring(transformed)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    parse_doc()

with the exception that these files are all malformed html :)

share|improve this question
    
Does this still happen if you declare <xsl:output method="xml" /> in your XSLT program? –  Tomalak Jan 13 '11 at 20:25
    
Only Altova can reproduce this with html method serialization. MSXSL 3/4 and Saxon don't. –  user357812 Jan 13 '11 at 20:32
    
@Tomalak I did try changing the output method to xml and it didnt have any affect –  AnvilRockRoad Jan 13 '11 at 20:52
    
That behavior for xml serialization method is a bug –  user357812 Jan 13 '11 at 22:43
    
so lxml should not be converting the curly braces to "%7B"? Yes I am a little bit dense :) –  AnvilRockRoad Jan 13 '11 at 23:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Maybe you can use the XML instead of the HTML serializer.

>>> from lxml import etree, html
>>> 
>>> t = etree.XML('<a href="{{x}}" />')
>>> 
>>> etree.tostring(t)
'<a href="{{x}}"/>'
>>> html.tostring(t)
'<a href="%7B%7Bx%7D%7D"></a>'
share|improve this answer
    
changing from html to etree does work with my sample code, I will see if I can get it to work on the real stuff –  AnvilRockRoad Jan 13 '11 at 21:13
    
as Alejandro pointed out lxml is just doing what it is supposed to. It took some work since the html is really, really, malformed but what I ended up doing was using etree.html to parse the initial file and ran that through the xslt transformation. Then I just extracted the elements I wanted and used etree.tostring to spit out my markup. –  AnvilRockRoad Jan 13 '11 at 22:26
    
@AnvilRockRoad: In XSLT 1.0 you could also use the xml serialization method and follow the XHTML-serve-as-HTML guidelines. In XSLT 2.0 you have the control for allowing this behavior or not. –  user357812 Jan 13 '11 at 22:40

It looks like that should be the proper output for html serialization method.

From http://www.w3.org/TR/xslt#section-HTML-Output-Method

The html output method should escape non-ASCII characters in URI attribute values using the method recommended in Section B.2.1 of the HTML 4.0 Recommendation.

For XSLT 2.0 from http://www.w3.org/TR/xslt-xquery-serialization/#HTML_ESCAPE-URI-ATTRIBUTES

If the escape-uri-attributes parameter has the value yes, the HTML output method MUST apply URI escaping to URI attribute values, except that relative URIs MUST NOT be absolutized.

share|improve this answer

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