Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a pop-up menu..every time the users log into the system, the pop-up menu will appear but for the users that don't want this pop-up to appear on their screen, i use checkbox so that the pop-up not appear every time they login. how i want to save the setting in registry for the users that checked the check box so that the pop-up menu not appear

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried so far? What problems did you encounter? –  David Heffernan Jan 14 '11 at 9:48
    
just google "Delphi Registry" and first hit is exactly what you want –  PA. Jan 14 '11 at 9:54
    
writing to the registry is a pretty bad practice(unless you want to modify OS settings but even in this case it's not really a good idea unless you know what you're doing, based on your question I guess you don't -- no offense!!), I hate applications which messes with the OS registry, please consider using configuration file(s): ini, xml, etc. –  ComputerSaysNo Jan 14 '11 at 16:08
6  
@Dorin User settings need to go somewhere in the user profile. That's either the registry or a file somewhere under the users profile. Different needs motivate different choices, but using HKCU is perfectly valid choice much of the time. –  David Heffernan Jan 14 '11 at 20:01
1  
@Dorin: On Windows Vista and later your configuration files must go to a writeable directory anyway, storing the application and its settings in the same directory is a no-go today. Using the registry is also perfectly fine, if done correctly. –  Jens Mühlenhoff Jan 17 '11 at 13:03
show 6 more comments

1 Answer

You can use TRegistry class to Read/Save values from/to registry.
See on Help; There are some samples of use.

For read some like This:

 RegNGFS:= TRegistry.Create;
   try
     RegNGFS.RootKey := HKEY_CURRENT_USER;
     if RegNGFS.OpenKey('SOFTWARE\NGFS', FALSE) then begin
       MaxSteps:= RegNGFS.ReadInteger('MaxSteps');
       StopIN:= RegNGFS.ReadInteger('StopIN');
     end;
   finally
     RegNGFS.Free;
   end;

For write, some like this:

   RegNGFS:= TRegistry.Create;
   try
     RegNGFS.RootKey := HKEY_CURRENT_USER;
     if RegNGFS.OpenKey('SOFTWARE\NGFS', TRUE) then begin
       RegNGFS.ReadInteger('MaxSteps', MaxSteps);
       RegNGFS.ReadInteger('StopIN', StopIN);
     end;
   finally
     RegNGFS.Free;
   end;

You an test some methods like WriteBool, ReadBool, ReadString, WriteString,...
Regards

share|improve this answer
9  
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE? Is it 1995 again and somebody forgot to tell me?!! Seriously, user settings go in HKEY_CURRENT_USER for many reasons, not the least of which is that users don't, in general, have write access to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE. Also, the write code ought to be writing rather than reading. –  David Heffernan Jan 14 '11 at 9:57
3  
@David Heffernan; Please, it's a very simple sample to see the class TRegistry and the save/write methods. The user must dedice the correct key to save the values. –  Neftalí Jan 14 '11 at 11:08
3  
@Neftali OK, but it's broken in plenty of ways. The reads will fail if values don't exist. What's more there are no writes in your sample code. It don't compile. Yes I know what you mean, but you might like to edit the code a little. And as for HKLM/HKCU surely for a simple example it would make sense to choose the one that requires no rights and will actually meet the OP's requirements. –  David Heffernan Jan 14 '11 at 15:12
1  
@Neftalí: I'm with David in the way your example suggest to use the HKLM registry root, but this is a bad practice unless you'r application is running with elevated privileges. To make a better example is matter of just change your example to use HKCU. Y, es un gusto verte por aquí Neftalí, de verdad es un honor contar con alguien tan brillante en las filas de SO. Estoy esperando ver el día que haya un sitio como este en español, donde también espero encontrate de cuando en cuando. ;) –  jachguate Jan 14 '11 at 21:06
2  
@Neftalí That's better now, but it still doesn't write to the registry. Look at the code again - it only contains read commands! –  David Heffernan Jan 17 '11 at 11:01
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.