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a linear linked list is a set of nodes. This is how a node is defined (to keep it easy we do not distinguish between node an list):

class Node{
    Object data;
    Node link;

    public Node(Object pData, Node pLink){
        this.data = pData;
        this.link = pLink;
    }

    public String toString(){
        if(this.link != null){
            return this.data.toString() + this.link.toString();
        }else{
            return this.data.toString() ;
        }
    }

    public void inc(){
        this.data = new Integer((Integer)this.data + 1);
    }

    public void lappend(Node list){
        Node child = this.link;
        while(child != null){
            child = child.link;
        }
        child.link = list;
    }

    public Node copy(){
        if(this.link != null){
            return new Node(new Integer((Integer)this.data), this.link.copy());
        }else{
            return new Node(new Integer((Integer)this.data), null);
        }
    }

    public Node invert(){
        Node child = this.link;
        while(child != null){
            child = child.link;
        }
        child.link = this;....
    }
}

I am able to make a deep copy of the list. Now I want to invert the list so that the first node is the last and the last the first. The inverted list has to be a deep copy.

I started developing the invert function but I am not sure. Any Ideas?

Update: Maybe there is a recursive way since the linear linked list is a recursive data structure.

I would take the first element, iterate through the list until I get to a node that has no child and append the first element, I would repeat this for the second, third....

share|improve this question
2  
If you need bidirectional traversal, you could doubly link the list. – time4tea Jan 13 '11 at 22:28
    
possible duplicate of Reversing a Linked List in Java, recursively – Don Roby Jan 13 '11 at 22:44
    
If you search stackoverflow for the phrase "reverse linked list" you will find many answers, some in Java. – Don Roby Jan 13 '11 at 22:45
    
I think that recursion, though a really cool way to think (and definitely good if you're trying to stretch how you think about a problem), isn't necessary. Think along the lines of stacks and queues.:) – Davidann Jan 13 '11 at 22:46
    
@skaffman deep-copy doesn't apply to reversing a collection/list. In the best case it could be considered a shallow copy. – bestsss Jan 14 '11 at 23:04
up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's a great recursive solution to this problem based on the following observations:

  1. The reverse of the empty list is the empty list.
  2. The reverse of a singleton list is itself.
  3. The reverse of a list of a node N followed by a list L is the reverse of the list L followed by the node N.

You can therefore implement the reverse function using pseudocode along these lines:

void reverseList(Node node) {
    if (node == null) return;      // Reverse of empty list is itself.
    if (node.next == null) return; // Reverse of singleton list is itself.

    reverseList(node.next); // Reverse the rest of the list
    appendNodeToList(node, node.next); // Append the new value.
}

A naive implementation of this algorithm runs in O(n2), since each reversal requires an append, which requires an O(n) scan over the rest of the list. However, you can actually get this working in O(n) using a clever observation. Suppose that you have a linked list that looks like this:

n1 --> n2 --> [rest of the list]

If you reverse the list beginning at n2, then you end up with this setup:

n1       [reverse of rest of the list] --> n2
 |                                          ^
 +------------------------------------------+

So you can append n1 to the reverse of the rest of the list by setting n1.next.next = n1, which changes n2, the new end of the reverse list, to point at n1:

[reverse of the rest of the list] --> n2 --> n1

And you're golden! Again more pseudocode:

void reverseList(Node node) {
    if (node == null) return;      // Reverse of empty list is itself.
    if (node.next == null) return; // Reverse of singleton list is itself.

    reverseList(node.next); // Reverse the rest of the list
    node.next.next = node; // Append the new value.
}

EDIT: As Ran pointed out, this uses the call stack for its storage space and thus risks a stack overflow. If you want to use an explicit stack instead, you can do so like this:

void reverseList(Node node) {
    /* Make a stack of the reverse of the nodes. */
    Stack<Node> s = new Stack<Node>();
    for (Node curr = node; node != null; node = node.next)
        s.push(curr);

    /* Start unwinding it. */
    Node curr = null;
    while (!s.empty()) {
        Node top = s.pop();

        /* If there is no node in the list yet, set it to the current node. */
        if (curr == null)
            curr = top;
        /* Otherwise, have the current node point to this next node. */
        else
            curr.next = top;

        /* Update the current pointer to be this new node. */
        curr = top;
    }
}

I believe that this similarly inverts the linked list elements.

