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I have a string of raw HTTP and I would like to represent the fields in an object. Is there any way to parse the individual headers from an HTTP string?

'GET /search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=ergterst HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: www.google.com\r\nConnection: keep-alive\r\nAccept: application/xml,application/xhtml+xml,text/html;q=0.9,text/plain;q=0.8,image/png,*/*;q=0.5\r\nUser-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_6; en-US) AppleWebKit/534.13 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/9.0.597.45 Safari/534.13\r\nAccept-Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch\r\nAvail-Dictionary: GeNLY2f-\r\nAccept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8\r\n
[...]'
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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

how about using regular expression :

header = "Host: www.google.com\r\nConnection: keep-alive\r\nAccept: application/xml,application/xhtml+xml,text/html;q=0.9,text/plain;q=0.8,image/png,*/*;q=0.5\r\nUser-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_6; en-US) AppleWebKit/534.13 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/9.0.597.45 Safari/534.13\r\nAccept-Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch\r\nAvail-Dictionary: GeNLY2f-\r\nAccept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8\r\n"

print re.findall(r"(?P<name>.*?): (?P<value>.*?)\r\n", header)

this will output:

[('Host', 'www.google.com'),
 ('Connection', 'keep-alive'),
 ('Accept',
  'application/xml,application/xhtml+xml,text/html;q=0.9,text/plain;q=0.8,image/png,*/*;q=0.5'),
 ('User-Agent',
  'Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_6; en-US) AppleWebKit/534.13 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/9.0.597.45 Safari/534.13'),
 ('Accept-Encoding', 'gzip,deflate,sdch'),
 ('Avail-Dictionary', 'GeNLY2f-'),
 ('Accept-Language', 'en-US,en;q=0.8')]

you can also put them in a dictionary like this:

headers = dict(re.findall(r"(?P<name>.*?): (?P<value>.*?)\r\n", header))

print headers['Accept']
# 'application/xml,application/xhtml+xml,text/html;q=0.9,text/plain;q=0.8,image/png,*/*;q=0.5'
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6  
>Header fields can be extended over multiple lines by preceding each extra line with at least one SP or HT. tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2616#section-4.2 –  warvariuc Jun 3 '11 at 7:12
2  
@warvariuc: +1, i don't like my solution either, because as you mention their is too much to take in consideration, i will definitely use one of the two other solution that use mimetools. –  mouad Jun 3 '11 at 7:38
1  
@Cev: I don't think this answer should be accepted please reconsider TryPyPy or Brandom solution :) –  mouad Jun 3 '11 at 7:39
3  
also putting headers in a dict (what i wanted to do myself) i think is bad dea, because there are repeated headers (Set-Cookie), but dict keys are unique. –  warvariuc Jun 3 '11 at 18:36

There are excellent tools in the Standard Library both for parsing RFC 821 headers, and also for parsing entire HTTP requests. Here is an example request string (note that Python treats it as one big string, even though we are breaking it across several lines for readability) that we can feed to my examples:

request_text = (
    'GET /who/ken/trust.html HTTP/1.1\r\n'
    'Host: cm.bell-labs.com\r\n'
    'Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.3\r\n'
    'Accept: text/html;q=0.9,text/plain\r\n'
    '\r\n'
    )

As @TryPyPy points out, you can use mimetools.Message to parse the headers — though we should add that the resulting Message object acts like a dictionary of headers once you are done creating it:

# Ignore the request line and parse only the headers

from mimetools import Message
from StringIO import StringIO
request_line, headers_alone = request_text.split('\r\n', 1)
headers = Message(StringIO(headers_alone))

print len(headers)     # -> "3"
print headers.keys()   # -> ['accept-charset', 'host', 'accept']
print headers['Host']  # -> "cm.bell-labs.com"

But this, of course, ignores the request line, or makes you parse it yourself. It turns out that there is a much better solution.

