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If I have an object implementing the Map interface in Java and I wish to iterate over every pair contained within it, what is the most efficient way of going through the map?

Will the ordering of elements depend on the specific map implementation that I have for the interface?

share|improve this question
    
@Pureferret Not sure what you expect from the bounty - The most upvoted and accepted answer does use generics and shows the right way to do it... –  assylias Oct 8 '12 at 9:47
4  
@assylias yeah I've made a mistake. I didn't read these answers closely enough. I'm used to people pairing iterators with generics, so when I didn't see one I assumed the later was missing also. –  Pureferret Oct 8 '12 at 10:16
    
What you can use to view HashMap and much more on HashMap you may find in my Internal life of HashMap tutorial –  Volodymyr Levytskyi Jul 25 '13 at 10:44

22 Answers 22

up vote 1075 down vote accepted
for (Map.Entry<String, String> entry : map.entrySet())
{
    System.out.println(entry.getKey() + "/" + entry.getValue());
}
share|improve this answer
11  
I think you should remove the 'Map.' before 'Map.Entry' so the for becomes "for (Entry<String, String> entry : map.entrySet())" –  Roalt Mar 22 '10 at 10:22
18  
If you do that, then it won't work as Entry is a nested Class in Map. java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Map.html –  ScArcher2 Mar 22 '10 at 13:30
91  
you can write the import as "import java.util.Map.Entry;" and it will work. –  jjujuma Apr 30 '10 at 10:34
2  
@jjujuma cool that's good to know! –  ScArcher2 Apr 30 '10 at 13:44
8  
@Pureferret The only reason you might want to use an iterator is if you need to call its remove method. If that is the case, this other answer shows you how to do it. Otherwise, the enhanced loop as shown in the answer above is the way to go. –  assylias Oct 8 '12 at 10:34

Yes, the order depends on the specific Map implementation.

@ScArcher2 has the more elegant Java 1.5 syntax. In 1.4, I would do something like this:

Iterator entries = myMap.entrySet().iterator();
while (entries.hasNext()) {
  Entry thisEntry = (Entry) entries.next();
  Object key = thisEntry.getKey();
  Object value = thisEntry.getValue();
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer
14  
Prefer for-loop than while.. for(Iterator entries = myMap.entrySet().iterator(); entries.hasNext(); ) {...} With this syntax the 'entries' scope is reduced to the for loop only. –  HanuAthena Oct 20 '09 at 13:20
1  
@HanuAthena for-loops are great as long as you aren't modifying the map (Collection). By using while, you don't run the risk of ConcurrentModificationException's –  jpredham Jan 9 '12 at 23:17
2  
@jpredham You are right that using the for construct as for (Entry e : myMap.entrySet) will not allow you to modify the collection, but the example as @HanuAthena mentioned it should work, since it gives you the Iterator in scope. (Unless I'm missing something...) –  pkaeding Jan 10 '12 at 15:42

This is a two part question:

How to iterate over the entries of a Map - @ScArcher2 has answered that perfectly.

What is the order of iteration - if you are just using Map, then strictly speaking, there are no ordering guarantees. So you shouldn't really rely on the ordering given by any implementation. However, the SortedMap interface extends Map and provides exactly what you are looking for - implementations will aways give a consistent sort order.

NavigableMap is another useful extension - this is a SortedMap with additional methods for finding entries by their ordered position in the key set. So potentially this can remove the need for iterating in the first place - you might be able to find the specific entry you are after using the higherEntry, lowerEntry, ceilingEntry, or floorEntry methods. The descendingMap method even gives you an explicit method of reversing the traversal order.

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4  
+1 for mentioning NavigableMap, news to me –  Jason S Aug 18 '09 at 17:50

Typical code for iterating over a map is:

Map<String,Thing> map = ...;
for (Map.Entry<String,Thing> entry : map.entrySet()) {
    String key = entry.getKey();
    Thing thing = entry.getValue();
    ...
}

HashMap is the canonical map implementation and doesn't make guarantees (or though it should not change order if no mutating operation are performed on it). SorterMap will return entries on however the map sorts the keys. LinkedHashMap will either return entries in insertion-order or access-order depending upon how it has been constructed. EnumMap returns entries in natural order of keys.

