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I'm going mad (or maybe I just need to go bed :) ) with stuff reported below. The markup is the following:

<div class="mask">
    <div id="content-1" class="content-item">
        Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit...
    </div>
    <div id="content-2" class="content-item">
        Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit...
    </div> 
</div>

and this is the css

.mask{
    position:absolute;
    width:300px;
    height:300px;
    overflow-x:hidden;
}
.content-item{
    position:absolute;
    width:300px;
}
#content-1{
    left:10px;
}
#content-2{
    left:305px;
}

Fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/steweb/9zMhY/ (without a fixed height)

I need a mask just because I want to make a transition from content-1 to content-2. There are no problems about the transition itself (content-1 morphs to -300px left and content-2 morphs to 0px left). Above you can see that height is set to 300px, and overflow-x:hidden work as expected!

BUT I don't want to set an height to the mask! Well, If I remove height I can't see anything, just removing overflow-x:hidden everything appears.

The question is: without changing the positioning method (I need absolute positioning, with float would be much easier), how could I obtain a simple overflow-x without setting a fixed height?? Why is overflow-x:hidden hiding everything instead of hiding just everything on the left/right??

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The box model of absolutely positioned elements doesn't influence their parent containers.

Thats very logical because they are just not inside but absolute. Everthing else would be weird.

However floating elements behave the same way, which is often inconvinient.

A common practice to fix this is a "clearfix" .

You can put something like at the bottom of your parent container.

Another way is to set the height manually. I am not exactly sure what you want to do but do you really need the children to be absolute?

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I need the children to be absolute, because the structure inside of it is a lil bit complicated and there's not just 1 depth level (in the example I've just simplified it at the minimum) and I want to navigate this structure by sliding it. I can't understand why overflow-x:hidden hides everything :). P.s. I cannot set an height, because the content is dynamic –  stecb Jan 13 '11 at 21:43
    
@steweb. then the clearfix is your only option. –  The Surrican Jan 14 '11 at 13:46
    
As far as I know clearfix regards floating elements inside a container, so I have to change positioning from absolute to float. –  stecb Jan 14 '11 at 13:56
    
no, it works with absolute as well. fiddle here: jsfiddle.net/v9dx6 –  The Surrican Jan 14 '11 at 14:40
    
Sorry, I didn't notice your reply :) ..cool, it works ;) thank you! –  stecb Jan 17 '11 at 10:23

The mask loses its height because you position absolute its children.

If you take this out it will work:

.content-item{
   position:absolute;
   width:300px;
}

Div's are block elements which means they inherit the with from their parents so there is no need you set the with to 300. The aprent is already absolute why are you using absolute for the child div?.

jsfiddle link: http://jsfiddle.net/9zMhY/3/

share|improve this answer
    
because I need to re-position child elements. I need them to be absolute as I want to make transition between them and the content structure is not just 1 level in depth. –  stecb Jan 13 '11 at 21:50

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