share|improve this answer
1  
In any real application, this approach is very unrecommended. Note that this solution has a memory cost which is O(n) where n is the number of nodes. Even worse, all this memory is on the stack, not the heap - meaning that for long lists you will crash with stack overflows. – Ran Jan 13 '11 at 22:41
    
@Ran- Very true. I'll add a comment about how to use an explicit stack if that's what's necessary. – templatetypedef Jan 13 '11 at 22:43
    
why not use the O(1) solution instead...? :) – Ran Jan 13 '11 at 22:44
    
@Ran- I guess we're solving different problems. If you want to reorder the nodes, I don't know of a way to do it in O(1); is there a famous solution to this? If you want to copy the nodes, then you can do it with O(n) memory (for the copy) but only O(1) overhead. Is that what you were referring to? – templatetypedef Jan 13 '11 at 22:46
1  
I thought the question here was how to reverse a linked list. Isn't it? If it is, then yes it can be done using O(1) memory. See my answer... – Ran Jan 13 '11 at 22:54

I sometimes ask this question in interviews...

I would not recommend using a recursive solution, or using a stack to solve this. There's no point in allocating O(n) memory for such a task.

Here's a simple O(1) solution (I didn't run it right now, so I apologize if it needs some correction).

Node reverse (Node current) {

    Node prev = null;

    while (current != null) {
        Node nextNode = current.next;
        current.next = prev;
        prev = current;
        current = nextNode;
    }

    return prev;
}

BTW: Does the lappend method works? It seems like it would always throw a NullReferenceException.

share|improve this answer
    
It appears that you're having to iterate through the entire length of the list in order to reverse it. How is this a O(n) solution? – Davidann Jan 14 '11 at 0:16
1  
@David: O(1) memory, not time. – Ran Jan 14 '11 at 6:09
    
@Ran, you missed delinking the first node's next to null. – Zaki May 4 '12 at 15:55

I would treat the current list as a stack (here's my pseudo code):

Node x = copyOf(list.head);
x.link = null;
foreach(node in list){
    Node temp = copyOf(list.head);
    temp.link = x;
    x = temp;        
}

At the end x will be the head of the reversed list.

share|improve this answer

I more fammiliar whit C, but still let me try. ( I just do not sure if this runs in Java, but it should)

node n = (well first one)
node prev = NULL;
node t;
while(n != NULL)
{
     t = n.next;
     n.next = prev;
     prev = n;
     n = t;
}
share|improve this answer

Reversing a single-linked list is sort of a classic question. It's answered here as well (and well answered), it does not requires recursion nor extra memory, besides a register (or 2) for reference keeping. However to the OP, I guess it's a school project/homework and some piece of advice, if you ever get to use single linked list for some real data storage, consider using a tail node as well. (as of now single linked lists are almost extinct, HashMap buckets comes to mind, though). Unless you have to check all the nodes for some condition during 'add', tail is quite an improvement. Below there is some code that features the reverse method and a tail node.

package t1;

public class SList {
    Node head = new Node(); 
    Node tail = head;

    private static class Node{
        Node link;
        int data;           
    }


    void add(int i){
        Node n = new Node();
        n.data = i;
        tail = tail.link =n;        
    }

    void reverse(){
        tail = head;
        head = reverse(head);
        tail.link = null;//former head still links back, so clear it
    }

    private static Node reverse(Node head){            
        for (Node n=head.link, link; n!=null; n=link){//essentially replace head w/ the next and relink
            link = n.link;
            n.link = head;
            head = n;           
        }
        return head;
    }

    void print(){
        for (Node n=head; n!=null;n=n.link){
            System.out.println(n.data);
        }       
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SList l = new SList();
        l.add(1);l.add(2);l.add(3);l.add(4);
        l.print();
        System.out.println("==");
        l.reverse();
        l.print();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I was wondering something like that(I didnt test it, so):

invert(){
  m(firstNode, null);
}

m(Node v, Node bef){
  if(v.link != null)
   m(v.link,v);
  else
   v.link=bef;
}
share|improve this answer

Without much testing,

Node head = this;
Node middle = null;
Node trail = null;
while (head != null) {
    trail = middle;
    middle = head;
    head = head.link;
    middle.link = trail;
}
head = middle;
return head;
share|improve this answer
public ListNode Reverse(ListNode list)
{
    if (list == null) return null; 

    if (list.next == null) return list; 

    ListNode secondElem = list.next;

    ListNode reverseRest = Reverse(secondElem);

    secondElem.Next = list;

    return reverseRest;
}

Hope this helps.

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