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I am wondering if my situation is the norm or not. I find that many of the developers I work with are only programmers from nine to five. Learning anything new requires a mandate from the company. Is this type of developer the norm out there?

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9 Answers 9

I would guess most programmers fall into the 9 to 5 category.

What other professions do you race home to continue your work? Programming takes passion and commitment. Not everyone can devote this level of energy to the discipline.

It also takes time, which is in short supply. Most of those 9 to 5'ers had the fire burning within them at one point... things change. They get married, have kids... priorities change. It's life.

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In college and a few years out of college (only 3 years removed now), I was definitely the full-on geek. I'd spend pretty much all of my time coding, reading books, and learning new things. I couldn't get enough.

The passion for me hasn't changed at all. I still spend some of my free time coding, working on personal projects, reading books, etc. However, I do far less of it now and I do leave work at 5. Why? Because my son goes to sleep at 6:30. :) Now, I'm married, have a 14 month old son, and another baby on the way. Life happened. My passion is still there, but my priorities have changed and I wouldn't have it any other way.

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I'll trade you. Mine fights sleep until 10. –  aehiilrs Nov 2 '09 at 16:27
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I had tons of passion for programming, but then I married it. I cheat on it with my camera or my bicycle in the evenings.

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+1 for cheating lol –  Perpetualcoder Oct 30 '09 at 22:38
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Frankly I think every developer internally has a both grouchy man who just wants to go get things done and doesn't like dealing with new things but also an excited kid who wants to take everything apart and put it back together again. Some have more of one than the other and there's an eternal struggle within us all who will win :)

I've spent time not really accomplishing anything, just to learn something. I've also spent time in a pure pursuit to "hack it out" and "get it done" when stopping to invest in some learning would be valuable. Both are extremes and can lead to problems, naturally.

Really software development calls for a careful balance of the two, knowing when to buck up and just do the work and knowing when an investment in your knowledge is warranted.

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I agree, and i think i find myself doing the same thing! –  ccook Jan 22 '09 at 13:38
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Its a mix and I think it always will be. It sounds like you got a bad ratio, but that might have to do with who does the hiring and the personalities they look for.

We have people who work 8-5 then go home and either continue working on company projects or their own side projects or just learn new technology. It seems like their life is based on it. Then, like you said, we have people who like to come in and do their work and thats it. I guess the majority here really love what they do and stay on top of the latest and greatest, but only a few take it to the extremes.

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From my experience this happens a lot in businesses where the development department began as a part of IT. Often springing up from an evolution from Spreadsheet -> Access Database -> full application. The people who write them are mainly concerned with getting things done rather than writing good code. In fact to many people there is no such thing as intrinsically good code. Just software that gets the job done. This is not a bad thing in these situations. But these are not the people who love programming and they are not the people who write the frameworks and tools that their software is built upon.

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I don't think you can generalize like this.

I've worked with all kinds of developers - some who just want to scoot away at the stroke of 5 or some others who don't have a social life and happily spend their entire nights coding or hacking away.

Personally, its the individual incentives (both monetary and otherwise) that the developer has that determines whether he's the 9-5 types or the hardworking types.

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Someone who works 9-5 != not hard working. -1 unless you can refute? –  Adam Naylor Jan 22 '09 at 13:38
    
Err..By 9-5, I meant the type described by the poser of this question if that makes it clear. –  Nikhil Kashyap Jan 22 '09 at 13:40
    
ok have it back :) –  Adam Naylor Jan 22 '09 at 13:43
    
More appropriate might be 10-4 :) –  ccook Jan 22 '09 at 18:11
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They can only mandate what you learn at work - no-one is stopping you from learning outside work.

So, back to your question - I work with both kinds of people, the 9-6's and the full-on geeks. They both bring things to the table, sometimes you need the non-geeks to keep the geeks in check!

I would say that there are a lot of 9-5ers out there but they may be geeks about other things! Its good to have a mix, on the whole I prefer to work with the inquisitive geeky type though.

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In academics I typically find a lot of people who want to learn how to program just because of the salaries available. Its quite frustrating and not all of the ones who go into this for the money are weeded out early on.

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