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I'm writing REST web app (Netbean6.9, JAX-RS, Toplink-essential) and trying to return JSON and Http status code.

I have code ready and working just to return JSON when HTTP GET Method is called from client.

Code snippet

 @Path("get/id")
    @GET
    @Produces("application/json")
    public M_機械 getMachineToUpdate(@PathParam("id") String id) {

        //some code to return JSON
        .
        .
        return myJson

But I also want to return HTTP status code (500, 200, 204 etc) along with returning JSON.

I tried using HttpServletResponse object,

response.sendError("error message", 500);

But this made browser to think it's real 500 so output web page was regular Http 500 error page.

What I want to is just to return status code so that my Javascript on client side can handle some logic depending on what HTTP status code is returned. (maybe just to display the error code and message on html page.)

Is it possible to do so? or should HTTP status code not be used for such thing?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 76 down vote accepted

Here's an example:

@GET
@Path("retrieve/{uuid}")
public Response retrieveSomething(@PathParam("uuid") String uuid) {
    if(uuid == null || uuid.trim().length() == 0) {
        return Response.serverError().entity("UUID cannot be blank").build();
    }
    Entity entity = service.getById(uuid);
    if(entity == null) {
        return Response.status(Response.Status.NOT_FOUND).entity("Entity not found for UUID: " + uuid).build();
    }
    String json = //convert entity to json
    return Response.ok(json, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON).build();
}

Take a look at the Response class.

Note that you should always specify a content type, especially if you are passing multiple content types, but if every message will be represented as JSON, you can just annotate the method with @Produces("application/json")

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Thanks for the tip, it works! :D –  masato-san Jan 14 '11 at 7:27
1  
It works, but what I don't like about the Response return value is that in my opinion it pollutes your code, specially regarding to any client trying to use it. If you provide an interface returning a Response to a third party, he does not know what type are you really returning. Spring makes it more clear with an annotation, very useful if you always return a status code (i.e. HTTP 204) –  Guido García Nov 14 '12 at 16:48
6  
Making that class generic (Response<T>) would be an interesting improvement to jax-rs, to have the advantages of both alternatives. –  Guido García Nov 14 '12 at 17:07
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The answer by hisdrewness will work, but it modifies the whole approach to letting a provider such as Jackson+JAXB automatically convert your returned object to some output format such as JSON. Inspired by an Apache CFX post (which uses a CFX-specific class) I've found one way to set the response code that should work in any JAX-RS implementation: inject an HttpServletResponse context and manually set the response code. For example, here is how to set the response code to CREATED when appropriate.

@Path("/foos/{fooId}")
@PUT
@Consumes("application/json")
@Produces("application/json")
public Foo setFoo(@PathParam("fooID") final String fooID, final Foo foo, @Context final HttpServletResponse response)
{
  //TODO store foo in persistent storage
  if(itemDidNotExistBefore) //return 201 only if new object; TODO app-specific logic
  {
    response.setStatus(Response.Status.CREATED.getStatusCode());
  }
  return foo;  //TODO get latest foo from storage if needed
}
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You can actually combine the approaches: annotate the method with @Produces, and don't specify the media type in the final Response.ok, and you'll get your return object correctly JAXB-serialized into the appropriate media type to match the request. (I just tried this with a single method that could return either XML or JSON: the method itself doesn't need to mention either, except in the @Produces annotation.) –  Royston Shufflebotham Sep 26 '12 at 21:31
    
You are right Garret. My example was more of an illustration of the emphasis of providing a content type. Our approaches are similar, but the idea of using a MessageBodyWriter and Provider allows for implicit content negotiation, although it seems your example is missing some code. Here's another answer I provided that illustrates this: stackoverflow.com/questions/5161466/… –  hisdrewness Dec 4 '12 at 20:38
1  
I'm unable to override the status code in response.setStatus(). The only way to send for example a 404 Not Found response is to set the response status code response.setStatus(404) en then close the output stream response.getOutputStream().close() so JAX-RS cannot reset my status. –  Rob Juurlink Oct 18 '13 at 8:45
1  
I was able to use this approach to set a 201 code, but had to add a try-catch block with response.flushBuffer() in order to avoid the framework overriding my response code. Not very clean. –  Pierre Henry Apr 3 at 15:40
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There are several use cases for setting HTTP status codes in a REST web service, and at least one was not sufficiently documented in the existing answers (i.e. when you are using auto-magical JSON/XML serialization using JAXB, and you want to return an object to be serialized, but also a status code different than the default 200).

