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What fonts do you use for programming, and for what language/IDE? I use Consolas for all my Visual Studio work, any other recommendations?

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locked by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 6:02

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Sep 26 '11 at 22:55

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Most answers to this question are "+1 for Consolas". If you had specified "only one answer per font" in your question, we could have used voting instead, the way the site was supposed to work. Just saying. –  bzlm Sep 28 '08 at 14:51
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this should definately be closed. –  baeltazor Nov 10 '09 at 15:38
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@bzlm: This site is not intended to be anything of the sort - it's a Q&A site, not a polling site. –  skaffman Jan 3 '10 at 0:07
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@skaffman: This is meant to be a wiki site; a resource. How is a list of good programming fonts not something that would be valuable for every programmer? Sure, polls are stupid, but this one is more of a resource list than a questionnaire. Voting to reopen. –  ryeguy Jan 5 '10 at 16:00
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114 Answers

Verdana - Variable width and easy to read on screen at small sizes.

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Back in my Mac LC days I swore by Monaco 9pt, mostly for it's slashed 0. I never quite got used to the default line-height though.

monaco sample

It's a little hard to track down in the original non-OS-X version.

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+1 for Consolas, together with a proper Color Scheme (I use the white one at the first screenshot)

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I never found a reason to stray from Courier New. I don't think I'd have a problem with any font so long as it's sans-serif. Mono-spaced fonts are nice for coding, too.

Courier New has serifs.

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...and is monospaced. –  Humphrey Bogart Jun 10 '09 at 0:47
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Lucida Sans Typewriter

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Another vote for Consolas. My favorite IDE font at the moment.

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Raize Font

The Raize Font is a clean, crisp, fixed-pitched sans serif screen font that is much easier to read than the fixed pitched fonts that come with Windows. Ideally suited for programming, scripting, html writing, etc., the Raize Font can be used in any IDE or text editor.

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Monaco, 11pt, antialias, on Mac OS X. Looks ever better, and crisper on darker backgrounds.

alt text

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Consolas. Italic for comments. Only way. Nahh just kidding, the best programming font is this! Here's your first C program:

The image link must not be working, tell me in a comment
Recommended for high readability.

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I'm going to make some enemies with this, but I actually use -- gasp -- a non-monospace font! I occasionally switch back to a monospace to disambiguate something, but mostly find that a good clean sans-serif font is easiest to read and doesn't waste screen estate.

An IDE with good syntax colouring helps.

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I second Consolas, Inconsolata, DejaVu Sans Mono, and Droid Sans Mono, with my preference going towards the Droid one.

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Neep Alt 13/17 is very good.

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My favourite is ProggyClean at 11px. I've been using it for 2-3 years and it's great for getting lots on screen without being painful to read. It deserves even more attention than the couple of mentions it's had so far:

The site has many variations including slashed zeroes, bold for function marks etc:

(As an aside, my most-loved favourite text editor, TextPad, allows you to have different fonts and font sizes for different file types, which is a really great feature.)

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Until I found ProggyTiny, I always made my own fonts using Softy. It's surprisingly easy, and might increase your productivity if you're annoyed by some features of your current font (like "Q is too similiar to 0").

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Bitstream vera sans, a Gnome font. I find its much clearer than Consolas, which is pretty good too.

alt text

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I use Terminuse in almost everything (Eclipse, putty and other terminals): http://fractal.csie.org/~eric/wiki/Terminus_font

I must say that I don't get it why most people use small fonts like 9pt, do you have 14" monitors or what?

For me the best way is to use font size that makes my monitor display at most one 30-40 line method, this way I need to create smaller methods :)

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I use MonteCarlo, which is based on ProFont but has a bold face too. That way IDEs/editors that use bold as part of their syntax highlighting leave your text still properly fixed width.

java example quick brown fox example

Like ProFont, Proggy & others, its quite small (& being bitmap based, obviously doesn't scale), but I like a small font for coding and its still extremely clear and easy on the eyes.

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I've never found a better font after MonteCarlo. You've forgot to mention the biggest reason for using it - you can see more code with it than any other font. –  Vineet Reynolds Sep 6 '09 at 14:00
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I have to agree with Kevin Kenny, Proggy fonts all the way, though I prefer Proggy Clean. But either way you have to go with a font that clearly shows the difference between the number 0 and the letter O. Which the preview font here doesn't really show that.

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I'm on PanicSans 12pt w/ AA on TextMate, but loving Inconsolata on Terminal/vim... (debating changing my TM font to this one... but point size 14pt) :)

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Consolas for me as well

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I just tried Consolas and Envy - Envy seems "too narrow" to my eyes, but Consolas looks great (I am on a mac). Thanks for the tips !

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Courier New for me as well, it's well spaced.

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Another vote for Consolas for code editing, and Dina for console output.

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Lucida Console every time.

I've never found a font that can pack as many lines of code onto the screen at the same point size without looking cramped.

And it looks nice too.

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I just recently switched from Bitstream Vera Sans Mono to Inconsolata, but reading the answers here, I'm going to give Consolas a chance for a bit. Looks really nice so far.

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I love consolas, especially with italics for comments. The little italic curlicues are so cute :P

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@modesty:

I wish there was a Mac version.

You can install the font on a Mac. I use it all the time, everywhere, without any problem. The only thing to pay attention for is to set nomacatsui when working with GVIM, or better yet, switch to MacVim.

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Another vote up for Dina. As long as you use it at its optimum size (9 pt), it looks great.

alt text

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For quite some time I've been using ProFont, mainly because it allows a lot of lines fit into a given height (a lot more than say Consolas or others). Consolas is not bad either, though...

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I never considered changing my font, I have always been happy with Courier. This thread has truely opened my eyes, if only I could upvote it!

Went with Droid Sans Mono.

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