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I have created a simple List function but if I Loop through the List it's empty. It should not be!

// List function 
    public class process_hook
    {
        public static List<String> pro_hook = new List<String>
                                              (new String[] { list_all_pocesses() });
        protected static string list_all_pocesses()
        {
            StringBuilder _list = new StringBuilder();
            foreach (Process i in Process.GetProcesses("."))
            {
                try
                {
                    foreach (ProcessModule pm in i.Modules)
                    {
                        pro_hook.Add(pm.FileName.ToString());
                    }
                }
                catch { }
            }
            return _list.ToString();
        }
    }


        // call 
        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            foreach (String _list in process_hook.pro_hook)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(_list);
            }
        }
share|improve this question
2  
Please revert your code back to its broken state as if you correct it in your question then all the answers to your original question are invalid. @Jon Skeet's answer is by far the most detailed and explained why your original code was not working rather than just giving you a completed solution without explanation. –  Piers Myers Jan 14 '11 at 13:57
1  
@Piers Myers: Rolled back, great minds and all that. –  Lazarus Jan 14 '11 at 14:02

4 Answers 4

up vote -3 down vote accepted

_list.ToString() is not going to return any meaningful value. Try something like this instead:

public static List<string> pro_hook = list_all_processes();

protected static List<string> list_all_processes()
{
    var list = new List<string>();

    foreach (Process i in Process.GetProcesses(".")) {
        try {
            foreach (ProcessModule pm in i.Modules) {
                list.Add(pm.FileName);
            }
        } catch { }
    }

    return list;
}
share|improve this answer
13  
Do you really think the catch {} is a good idea? –  Jon Skeet Jan 14 '11 at 13:52
2  
Sorry, but I just had to down vote you for leaving the "catch { }" in there. –  Bernhard Hofmann Jan 14 '11 at 13:57
7  
Why just give corrected code without explanation? What will anyone learn from this? The empty catch block is a really bad thing to do - either remove it all together or ensure you do something with any exceptions caught. –  Piers Myers Jan 14 '11 at 14:02
10  
@Power-Mosfet: Because it swallows all exceptions silently: you can't tell when anything's gone wrong. a) it's almost always a bad idea to handle all exceptions uniformly; b) it's almost always a bad idea to swallow exceptions, taking no action (not event logging). Doing both at once is a terrible idea. –  Jon Skeet Jan 14 '11 at 14:09
2  
@Alex: Perhaps. The question is kind of bizarre in and of itself. As this code worked for the OP, I'm hesitant to delete it outright. But the question could probably be closed and deleted as "too localized" -- this particular problem is unlikely to be encountered by anyone else as it is a unique symphony of diverse and egregious errors. –  cdhowie Jan 14 '11 at 16:42

Well this is a problem to start with:

catch { }

If anything goes wrong, you'll just silently abort.

Maybe that's what's happening? (EDIT: It is. See later.)

The next problem is that your "list" will only ever contain a single string... is that really what you intended? I doubt that the list you're seeing is actually empty - but it will contain a single empty string.

(As a side note, I would strongly suggest that you start following .NET naming conventions and avoid global variables like this.)

EDIT: Aargh - I've just realized what you've done. You're probably actually getting a NullReferenceException in list_all_pocesses, which you've caught and ignored.

Your call to pro_hook.Add is made before you've assigned a value to pro_hook. Basically you've got a variable initializer which uses a method which in turn uses the variable. Don't do that. If you step through your code in the debugger, you may get more of an idea of what's going on, but basically you've created a big ball of spaghetti for yourself.

Why doesn't list_all_pocesses just return a List<string>? Why are you using a StringBuilder at all?

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$exception {"Access is denied"} System.Exception {System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception} –  honibis Jan 14 '11 at 13:38
    
@honibis: Even without that, he'll get a NullReferenceException. –  Jon Skeet Jan 14 '11 at 13:39
    
It will definitely throw a NullReferenceException, which ends up being swallowed. The way the pro_hook variable is initialized is wrong. @bniwredyc fixed it in his solution. –  Thorarin Jan 14 '11 at 13:48
    
@Thorarin: It will only throw a NullReferenceException if nothing else throws an exception first :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 14 '11 at 14:02
    
Well, the foreach is not likely to cause a problem. Process.GetProcesses is not inside a try-catch ;) –  Thorarin Jan 15 '11 at 15:28

Well... you're returning an empty string builder. That's your problem. Your code is doing what you're telling it to do. :)

 return _list.ToString();
share|improve this answer
public class process_hook
{
    public static List<string> pro_hook = list_all_pocesses();
    protected static List<string> list_all_pocesses()
    {
        List<string> list = new List<string>();

        foreach (Process i in Process.GetProcesses("."))
        {
            foreach (ProcessModule pm in i.Modules)
            {
                list.Add(pm.FileName.ToString());
            }
        }
        return list;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
pro_hook is List<string> but list_all_processes has return type of string --> this won't compile. –  Richard Jan 14 '11 at 13:47
    
@Richard, thanks, missed that. –  bniwredyc Jan 14 '11 at 13:50
1  
Hope you don't mind, but I removed the underscore prefix for the local list variable. The .NET style guidelines weren't being followed anyway, but the underscore suggests a member variable. –  Thorarin Jan 14 '11 at 13:53
    
@Thorarin, np, I've just followed op's initial style. –  bniwredyc Jan 14 '11 at 14:02
    
edit: try/catch removed because now the only possible source of exceptions is the GetProcesses() method call and it was ouside try/catch block originally. –  bniwredyc Jan 14 '11 at 14:14

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