Note, IdentityHashMap entrySet iterator currently has a peculiar implementation which returns the same Map.Entry instance for every item in the entrySet! However, every time a new the iterator advances the Map.Entry is updated.

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2  
EnumMap also has this peculiar behaviour along with IdentityHashMap –  Premraj Mar 10 '11 at 15:41

Example of using iterator and generics:

Iterator<Map.Entry<String, String>> entries = myMap.entrySet().iterator();
while (entries.hasNext()) {
  Map.Entry<String, String> entry = entries.next();
  String key = entry.getKey();
  String value = entry.getValue();
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
You should put Iterator in a for loop to limit its scope. –  Steve Kuo Feb 17 '12 at 20:32
    
+1 for using generics –  Pureferret Oct 5 '12 at 15:24
    
+1 for being able to removes entries that meet condition(s). –  lcn Aug 24 '13 at 2:43

FYI, you can also use map.keySet() and map.values() if you're only interested in keys/values of the map and not the other.

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The correct way to do this is to use the accepted answer as it is the most efficient. I find the following code looks a bit cleaner.

for (String key: map.keySet()) {
   System.out.println(key + "/" + map.get(key));
}
share|improve this answer
8  
This is not the best approach, it's much more efficient to use the entrySet(). Findbugs will flag this code (see findbugs.sourceforge.net/…) –  Jeff Olson Nov 6 '09 at 20:46
2  
@JeffOlson meh, not really. map lookup is O(1) so both loops behave the same way. admittedly, it will be slightly slower in a micro benchmark but i sometimes do this as well because i hate writing the type arguments over and over again. Also this will quite likely never be your performance bottleneck, so go for it if it makes the code more readable. –  kritzikratzi Oct 8 '12 at 13:25
1  
sorry, wrong :) –  kritzikratzi Oct 8 '12 at 23:23
2  
more in detail: O(1) = 2*O(1) is pretty much the definition of the big O notation. you're right in that it runs a bit slower, but in terms of complexity they're the same. –  kritzikratzi Oct 8 '12 at 23:26
1  
by collision or not i meant it doesn't matter if you a few collisions, obviously it's a different story if you have only collisions. so you're being pretty petty, but yep, what you're saying is true. –  kritzikratzi Dec 23 '12 at 16:17

In Java 8 you can do it clean and fast like this using the new lambdas features:

 Map<String,String> map = new HashMap<>();
 map.put("SomeKey", "SomeValue");
 map.forEach( (k,v) -> [do something with key and value] );

 // such as
 map.forEach( (k,v) -> System.out.println("Key: " + k + ": Value: " + v));

The type of K and V will be inferred by the compiler and there is no need to use Map.Entry any more.

Easy-peasy!

share|improve this answer
1  
You're talking about news in Java 1.8, but you still use raw types as if there were still the times of Java 1.4. Come on! –  Natix Jan 29 at 18:37
1  
@Natix LOL. This example does not need parameterized types. If it did, then it would be a bit more verbose and more technically correct. But I am trying to show how to iterate key/values and adding generics/paramaterized types just makes it look messy .. for this example at least. –  Saint Hill Jan 29 at 18:56
1  
Do you realize that you're making a bad example for anyone who will read this answer in the future? By the way, you're mentioning that type of K and V will be inferred by the compiler - but actually, by using raw types, there is no type inference at all, k and v are just Objects in this case! By adding generics, you could have nicely shown that even when the types of the lambda parameters are omitted, their actual types are still inferred. –  Natix Jan 29 at 20:21
1  
Just for you I will add in types! Thanks for the feedback. –  Saint Hill Jan 29 at 21:08
    
Depending on what you want to do with a map, you can also use stream API on the entries returned by map.entrySet().stream() docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/stream/Stream.html –  Vitalii Fedorenko Jun 28 at 12:46

Try this with Java 1.4:

for( Iterator entries = myMap.entrySet().iterator(); entries.hasNext();){

  Entry entry = (Entry) entries.next();

  System.out.println(entry.getKey() + "/" + entry.getValue());

