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In .NET, how do I Create a Junction in NTFS, as opposed to a Symlink?

I've tried Winbolic (Windows XP), but I can't get it to work the way I want.

Am I wrong here?

If I create a symbolic link within a folder in my %PATH%, the referenced directory should work as if it had actually been added to %PATH%, right?

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Don't tag not-programming-related. @cheeso –  Roger Pate May 24 '10 at 2:19
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NOTE: Windows 7 supports sysmlinks. –  guillermooo May 24 '10 at 6:28
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Duplicate question with better discussion at SuperUser: What are the various link types in Windows? How do I create them? –  mwolfe02 Sep 14 '13 at 3:05
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9 Answers

Have you looked at Junction? Also, Windows Vista introduced the mklink command line tool to create symbolic links. Scott Hanselman has a write-up on it at http://www.hanselman.com/blog/MoreOnVistaReparsePoints.aspx. If you're speaking solely about Windows XP, I've only ever used the Junction tool.

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works as required! Thanks. –  Jan Galinski May 10 '11 at 9:40
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Looks like another option could be the /J switch on mklink (like "mklink /J <JUNCTION> <DIR>"). Note that it isn't a separate executable, it is a command in cmd so if you're calling from PowerShell, you'll have to shell out to cmd (i.e. "cmd /c mklink /J <JUNCTION> <DIR>") –  David Mohundro May 10 '11 at 19:14
    
Wow junction works great. It creates a real symbolic link so even Cygwin will follow it. –  styfle Sep 19 '11 at 19:20
    
A junction worked great. Thanks. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 13 at 10:16
    
mklink was exactly what i was looking for. –  prolink007 Feb 14 at 17:49
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the referenced directory should work as if it had actually been added to %PATH%, right

No, if you had C:\bin added to your %PATH% and inside c:\bin you created a Junction called c:\bin\anotherDir\ to point to c:\anotherDir\ so that you could run some.exe from the command line like:

> anotherDir\some.exe

This would not work since the %PATH% variable does not work with sub directories (symlinked or not)

you would need to create a hardlink directly to some.exe, so the hardlink c:\bin\some.exe points to c:\anotherDir\some.exe

So in summary I don't believe you can do exactly what you are asking. That said I do recommend Link Shell Extension for creating Junctions and hardlinks. It offers more capabilities than most junction tools in a very easy to use windows explorer extension

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Try Symlinker a GUI tool to create Symlink in Windows works on all windows Versions

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Can it create symlinks on Windows XP? –  Sebastian Godelet Dec 11 '12 at 8:20
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Junction is a great utility but one thing to watch for is that junction points look exactly the same as ordinary folders in Windows Explorer.

Use 'junction.exe -s' on the command line to list all junctions in folders and sub-folders.

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I haven't heard of Winbolic but I'm not aware of anything built-in that will give you this functionality. Perhaps Winbolic just adds some functionality to explorer.exe to simulate symlinks, and this is why it's not working for you in other places?

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A few weeks ago I had the problem to make a symbolic link to a network share. This helped: http://www.pearlmagik.com/winbolic/ :

Winbolic Link creates special folders which serve as links to the contents of another folder. They are functionally similar to "symbolic links" or "symlinks" which unix users are familiar with.

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It should be noted that for links to a network share no actual symlink is created, but a Shell Folder: However, on the file system, the folder actually just contains two files that tell Windows to display the folder as though it is the target folder. Not all programs are aware of this type of link and may show as the content of the folder the two files instead of the content of the target folder. This is especially true for command line tools. –  mthomas Dec 1 '12 at 23:17
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Have you tried linkd from Windows 200x Resource Kit? I've heard that it does for pre-Vista versions of Windows same thing that mklink does for Vista which is what you are looking for.

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Windows uses shortcuts as symlinks; there isn't any other way (that I know of) to create the equivalent of a symlink.

The file system does support hard links, but Windows doesn't actually provide a way to do it. I believe sysinternals provides a mechanism for hard links, though.

EDIT: as @David Mohundro pointed out (while I was typing this), Junction is the thing I was thinking of from the sysinternals guys.

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The mklink command was introduced since Windows Vista. –  Dan Dascalescu Dec 3 '12 at 14:42
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do you mean a hard-link or a soft-link?

a soft-link you can create by drag-drop with right-button.

FSUTIL can be used on the command line

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Usage : fsutil hardlink create <new filename> <existing filename> Eg : fsutil hardlink create c:\foo.txt c:\bar.txt –  bdukes Oct 21 '08 at 16:12
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"a soft-link you can create by drag-drop with right-button." This is not right, by dragging and dropping you can create a shortcut to the file which is essentially a .lnk file and stores real file path info. The purpose of the file is to tell Windows Explorer and .lnk aware applications about the real file. It's not a soft-link or symbolic link. –  Emre Yazıcı Mar 7 '11 at 4:12
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