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I am confused about the memory allocation in C++ in terms of the memory areas such as Const data area, Stack, Heap, Freestore, Heap and Global/Static area. I would like to understand the memory allocation pattern in the following snippet. Can anyone help me to understand this. If there any thing more apart from the variable types mentioned in the example to help understand the concept better please alter the example.

class FooBar
{
      int n; //Stored in stack?

      public:

          int pubVar; //stored in stack?

          void foo(int param)  //param stored in stack
          {
                int *pp = new int; //int is allocated on heap.
                n = param;
                static int nStat;  //Stored in static area of memory
                int nLoc;          //stored in stack?
                string str = "mystring"; //stored in stack?
                ..
                if(CONDITION)
                {
                    static int nSIf; //stored in static area of memory
                    int loopvar;     //stored in stack
                    ..
                }
          }
}

int main(int)
{
     Foobar bar;    //bar stored in stack? or a part of it?

     Foobar *pBar;  //pBar is stored in stack

     pBar = new Foobar();  //the object is created in heap?  What part of the object is stored on heap

}

EDIT:
What confuses me is, if pBar = new Foobar(); stores the object on the heap, how come int nLoc; and int pubVar;, that are components of the object stored on stack? Sounds contradictory to me. Shouldn't the lifetime of pubvar and pBar be the same?

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The best idea is stop thinking about heap and stack. They don't really exist in C++ (its a Java/C# construct).Think about lifespan (duration) of an object. –  Loki Astari Jan 14 '11 at 7:11
2  
Waitaminute. The stack is a Java construct?! Definitely not. It's a C construct, if not older. But setjmp/longjmp made it very clear that C has a stack. Java on the other hand allows objects to escape function scope, which is why the stack concept there doesn't exists (wrt memory; exceptions are another matter) –  MSalters Jan 14 '11 at 8:47
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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

"Heap" and "stack" are outmoded, inaccurate and confusing terms relating to storage duration.

Objects with "automatic storage duration" are what silly people call "stack objects". They're the ones that you will define inside a function as "local variables". They go out of scope when their enclosing block ends.

Objects with "dynamic storage duration" are those that you create on the free store with the aid of the keyword new (or, if you're silly, malloc), and then destroy whenever you like with the keyword delete (or, if you're silly, free).

There are also objects with "static storage duration" that are subject to all sorts of bizarre rules of initialisation order and things. We tend not to use them in idiomatic C++ as much as we can help it.

As for the specific variables in your code example, your comments are all accurate, despite the failure in terminology.

Addendum:

The terms "heap" and "stack" are outdated, relating to back when the most popular runtime libraries used these data structures to store objects which were dynamically- and automatically-allocated, respectively (statically-allocated objects fit into neither category, incidentally).

These days that is not always true, and it's certainly not mandated by the C++ standard, which does not care where things are stored. It only cares about how they are created and destroyed, and about how long they live.

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1  
Actually, note that class members with automatic duration may not be on the physical "stack" (if such a thing even exists), if the encapsulating class was allocated on the "heap" (if such a thing even exists). Another good example of why you should not use these terms. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 2:06
1  
I think n and pubVar are stored in the heap, as part of the container object. –  Ariel Jan 14 '11 at 2:09
10  
BTW - Tomalak, while your comments are mostly accurate, it's non good to treat people as stupid or anything like that. Sounds like you are in the pedestal of wise people while we, mundane arcanes prototypes of intelligent life, are contemplating your majesty. Please, save those words from those who deserve it, which are not those who mistakenly call "stack objects" those that are stored in the stack precisely ☺ –  Ariel Jan 14 '11 at 2:12
2  
@Mahatma: Aside from the fact that you've evidently completely ignored everything I said about the term "heap", actually no. The pointer pp is not a member of the class Foobar; it's just a local variable of a function. Despite appearances, member functions aren't really "inside" a class; certainly not in terms of storage. The "fall-through" of "heap-ness" only applies to actual member variables. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 4:10
2  
Is it that upsetting that people use "stack" and "heap"? Over time, words can take on meaning beyond what they literally represent. People associate them as such, and it's very condescending to just label them as misguided. Countless words in the English language have adopted meanings entirely removed from their origins. –  Toolbox Jan 14 '11 at 4:57
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I've updated your annotations with what I believe is more correct. Note that Tomalak is correct that 'stack' and 'heap' are not specified by the standard, and mechanisms other than a stack might be used to pass parameters to store automatic variables.