So let me try and enumerate the different use cases and the solutions for each one:

1. Error code (500, 404,...)

The most common use case when you want to return a status code different than 200 OK is when an error occurs.

For example :

  • an entity is requested but it doesn't exist (404)
  • the request is semantically incorrect (400)
  • the user is not authorized (401)
  • there is a problem with the database connection (500)
  • etc..

a) Throw and exception

In that case, I think that the cleanest way to handle the problem is to throw an exception. This exception will be handled by an ExceptionMapper, that will translate the exception into a response with the appropriate error code.

You can use the default ExceptionMapper that comes pre-configured with Jersey (and I guess it's the same with other implementations) and throw any of the existing sub-classes of javax.ws.rs.WebApplicationException. These are pre-defined exception types that are pre-mapped to different error codes, for example :

  • BadRequestException (400)
  • InternalServerErrorException (500)
  • NotFoundException (404)

Etc. You can find the list here : API

Alternatively you can define your own custom exceptions and ExceptionMapper classes, and add these mappers to Jersey by the mean of the @Provider annotation (source of this example) :

public class MyApplicationException extends Exception implements Serializable
{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    public MyApplicationException() {
        super();
    }
    public MyApplicationException(String msg)   {
        super(msg);
    }
    public MyApplicationException(String msg, Exception e)  {
        super(msg, e);
    }
}

Provider :

    @Provider
    public class MyApplicationExceptionHandler implements ExceptionMapper<MyApplicationException> 
    {
        @Override
        public Response toResponse(MyApplicationException exception) 
        {
            return Response.status(Status.BAD_REQUEST).entity(exception.getMessage()).build();  
        }
    }

Note : you can also write ExceptionMappers for existing exception types that you use.

b) Use the Response builder

Another way to set a status code is to use a Response builder to build a response with the intended code.

In that case, your method's return type must be javax.ws.rs.core.Response. This is described in various other responses such as hisdrewness' accepted answer and looks like this :

@GET
@Path("myresource({id}")
public Response retrieveSomething(@PathParam("id") String id) {
    ...
    Entity entity = service.getById(uuid);
    if(entity == null) {
        return Response.status(Response.Status.NOT_FOUND).entity("Resource not found for ID: " + uuid).build();
    }
    ...
}

2. Success, but not 200

Another case when you want to set the return status is when the operation was successful, but you want to return a success code different than 200, along with the content that you return in the body.

A frequent use case is when you create a new entity (POST request) and want to return info about this new entity or mabe the entity itself, together with a 201 Created status code.

One approach is to use the response object just like described above, and set the body of the request yourself. However by doing this you loose the ability to use the automatic serialization to XML or JSON provided by JAXB.

This is the original method returning an entity object that will be serialized to JSON by JAXB:

@Path("/")
@POST
@Consumes({ MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON })
@Produces({ MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON })
public User addUser(User user){
    User newuser = ... do something like DB insert ...
    return newuser;
}

This will return a JSON representation of the newly created user, but the return status will be 200, not 201.

Now the problem is if I want to use the Response builder to set the return code, I have to return a Response object in my method. How do I still return the User object to be serialized ?

a) Set the code on the servlet response

One approach to solve this is to obtain a servlet request object and set the response code manually ourselves, like demonstrated in Garett Wilson's answer :

@Path("/")
@POST
@Consumes({ MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON })
@Produces({ MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON })
public User addUser(User user, @Context final HttpServletResponse response){

    User newUser = ...

    //set HTTP code to "201 Created"
    response.setStatus(HttpServletResponse.SC_CREATED);
    try {
        response.flushBuffer();
    }catch(Exception e){}

    return newUser;
}

The method still returns an entity object and the status code will be 201.

