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I am new to programming and am trying to write a program that works out a percentage and then displays the answer formatted dependant on the result.

if(percent % 1 == 0.0)
{
    sw.Write(" {0}%", (int)percent);
}
else
{
sw.Write((" {0:f1}%", percent);

The percent values in this case are 11, 14, 12, 6 and 4. In all but 14 it displays as whole numbers but with 14 it displays as 14.0. If I watch percent the numbers will come up 11.0 12.0 etc but with 14 it is 14.000000000000004 and is therefore displaying incorrectly. Is this some quirk or am I just not programming it correctly? Regards Barry

share|improve this question
    
This appears to be happening only when percent is certain numbers - 7, 14 or 28 but not 21. All the other numbers are correct. Now I am really confused! Regards Barry – user575357 Jan 14 '11 at 10:24
    
What type is percent? And how are you getting the values? – Yogesh Jan 14 '11 at 10:41
    
Your example here does not produce the problem described if the type of percent is either int or double. What type is percent? Can you modify your example to actually demonstrate the problem? – Will Hughes Jan 14 '11 at 10:48
    
percent is a double and comes from a formula. The formula is numOfDogs/totalDogs * 100. numOfDogs is a double array (was originally an int array but made no difference) and totalDogs is a double. >>percent = numOfDogs[i] / totalDogs * 100; >>if (percent % 1 == 0.0) //(DoubleEquals(percent % 1, .0)) >>{ >>sw.Write(" {0}%", (int)percent); >>} >>else >>{ >>sw.Write(" {0:f1}%", percent); >>} >>lines = "<pre></pre>"; >>sw.WriteLine(lines); – user575357 Jan 14 '11 at 11:34

You should not compare floating values using operator ==.

I posted some code here that shows how it should be done.

EDIT

A full example:

class Program
{
    static double epsilon = 0.000001;

    static bool DoubleEquals(double value1, double value2)
    {
        return Math.Abs(value1 - value2) < epsilon;
    }

    static void Print(double percent, TextWriter sw)
    {
        if (DoubleEquals(percent % 1, .0))
        {
            sw.Write(" {0}%", (int)percent);
        }
        else
        {
            sw.Write(" {0:f1}%", percent);
        }
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Print(11.0, Console.Out);
        Print(14.000000000000004, Console.Out);
        Print(12.0, Console.Out);
        Print(6.0, Console.Out);
        Print(4.0, Console.Out);

        Console.Write("Press any key to continue . . . ");
        Console.ReadKey(true);
    }

of course, you have to adjust epsilon to a small enough value.

share|improve this answer
    
Did it work too? :) – Simone Jan 14 '11 at 9:10
    
Sorry having trouble with editor. I tried the code but it didn't work for me. When I used (!Double.Equals(percent,0)) it always comes up with a whole number even if it should be a decimal and when using (Double.Equals(percent,0) it always comes up with a decimal. Maybe as a beginner I am expecting too much. – user575357 Jan 14 '11 at 9:23
    
see edited answer. – Simone Jan 14 '11 at 10:36
    
Thank you. I did put that in and of course it works perfectly. I can see I have a very long way to go before I can program like this. As a beginner it seems as if it should be really simple to do these sort of things but obviously it takes a lot more knowledge than I have yet. Regards Barry – user575357 Jan 14 '11 at 12:24

If you are after fixed decimal places try these:

sw.Write(string.Format("{0:0.00}", percent)); 

http://www.csharp-examples.net/string-format-double/

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that will be very useful but I seem to be having problems with getting the numbers to compare the way I want them to rather than the final output at the moment. Regards Barry – user575357 Jan 14 '11 at 9:45

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