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a grid of NxN is given. each point is assigned a value say num

starting from 1,1 we have to traverse to N,N.

if i,j is current position we can go right or down. How to find the min sum of digits by traversing from 1,1 to n,n along any path any two points can have same number ex

1 2 3

4 5 6

7 8 9

1+2+3+6+9 = 21 n <=10000000000

Output 21 Can someone explain how to approach the problem?

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Is this homework? Either way no one is going to do your job for you. If you come here with what you have and ask for help with a specific problem you'll get an answer. SO isn't for people to write entire programs for you... –  Abe Miessler Jan 13 '11 at 20:57
    
this is programming contest. just asking how to approach the problem –  user535450 Jan 13 '11 at 20:58
1  
If that's true I would recommend removing the Can someone write a program part of your question. –  Abe Miessler Jan 13 '11 at 21:00
    
Since you say this is a contest, my question to you is if it is allowed to ask for help? I would imagine the judges (or your fellow participants) might call this cheating. –  Bart Kiers Jan 13 '11 at 21:02
    
I'm pretty sure this is one of the early Project Euler problems. The solution is probably already here somewhere. –  Bill the Lizard Jan 13 '11 at 21:05
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a dynamic programming problem. The subproblem here is the minimum cost/path to get to any given square. Because you can only move down and to the right, there are only two squares that can let you enter a given square, the one above and the one to the left. Therefore the cost of getting to a square (i,i) is min(cost[i-1][i], cost[i][i-1]) + num. If this would put you out of bounds, only consider the option that is inside the grid. Calculate each row from left to right, doing the top row first and working your way down. The cost you get at (N,N) will be the minimal cost.

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You can convert the grid into a graph. The edges get the weights of the values from your grid elements. Then you can find the solution with the shortest path problem.

start--1--+--2--+--3--+
          |     |     |
          4     5     6
          |     |     |
          +--5--+--6--+
          |     |     |
          7     8     9
          |     |     |
          +--8--+--9--end
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Not a bad idea, but much more complex than what is needed. –  user470379 Jan 13 '11 at 21:26
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Here is my solution with dynamic - programming in O(n^2)

you start with (1,1) so you can find say a = (1,2) and b = (2,1) by a = value(1,1) + value(1,2). Then, to find (2,2) select the minimum (a+ value(2,2)) and (b + value(2,2)) and continue with this logic. You can find any minimum sum among (1,1) and (i,j) with that algorithm. Let me explain,

Given Matrix

1 2 3

4 5 6

7 8 9

Shortest path :

1 3 . 
5 . . 
. . . 

so to find (2,2) take the original value(2,2)=5 from Given Matrix and select min(5 + 5), 3 + 5) = 8. so

Shortest path :

1 3 6 
5 8 . 
12 . .

so to find (3,2) select min (12 + 8, 8 + 8) = 16 and (2,3) = min(8 + 6, 6 + 6) = 12

Shortest path :

1 3 6 
5 8 12 
12 16 . 

so the last one (3,3) = min (12 + 9, 16 + 9) = 21

Shortest path :

from (1,1) to any point (i, j)

1 3 6 
5 8 12 
12 16 21
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Can someone explain how to approach the problem?

Read about dynamic programming and go from there.

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Attempt:

Start with the first row and calculate the cumulative values and store them.
Proceed to the second row, now the values could have only come from the left or top (since you can only go left or down), calculate the smallest of the cumulative values for this row.
Iterate down the rows until the last and you'll be able to get the smallest value when you reach the last node.

I claim this algorithm is O(n) since if you use a 2 dimensional array you only need to access all fields at most twice (read from top, left) for read and once for write.

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Wouldn't that be O(n^2) since it's an n x n grid? –  user470379 Jan 13 '11 at 21:24
    
my n would be the total number of elements in your case N^2 –  user500074 Jan 14 '11 at 16:30
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If you want to go really fancy or have to operate on massive matrices, A* could also be an option.

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