Note that to make it work, I had to flush the response. This is an unpleasant resurgence of low-level Servlet API code in our nice JAX_RS resource, and much worse, it causes the headers to be unmodifiable after this because they were already sent on the wire.

b) Use the response object with the entity

The best solution in that case is to use the Response object, and set the entity to be serialized on this response object. It would be nice to make the Response object generic to indicate the type of the payload entity in that case, but is not the currently the case.

@Path("/")
@POST
@Consumes({ MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON })
@Produces({ MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON })
public Response addUser(User user){

    User newUser = ...

    return Response.created(hateoas.buildLinkUri(newUser, "entity")).entity(restResponse).build();
}

In that case we use the created method of the Response builder class in order to set the stratus code to 201. We pass the entity object (user) to the response via the entity() method.

The result is that the HTTP code is 401 as we wanted, and the body of the response is the exact same JSON as we had before when we just returned the User object. It also adds a location header.

The Response class has a number of builder method for different statuses (stati ?) such as :

Response.accepted() Response.ok() Response.noContent() Response.notAcceptable()

NB: the hateoas object is a helper class that I developed to help generate resources URIs. You will need to come up with your own mechanism here ;)

That's about it.

I hope this lengthy response helps somebody :)

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JAX-RS has support for standard/custom HTTP codes. See ResponseBuilder and ResponseStatus, for example:

http://jackson.codehaus.org/javadoc/jax-rs/1.0/javax/ws/rs/core/Response.ResponseBuilder.html#status%28javax.ws.rs.core.Response.Status%29

Keep in mind that JSON information is more about the data associated with the resource/application. The HTTP codes are more about the status of the CRUD operation being requested. (at least that is how it's supposed to be in REST-ful systems)

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Thanks for the tip! –  masato-san Jan 14 '11 at 7:27
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In case you want to change the status code because of an exception, with JAX-RS 2.0 you can implement an ExceptionMapper like this. This handles this kind of exception for the whole app.

@Provider
public class UnauthorizedExceptionMapper implements ExceptionMapper<EJBAccessException> {

    @Override
    public Response toResponse(EJBAccessException exception) {
        return Response.status(Response.Status.UNAUTHORIZED.getStatusCode()).build();
    }

}
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If your WS-RS needs raise an error why not just use the WebApplicationException?

@GET
@Produces({ MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON, MediaType.APPLICATION_XML })
@Path("{id}")
public MyEntity getFoo(@PathParam("id") long id,  @QueryParam("lang")long idLanguage) {

if (idLanguage== 0){
    // No URL parameter idLanguage was sent
    ResponseBuilder builder = Response.status(Response.Status.BAD_REQUEST);
    builder.entity("Missing idLanguage parameter on request");
    Response response = builder.build();
    throw new WebApplicationException(response);
    }
... //other stuff to return my entity
return myEntity;
}
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In my opinion WebApplicationExceptions are not suitable for client side errors because they throw big stack traces. Client errors should not throw server side stack traces and pollute the logging with it. –  Rob Juurlink Oct 18 '13 at 8:29
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Please look at the example here, it best illustrates the problem and how it is solved in the latest (2.3.1) version of Jersey.

https://jersey.java.net/documentation/latest/representations.html#d0e3586

It basically involves defining a custom Exception and keeping the return type as the entity. When there is an error, the exception is thrown, otherwise, you return the POJO.

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I would like to add that the example of interest is the one where they define their own exception class and build a Response in it. Just look for the CustomNotFoundException class and maybe copy it to your post. –  JBert Mar 3 at 16:32
    
I use this approach for errors and I like it. But it is no applicable to success codes (different then 200) such as '201 created'. –  Pierre Henry Apr 3 at 15:19
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I'm not using JAX-RS, but I've got a similar scenario where I use:

response.setStatus(HttpStatus.INTERNAL_SERVER_ERROR.value());
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Thanks, I'm not sure if setting status would make browser throw error page tho.. –  masato-san Jan 14 '11 at 7:29
    
It does for me using Spring MVC but there is an easy way to find out! –  Caps Jan 17 '11 at 1:42
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