  //...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
you may wish to format this code correctly! Be a good citizen –  Henley Chiu Sep 27 '11 at 18:39
    
thank you for formatting this. may u have good karma –  Henley Chiu Aug 8 '12 at 19:56
public class abcd{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
       Map<Integer, String> testMap = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
        testMap.put(10, "a");
        testMap.put(20, "b");
        testMap.put(30, "c");
        testMap.put(40, "d");
        for (Integer key:testMap.keySet()) {
            String value=testMap.get(key);
            System.out.println(value);
        }
    }
}

OR

public class abcd {
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
       Map<Integer, String> testMap = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
        testMap.put(10, "a");
        testMap.put(20, "b");
        testMap.put(30, "c");
        testMap.put(40, "d");
        for (Entry<Integer, String> entry : testMap.entrySet()) {
            Integer key=entry.getKey();
            String value=entry.getValue();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In GS Collections, you would use the forEachKeyValue method on the MapIterable interface, which is inherited by the MutableMap and ImmutableMap interfaces and their implementations.

final MutableBag<String> result = Bags.mutable.of();
MutableMap<Integer, String> map = Maps.mutable.of(1, "One", 2, "Two", 3, "Three");
map.forEachKeyValue(new Procedure2<Integer, String>()
{
    public void value(Integer key, String value)
    {
        result.add(key + value);
    }
});
Assert.assertEquals(Bags.mutable.of("1One", "2Two", "3Three"), result);

When Lambdas arrive in Java 8, you will be able to write the code as follows:

MutableBag<String> result = Bags.mutable.of();
MutableMap<Integer, String> map = Maps.mutable.of(1, "One", 2, "Two", 3, "Three");
map.forEachKeyValue((key, value) -> { result.add(key + value);});
Assert.assertEquals(Bags.mutable.of("1One", "2Two", "3Three"), result);

Note: I am a developer on GS Collections.

share|improve this answer

In Map one can Iteration over keys and/or values and/or both (e.g., entrySet) depends on one's interested in_ Like:

1.) Iterate through the keys -> keySet() of the map:

Map<String, Object> map = ...;

for (String key : map.keySet()) {
    //your Business logic...
}

2.) Iterate through the values -> values() of the map:

for (Object value : map.values()) {
    //your Business logic...
}

3.) Iterate through the both -> entrySet() of the map:

for (Map.Entry<String, Object> entry : map.entrySet()) {
    String key = entry.getKey();
    Object value = entry.getValue();
    //your Business logic...
}

Moreover, there are 3 difference ways to Iterate Through a HashMap. They are as below_

//1.
for (Map.Entry entry : hm.entrySet()) {
    System.out.print("key,val: ");
    System.out.println(entry.getKey() + "," + entry.getValue());
}

//2.
Iterator iter = hm.keySet().iterator();
while(iter.hasNext()) {
    Integer key = (Integer)iter.next();
    String val = (String)hm.get(key);
    System.out.println("key,val: " + key + "," + val);
}

//3.
Iterator it = hm.entrySet().iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) it.next();
    Integer key = (Integer)entry.getKey();
    String val = (String)entry.getValue();
    System.out.println("key,val: " + key + "," + val);
}
share|improve this answer

In theory, the most efficient way will depend on which implementation of Map. The official way to do this is to call map.entrySet(), which returns a set of Map.Entry, each of which contains a key and a value (entry.getKey() and entry.getValue()).

In an idiosyncratic implementation, it might make some difference whether you use map.keySet(), map.entrySet() or something else. But I can't think of a reason why anyone would write it like that. Most likely it makes no difference to performance what you do.

And yes, the order will depend on the implementation - as well as (possibly) the order of insertion and other hard-to-control factors.

[edit] I wrote valueSet() originally but of course entrySet() is actually the answer.

share|improve this answer

If you have a generic untyped Map you can use:

    Map map = new HashMap();
    for (Map.Entry entry : ((Set<Map.Entry>) map.entrySet())) {
        System.out.println(entry.getKey() + "/" + entry.getValue());
    }
share|improve this answer

There are several ways to iterate over map.

Here is comparision of their performances for a common data set stored in map by storing 10 lacs key value pairs in map and will iterate over map.

