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I need to remove multiple items from a Dictionary. A simple way to do that is as follows :

  List<string> keystoremove= new List<string>();
  foreach (KeyValuePair<string,object> k in MyCollection)
     if (k.Value.Member==foo)
        keystoremove.Add(k.Key);
  foreach (string s in keystoremove)
        MyCollection.Remove(s);

The reason why I can't directly Remove the items in the foreach block is that this would throw an Exception ("Collection was modified...")

I'd like to do the following :

 MyCollection.RemoveAll(x =>x.Member==foo)

But the Dictionary<> class doesn't expose a RemoveAll(Predicate<> Match) method, like the List<> Class does.

What's the best way (both performance wise and elegant wise) to do that?

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7 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Here's an alternate way

foreach ( var s in MyCollection.Where(p => p.Value.Member == foo).ToList() ) {
  MyCollection.Remove(s);
}

Pushing the code into a list directly allows you to avoid the "removing while enumerating" problem. The .ToList() will force the enumeration before the foreach really starts.

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Good answer, but I don't think the ToList() is required. Is it? –  Jim Mischel Jan 22 '09 at 14:09
    
Good answer, but If I'm not mistaking, s is an instance of the Value type, so the ending s.key won't compile, or will it? –  Brann Jan 22 '09 at 14:13
    
I don't think I like this solution too much because of the ".ToList()". Its there for a purpose, but its not self-evident what its purpose is until you remove .ToList() and observe the error yourself. I wouldn't recommend this code when there are more readable alternatives available. –  Juliet Jan 22 '09 at 14:27
    
@JaredPar, please fix your answer, it is funny to see that most voted answer won't even compile. Also it is not necessary to query over values, you can get keys directly –  aku Jan 22 '09 at 14:59
2  
@Jim, the .ToList is absolutely necessary here. The foreach body modifies the underlying collection. Without the .ToList() the Where clause will be operating against a modified collection. Using .ToList() forces the query to complete before any remove occurs –  JaredPar Jan 22 '09 at 15:32
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you can create extension method:

public static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    public static void RemoveAll<TKey, TValue>(this Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dic, 
        Func<TValue, bool> predicate)
    {
        var keys = dic.Keys.Where(k => predicate(dic[k])).ToList();
        foreach (var key in keys)
        {
            dic.Remove(key);
        }
    }
}

...

dictionary.RemoveAll(x => x.Member == foo);
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Instead of removing, just do the inverse. Create a new dictionary from the old one containing only the elements you are interested in.

public Dictionary<T, U> NewDictionaryFiltered<T, U>
(
  Dictionary<T, U> source,
  Func<T, U, bool> filter
)
{
return source
  .Where(x => filter(x.Key, x.Value))
  .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.Value);
}
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From where filter came from? Can you explain what is it? –  Lyubomir Velchev Feb 10 at 10:01
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Modified version of Aku's extension method solution. Main difference is that it allows the predicate to use the dictionary key. A minor difference is that it extends IDictionary rather than Dictionary.

public static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    public static void RemoveAll<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dic,
        Func<TKey, TValue, bool> predicate)
    {
        var keys = dic.Keys.Where(k => predicate(k, dic[k])).ToList();
        foreach (var key in keys)
        {
            dic.Remove(key);
        }
    }
}

. . .

dictionary.RemoveAll((k,v) => v.Member == foo);
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I rolled back a change by Community because it did not include ToList() causing the "removing while enumerating" problem. –  Wimmel Jun 20 at 12:44
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Jerome's improvement on Aku's method is good. However, it needed an critical tweak. I have submitted the edited code. Hopefully it will get posted soon, but here it is for reference:

.......

var keyValuePairs = dic.Where(predicate).ToList();
            foreach (var kvp in keyValuePairs)

.......

The rest of the code is ok.

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Can you just change your loop to use an index (i.e. FOR instead of FOREACH)? You'd have to loop backwards, of course, i.e. count-1 down to zero.

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You can't iterate through a Dictionary with FOR. –  Brann Jan 22 '09 at 14:14
1  
Sorry, I thought the extension .ElementAt(index) would allow this, at least in .net 3.5. –  Geoff Jan 22 '09 at 15:44
    
@brann oh, you can using linq. for (int index = 0; index < MyCollection.Count; index++) { var kvp = MyCollection.ElementAt(index); var kvp = item.Key; var kvp = item.Value; } –  Offler Jun 12 '13 at 9:06
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Instead of removing just do the inverse (create a new dictionary from the old one containing only the elements you are interested in) and let the garbage collector take care of the old dictionary:

var newDictionary = oldDictionary.Select(x => x.Value != foo);
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This would potentially lead to terrible performance, wouldn't it? –  Brann Jan 22 '09 at 14:19
1  
With the var keyword in there, would this not give newDictionary a type of IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, rather than Dictionary<TKey, TValue> ? –  Chris Ammerman Jan 22 '09 at 14:43
2  
Enumerable.Select does not do filtering. –  David B Jan 22 '09 at 15:09
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