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I have the following chunk of header and footer code appearing in alot of methods. Is there a cleaner way of implementing this?

 Session sess = factory.openSession();
 Transaction tx;
 try {
     tx = sess.beginTransaction();
     //do some work
     ...
     tx.commit();
 }
 catch (Exception e) {
     if (tx!=null) tx.rollback();
     throw e;
 }
 finally {
     sess.close();
 }

The class in question is actually an EJB 2.0 SessionBean which looks like:

public class PersonManagerBean implements SessionBean {
    public void addPerson(String name) {
        // boilerplate
        // dostuff
        // boilerplate
    }

    public void deletePerson(Long id) {
        // boilerplate
        // dostuff
        // boilerplate
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Note that wont actually compile. best immediate fix is to move the assignment of tx out of that try. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 14 '11 at 14:23
up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you can fit the // do some work into a strategy pattern, you could create a method containing your boilerplate code passing the action as parameter;

void executeWork(WorkInterface work) {
Session sess = factory.openSession();
 Transaction tx;
 try {
     tx = sess.beginTransaction();

     work.execute();

     tx.commit();
 }
 catch (Exception e) {
     if (tx!=null) tx.rollback();
     throw e;
 }
 finally {
     sess.close();
 }

This pattern will fit as long as you do not have to pass many parameters into the execute() method.

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding your mention of parameters.. would be it be bad practice to also pass in "object args" into the execute() method? Each implementation of execute() will know how to interpret the object, and can pass an IllegalArgumentException if args is not of proper type. – Roman Jun 2 '11 at 0:22
    
@Roman, passing in a reference to an data-holder object would be a valid approach. The execute() method would accept a base class reference and the implementations could handle subclasses of that base class for instance. – rsp Jun 2 '11 at 7:34

You could introduce an abstract class that collects all this boilerplate stuff. Advantage: avoids unnecessary duplication of code. Here's one approach:

 public abstract AbstractBase {

   public void doSomthing() {
    Session sess = factory.openSession();
    Transaction tx;
    try {
       tx = sess.beginTransaction();
       doStuff();
       tx.commit();
    }
    catch (Exception e) {
      if (tx!=null) tx.rollback();
      throw e;
    }
    finally {
     sess.close();
    }
   }

   public abstract void doStuff();
}

Your implementations simply subclass AbstractBase and implement the doStuff() method

share|improve this answer
private void withTransactedSession(Runnable runnable)
{
   Session sess = factory.openSession();
   Transaction tx;
   try {
       tx = sess.beginTransaction();
       runnable.run();
       tx.commit();
   }
   catch (Exception e) {
       if (tx!=null) tx.rollback();
       throw e;
   }
   finally {
       sess.close();
   }
}

...

withTransactedSession(new Runnable()
{
    public void run()
    {      
        //do some work
        ...
    }
});

You can use your own interface instead of Runnable if you need to throw specific exceptions.

share|improve this answer
    
Instead of using such a generic interface like Runnable I suggest using a specific one like rsp answered. – Mot Jan 14 '11 at 11:43

You probably want something like:

 final Session sess = factory.openSession();
 try {
     boolean committed = false;
     final Transaction tx = sess.beginTransaction();
     try {
         //do some work
         ...
         tx.commit();
         committed = true;
     } finally {
         if (!committed) {
             tx.rollback();
         }
     }
 } finally {
     sess.close();
 }

I've taken the liberty of rolling back no matter what exception, and avoided the issue about which checked exceptions to declare. As Vincent and Robert's answers mention, using the Execute Around idiom allows you to write the code once (although it's still highly verbose).

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