1) Using enrtySet() in for each loop

for (Map.Entry<String,Integer> entry : testMap.entrySet()) {
    entry.getKey();
    entry.getValue();
}

50 milliseconds

2) Using keySet() in for each loop

for (String key : testMap.keySet()) {
    testMap.get(key);
}

76 milliseconds

3) Using enrtySet() and iterator

Iterator<Map.Entry<String,Integer>> itr1 = testMap.entrySet().iterator();
while(itr1.hasNext())
{
    Map.Entry<String,Integer> entry = itr1.next();
    entry.getKey();
    entry.getValue();
}

50 milliseconds

4) Using keySet() and iterator

Iterator itr2 = testMap.keySet().iterator();
while(itr2.hasNext())
{
    String key = itr2.next();
    testMap.get(key);
}

75 milliseconds

I have refered this link.

share|improve this answer

you can do it using generics:

Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
Iterator<Map.Entry<Integer, Integer>> entries = map.entrySet().iterator();
while (entries.hasNext()) {
Map.Entry<Integer, Integer> entry = entries.next();
System.out.println("Key = " + entry.getKey() + ", Value = " + entry.getValue());}
share|improve this answer

Yes, as many people agreed this is the best way to iterate over MAP.

But there are chances to throw nullpointerexception if map is null.Don't forget to put null .check

                                                  | 
                                                  |  
                                          - - - - 
                                        |
                                        |          
 for (Map.Entry<String, Object> entry : map.entrySet()) {
    String key = entry.getKey();
    Object value = entry.getValue();

}
share|improve this answer

Iterator iterator = map.entrySet().iterator();

    while (iterator.hasNext()) {

        Map.Entry element = (Map.Entry)it.next();

        LOGGER.debug("Key: " + element.getKey());

        LOGGER.debug("value: " + element.getValue());


    }
share|improve this answer

JAVA 8
You can use Lambda Expressions.

myMap.entrySet().stream().forEach((entry) -> {
    Object currentKey = entry.getKey();
    Object currentValue = entry.getValue();
});

For more information follow this.

share|improve this answer
    
omg, this is ugly! :) –  injecteer Aug 4 at 10:34
    
@injecteer: Seems the motive of lambda expressions –  root Aug 21 at 19:49

There are the several way to iterate a map please refer the following code When you iterate a map using iterator Interface you must to go with Entry or entrySet() look like this

import java.util.*;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.Map;
public class IteratMapDemo{
public static void main(String arg[]){
Map<String,String> mapOne =new HashMap<String,String>();
   mapOne.put("1","January");
   mapOne.put("2","February");
   mapOne.put("3","March");
   mapOne.put("4","April");
   mapOne.put("5","May");
   mapOne.put("6","June");
   mapOne.put("7","July");
   mapOne.put("8","August");
   mapOne.put("9","September");
   mapOne.put("10","Octomber");
   mapOne.put("11","November");
   mapOne.put("12","December"); 

    Iterator it = mapOne.entrySet().iterator();
    while(it.hasNext())
    {
        Map.Entry me=(Map.Entry) it.next();
        //System.out.println("Get Key through While loop = " +me.getKey());
    }
    for(Map.Entry<String,String> entry:mapOne.entrySet()){
        //System.out.println(entry.getKey() + "=" +entry.getValue() );
    }

    for (Object key : mapOne.keySet()) {
    System.out.println("Key : " + key.toString() + " Value : "
        + mapOne.get(key));
}

}
}
share|improve this answer
Iterator itr2 = testMap.keySet().iterator();
            while(itr2.hasNext())
            {
                String key = itr2.next();
                testMap.get(key);
            }



for (String key: map.keySet()) {    System.out.println(key + "/" +
        map.get(key)); }

The best way is entrySet() though

share|improve this answer

I copied the data of a map to another with this code:

HashMap product =(HashMap)shopping_truck.get(i);
HashMap tmp = new HashMap();
for (Iterator it = product.entrySet().iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
    Map.Entry thisEntry = (Map.Entry) it.next();
    tmp.put(thisEntry.getKey(), thisEntry.getValue());
}
share|improve this answer

protected by Flexo Apr 10 '13 at 6:54

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