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Just installed the new IIS Express today and saw that the Web Platform Installer also has the option to install "IIS 7 Recommended Configuration". But I couldn't actually figure out anywhere what it does?

Anyone using it?

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2 Answers 2

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The IIS 7 Recommended Configuration in WebPI v3 is the equivilent of the IIS 7 components that were installed automatically in WebPI v2 when you installed an application.

For example, in WebPI v2 and on a clean Win7 machine, if you selected to install DotNetNuke, WebPI would automatically bring along a set of IIS components so your application would function.

WebPI v3 does the same thing, but now we've added an entry to allow you to easily install our recommended set of IIS7 components without installing an application

For reference, here is the list of components

  • Static Content
  • Default Document
  • Directory Browse
  • HTTP Errors
  • HTTP Logging
  • Logging Libraries
  • Request Monitor
  • Request Filtering
  • HTTP Static Compression
  • Management Console
  • ASP NET
  • NetFX Extensibility
  • ISAPI Filter
  • ISAPI Extensions
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Thanks, this helps. But basically if you have a running website, you don't really need this. The title sounded a little like it would for example help to make your IIS more secure or something like that. –  Remy Jan 17 '11 at 9:15

This seems to be from the Chris Sfanos post here: http://forums.iis.net/t/1174703.aspx

But it doesn't really say what it improves over what IIS 7 already has.

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It does not improve anything. It doesn't even install any new bits from the net. This entry in Web PI is just to trigger recommended configuration of IIS 7. –  kateroh May 16 '11 at 17:53

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