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How can I find out what parameters were passed to an (asynchronous) jQuery AJAX request after it is complete?

Basically, I am firing a bunch of AJAX requests with different id passed as a parameter and displaying the results to the user when each of them finishes. Now, if the request is successful, I can pass the id back in the result of the request. But, if the request fails, I don't know which request failed, i.e. for what id was that request.

Example (javascript/jQuery):

for(var i=0; i < 10; i++ ) {

    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "get-results.php", 
        data: { 'id': i },
        success: function(data, textStatus, xmlReq) {

            data = $.parseJSON(data);
            $("#result" + data.id).html(data.result);

        },
        error: function(xmlReq, textStatus, errorThrown) {

            var id= ???;
            $("#result" + id).html('error bla bla');

        }
   });
}
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to capture the current value of i for the error function. And you capture with a closure. So:

error: function(id) {
    return function(xmlReq, textStatus, errorThrown) {

        $("#result" + id).html('error bla bla');

    };
}(i)

That is error is the result of immediately calling an anonymous function passing in the current value of i.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly! So it is actually needed to 'instantiate' the function with the current value to create a closure. Thanks! Too bad I can't mark both yours and Rocket's answers as accepted. –  kolufild Jan 14 '11 at 15:44
    
Rocket's was more specific to jQuery (and therefore better for your question), mine was more generic (and may help elsewhere in the future). –  boyetboy Jan 14 '11 at 16:14
    
Actually now, upon further testing, I think this is a better solution, since this way of passing vars can be used even if the request succeeds, but returns malformed data (from which the id cannot be extracted). –  kolufild Jan 14 '11 at 17:27
    
+1 for closures. I didn't even think of that :-P –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 14 '11 at 17:40
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$.ajaxError gives you the data send via the AJAX call.

.ajaxError(handler(event, XMLHttpRequest, ajaxOptions, thrownError))

The ajaxOptions object contains all the options that can be set via $.ajax

So, instead of using the error: option in $.ajax, use $.ajaxError.

$(document).ajaxError(function(event, XMLHttpRequest, ajaxOptions, thrownError){
  if(ajaxOptions.url.indexOf('get-results.php') != -1){
    var data = ajaxOptions.data; // this is a string: 'id=1&param2=4'
                                 // to get the ID, you need to parse this
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
That's it, thanks! Although, for some reason, ajaxOptions.data is actually a string in my case ('id=0', 'id=1' etc.), but that's not an issue. Wonder why I can't access the ajaxOptions object from the 'error' handler in the $.ajax() call. –  kolufild Jan 14 '11 at 15:19
    
@Dejan, I looked at the jQuery API, and ajaxOptions.data should always be a string, let me fix that in my answer. –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 14 '11 at 15:26
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Use the fact that Javascript supports closures, and just write the variable name (but be careful to copy it inside the for block scope so that it does not change):

for(var i=0; i < 10; i++ ) {
    var INDEX = i;
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "get-results.php", 
        data: { 'id': i },
        success: function(data, textStatus, xmlReq) {

            data = $.parseJSON(data);
            $("#result" + data.id).html(data.result);

        },
        error: function(xmlReq, textStatus, errorThrown) {

            var id = INDEX;
            $("#result" + id).html('error bla bla');

        }
   });
}

I believe that this is what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't work. In your example, INDEX gets overwritten in each iteration of the loop. So, in each call of the error handler, the value of INDEX will be 9 (the value which was assigned to it in the last iteration). –  kolufild Jan 14 '11 at 14:50
    
@Dejan: Works for me. The closure means it should work. Although the name INDEX is reused for the loop's scope in the next iteration, the actual object that had that name in the previous iteration still exists, used in the closure for the function. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 14:54
    
@Dejan: For a really simple example, run the following which is essentially the same thing with the jQuery abstracted out. You'll see that it alerts 0-9 in succession. (Sorry about having to bunch it on one line!) var funcs = []; for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) { var INDEX = i; funcs[funcs.length-1] = function() { alert(INDEX); }(); } for each (var i in funcs) { funcs[i](); } –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 14:56
    
Try this: for(var i=0; i < 10; i++ ) { var INDEX = i; $.ajax({ type: "GET", url: "any-url-that-doesnt-exist.php", data: { 'id': i }, success: function(data, textStatus, xmlReq) { }, error: function(xmlReq, textStatus, errorThrown) { var id = INDEX; alert(id); } }); } Pops '9' each time. Maybe I forgot to mention that the requests are asynchronous? –  kolufild Jan 14 '11 at 15:01
    
@Dejan: I copied your code verbatim, and for me works perfectly. Firefox 3.6.13 and IE 8.0.7600, jQuery 1.2.6 and 1.4.2. Don't know what else to tell you. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 15:06
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You'll need to pass them back with your response.

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My question was how I can get them if the request fails, i.e. there is no response. –  kolufild Jan 14 '11 at 14:36
    
I guess you'll need to set up some sort of request queue/stack/array and manage the status of each entry as the responses come back. –  Diodeus Jan 14 '11 at 14:37
    
So there is no way to extract them from the XMLHttpRequest object (which I get passed to the error hadler)? –  kolufild Jan 14 '11 at 14:38
    
@Dejan: Store them in some appropriate place in your code. We cannot know where that is. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '11 at 14:42
    
I already have the ids in an array (or they are 0-9 like in the example, it doesn't matter). But, again, the question is how can I know WHICH request failed? –  kolufild Jan 14 '11 at 14:44
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