The Standard Library will parse HTTP for you if you use its BaseHTTPRequestHandler. Though its documentation is a bit obscure — a problem with the whole suite of HTTP and URL tools in the Standard Library — all you have to do to make it parse a string is (a) wrap your string in a StringIO(), (b) read the raw_requestline so that it stands ready to be parsed, and (c) capture any error codes that occur during parsing instead of letting it try to write them back to the client (since we do not have one!).

So here is our specialization of the Standard Library class:

from BaseHTTPServer import BaseHTTPRequestHandler
from StringIO import StringIO

class HTTPRequest(BaseHTTPRequestHandler):
    def __init__(self, request_text):
        self.rfile = StringIO(request_text)
        self.raw_requestline = self.rfile.readline()
        self.error_code = self.error_message = None
        self.parse_request()

    def send_error(self, code, message):
        self.error_code = code
        self.error_message = message

Again, I wish the Standard Library folks had realized that HTTP parsing should be broken out in a way that did not require us to write nine lines of code to properly call it, but what can you do? Here is how you would use this simple class:

# Using this new class is really easy!

request = HTTPRequest(request_text)

print request.error_code       # None  (check this first)
print request.command          # "GET"
print request.path             # "/who/ken/trust.html"
print request.request_version  # "HTTP/1.1"
print len(request.headers)     # 3
print request.headers.keys()   # ['accept-charset', 'host', 'accept']
print request.headers['host']  # "cm.bell-labs.com"

If there is an error during parsing, the error_code will not be None:

# Parsing can result in an error code and message

request = HTTPRequest('GET\r\nHeader: Value\r\n\r\n')

print request.error_code     # 400
print request.error_message  # "Bad request syntax ('GET')"

I prefer using the Standard Library like this because I suspect that they have already encountered and resolved any edge cases that might bite me if I try re-implementing an Internet specification myself with regular expressions.

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This is awesome, thanks! However, I need to maintain the order of HTTP header filed info (dictionaries do not maintain order). Is there anyway to do this? –  jeffrey Nov 14 '14 at 23:03
1  
I am not sure! Deep inside of the Message and request classes that Python uses to do this parsing should be, I suppose, a line of code that creates the dictionary of headers. If it could be told to instead use an OrderedDict instead of a plain dict then you would know the order — but, having just toured the code briefly, I could not tell where the header dictionary was created. –  Brandon Rhodes Nov 17 '14 at 22:55

This seems to work fine if you strip the GET line:

import mimetools
from StringIO import StringIO

he = "Host: www.google.com\r\nConnection: keep-alive\r\nAccept: application/xml,application/xhtml+xml,text/html;q=0.9,text/plain;q=0.8,image/png,*/*;q=0.5\r\nUser-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_6; en-US) AppleWebKit/534.13 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/9.0.597.45 Safari/534.13\r\nAccept-Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch\r\nAvail-Dictionary: GeNLY2f-\r\nAccept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8\r\n"

m = mimetools.Message(StringIO(he))

print m.headers

A way to parse your example and add information from the first line to the object would be:

import mimetools
from StringIO import StringIO

he = 'GET /search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=ergterst HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: www.google.com\r\nConnection: keep-alive\r\n'

# Pop the first line for further processing
request, he = he.split('\r\n', 1)    

# Get the headers
m = mimetools.Message(StringIO(he))

# Add request information
m.dict['method'], m.dict['path'], m.dict['http-version'] = request.split()    

print m['method'], m['path'], m['http-version']
print m['Connection']
print m.headers
print m.dict
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Is there a way to do this in python3? –  Broseph Apr 17 '14 at 5:37
    
mimetools is deprecated since 2.3 –  demented hedgehog Oct 8 '14 at 6:35

httpheader looks like the right tool

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Unfortunately, I couldn't seem to get httpheader to parse a string of that type correctly. –  Cev Jan 13 '11 at 21:18
    
Maybe it's because you've got more than just headers there? You've got a request line as well. If you tacked an additional \r\n on the end of your string, it would be a full HTTP request. You're probably better off recycling existing code from WebOb or Django than writing something from scratch. –  Jim Jan 13 '11 at 22:10
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Rostyslav Dzinko Aug 17 '12 at 12:12

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