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I have the following XSLT node:

<xsl:for-each select="Book[title != 'Moby Dick']">
....
</xsl:for-each>

However, I'd like use multiple filters in the for-each. I've tried the following, but it doesn't seem to work:

<!-- Attempt #1 -->
<xsl:for-each select="Book[title != 'Moby Dick'] or Book[author != 'Rowling'] ">
....
</xsl:for-each>


<!-- Attempt #2 -->
<xsl:for-each select="Book[title != 'Moby Dick' or author != 'Rowling']">
....
</xsl:for-each>
share|improve this question
    
you should provide XML sample. – Flack Jan 13 '11 at 23:34
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for explanation and several one-liner solutions. :) – Dimitre Novatchev Jan 14 '11 at 3:04
up vote 16 down vote accepted

However, I'd like use multiple filters in the for-each

Your real question is an XPath one: Is it possible, and how, to specify more than one condition inside a predicate?

Answer:

Yes, use the standard XPath boolean operators or and and and the standard XPath function not().

In this particular case, the XPath in the select attribute may be:

Book[title != 'Moby Dick' or author != 'Rowling']

I personally would always prefer to write an equivalent expression:

Book[not(title = 'Moby Dick') or not(author = 'Rowling')]

because the != operator has a non-intuitive behavior when one of its operands is a node-set.

But I am guessing that what you probably wanted was to and the two comparissons -- not to or them.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Complete and excellent answer. – user357812 Jan 14 '11 at 13:54
    
If you get a chance, would you mind explaining or linking to an explanation about the != operator's non-intuitive behavior? Thanks! – Neil Whitaker May 10 '11 at 21:54
    
@Neil Whitaker: if at least one of the operands of the != operator is a node-set (or a node-set or a sequence in XPath 2.0), then it is possible that both $arg1 = $arg2 and $arg1 != $arg2 are true at the same time. Just read the definition of the != operator. This is avoided if you use not($arg1 = $arg2) – Dimitre Novatchev May 10 '11 at 23:42
1  
Thanks. And wow! – Neil Whitaker May 17 '11 at 22:29

If you want multiple predicates, the simplest way is just to use multiple predicates. I'm guessing you really want an "and" rather than an "or":

<xsl:for-each select="Book[title != 'Moby Dick'][author != 'Rowling'] ">
....
</xsl:for-each>

Generally the != operator is best avoided, because it has unexpected effects when the author is absent or when there are multiple authors. It's better to write:

<xsl:for-each select="Book[not(title = 'Moby Dick')][not(author = 'Rowling')] ">
....
</xsl:for-each>
share|improve this answer

Apparently, I forgot to refresh my data. Attempt #2 works perfectly fine. Hopefully this example helps someone else.

<!-- Attempt #2 -->
<xsl:for-each select="Book[title != 'Moby Dick' or author != 'Rowling']">
....
</xsl:for-each>
share|improve this answer
    
@Dimitre - if Rowling had written a book called Moby Dick, the predicate would surely be false for that book? – Michael Kay Jan 14 '11 at 8:54
    
@Michael: Of course you are right. I probably was thinking that the same element was participating in two != comparisons with different values, which comparisons were then or-ed. Must have been quite tired last night... Anyway, I removed a similar statement from my answer. Thank you. – Dimitre Novatchev Jan 14 '11 at 13:47

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