However, I still use those terms because they are actually used quite often in compiler implementations, the terms are more or less well-understood (or easy to understand), and I think they still pragmatically illustrate what you're interested in knowing.

class Foobar
{
      int n; //Stored wherever the current object is stored
             //  (might be static memory, stack or heap depending 
             //  on how the object is allocated)

      public:

          int pubVar; //Stored wherever the current object is stored 
                      //  (might be static memory, stack or heap depending 
                      //  on how the object is allocated)

          void foo(int param)  //param stored in stack or register
          {
                int *pp = new int; //int is allocated on heap.
                n = param;
                static int nStat;  //Stored in static area of memory
                int nLoc;          //stored in stack or register
                string str = "mystring"; // `str` is stored in stack, however 
                                         //    the string object may also use heap 
                                         //    to manage its data
                ..
                if(CONDITION)
                {
                    static int nSIf; //stored in static area of memory
                    int loopvar;     //stored in stack or register
                    ..
                }
          }
}

int main(int)
{
     Foobar bar;    //bar stored in stack

     Foobar *pBar;  //pBar is stored in stack

     pBar = new Foobar();  //the object is created in heap.  
                           //   The non-static data members are stored in that
                           //   memory block.

}
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1  
They're ambiguous and confusing, unfortunately. It may well be the case that "most people" use them in this way, but that's hardly an argument to avoid the ambiguity. "Most people" think that Sydney is the capital of Australia; that does not in any way make it right. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 2:13
    
+1 A great, detailed, methodical explanation. –  templatetypedef Jan 14 '11 at 2:14
    
@Micheal "depending on how the object is allocated" is not clear to me. Do you mean the following distinction: Foobar bar; (//here object is allocated on stack) Foobar *pBar = new Foobar(); (//here object is allocated on heap) –  blitzkriegz Jan 14 '11 at 2:19
1  
@Mahatma: yes, that's what I mean. –  Michael Burr Jan 14 '11 at 2:24
    
While it's virtually impossible for memory allocated using the free store mechanism (i.e. new) to be on the stack, I'm not at all convinced that automatic variables will have to be found on the stack or in a register. I guess the implementation is free to put the on the heap just the same. Why would it want to do such thing is a whole new question, though... –  conio Jan 14 '11 at 2:31
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I agree with Tomalak,

C++ does not care where things are stored. It only cares about how they are constructed and destroyed, and about how long they live.

How it happens, is implementation defined, the compiler might optimize in such a way, that you won't have anything stored on the "stack" when you expect it. The way allocation on the heap happens is defined by the implementation of new/malloc or some third party function (new might call malloc).

What most likely will happen in your example, is this:

Foobar bar; // bar will *most likely* be allocated on the "stack".
Foobar *pBar; // pBar will *most likely* be allocated on the "stack".
pBar = new Foobar(); // pBar will stay as is, and point to the location on the "heap" where your memory is allocated by new.  

A few things that you might be wondering about. A C-style array, like int array[5] is not stored the same way as a int* pointer= new int[5], the second case will most likely use more memory, since it stores not only the memory for the array, but also memory on the "stack" for the pointer.

Static constants such as 5 and "cake" are usually stored in a separate .DATA section of the executable.

The important thing to understand when using C++, most of these things are implementation defined.

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Since you say most likely, can the allocation of /* Foobar bar; */ happen in the heap? –  blitzkriegz Jan 14 '11 at 2:23
1  
+1 for being mostly right. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 2:23
1  
@Mahatma: Absolutely. Depends where you write it! BTW on SO backticks can delimit code samples and format them for you. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 2:24
1  
@Mahatma: struct Foobar {}; struct Foo { Foobar bar; }; int main() { Foo* x = new Foo(); delete x; } -- the only Foobar in this program is in the free store, or "heap" as you put it.... even though within the context of Foo, it has automatic storage duration (which is why your instinct tells you, incorrectly, that it is on the imaginary "stack"). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 2:48
1  
@Michael I think it's that they don't use a heap. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 4:04
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Non-static data members are "inside" each instance of that class: whether that is on the stack or heap – or elsewhere – is unknown by just looking at the member in the class definition. It does not make sense to talk about the storage of non-static data members without talking about storage of the instance of the class to which they belong.

struct A {
  int n;  // you cannot say n is always on the stack, or always on the heap, etc.
};

int main() {
  A a;  // a is on the stack, so a.n is also on the stack
  A *p = new A();  // *p, which means the object pointed to by p, is on the heap,
                   // so p->n is also on the heap
                   // p itself is on the stack, just like a
  return 0;
}

A global;  // global is neither on the stack nor on the heap, so neither is global.n

"The stack" is where variables scoped to the lifetime of a single function invocation go; this is also called "automatic storage duration". There are various stack allocation strategies and, notably, each thread has its own stack – though which is "the" stack should be clear from context. There's interesting things happening with split stacks (which allow growing and shrinking), but in that case, it's still one stack split into multiple pieces.

"The heap" is only a misnomer in that "the" refers to the "main" heap, as used by malloc and various forms of new; this is also called "dynamic storage duration".

Global variables, static data members, and function-level statics belong to neither the stack nor heap; also called "static storage duration".

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