Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need the Python / Numpy equivalent of Matlab (Octave) discrete Laplacian operator (function) del2(). I tried couple Python solutions, none of which seem to match the output of del2. On Octave I have

image = [3 4 6 7; 8 9 10 11; 12 13 14 15;16 17 18 19]
del2(image)

this gives the result

   0.25000  -0.25000  -0.25000  -0.75000
  -0.25000  -0.25000   0.00000   0.00000
   0.00000   0.00000   0.00000   0.00000
   0.25000   0.25000   0.00000   0.00000

On Python I tried

import numpy as np
from scipy import ndimage
import scipy.ndimage.filters

image =  np.array([[3, 4, 6, 7],[8, 9, 10, 11],[12, 13, 14, 15],[16, 17, 18, 19]])
stencil = np.array([[0, 1, 0],[1, -4, 1], [0, 1, 0]])
print ndimage.convolve(image, stencil, mode='wrap')

which gives the result

[[ 23  19  15  11]
 [  3  -1   0  -4]
 [  4   0   0  -4]
 [-13 -17 -16 -20]]

I also tried

scipy.ndimage.filters.laplace(image)

That gives the result

[[ 6  6  3  3]
 [ 0 -1  0 -1]
 [ 1  0  0 -1]
 [-3 -4 -4 -5]]

So none of the outputs seem to match eachother. Octave code del2.m suggests that it is a Laplacian operator. Am I missing something?

share|improve this question
    
In the interior, the operators are all the same (Matlab apparently divides by 4 where Python does not). On the boundary, you can make the two Python versions the same by also providing mode="wrap" to laplace(). But by just looking at the Matlab result, I have no idea what Matlab does on the boundaries. –  Sven Marnach Jan 15 '11 at 0:32
1  
Actually it does cubic extrapolation on the edges: mathworks.it/it/help/matlab/ref/del2.html So if you try the final example with laplace() there's no way to get the right result on the boundaries too. –  Juanlu001 Apr 8 '13 at 17:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Maybe you are looking for scipy.ndimage.filters.laplace().

share|improve this answer
    
I tested this function and compared to del2 output, it's different. –  user423805 Jan 14 '11 at 16:05
    
Of cause there can be differences in the discretisation, for example on the boundaries. Could you be more specific how you tested it and how it is different? –  Sven Marnach Jan 14 '11 at 17:03
    
I tested a = [3 4 6;7 8 9;1 3 3]; disp(del2(a)). On the Python side I called the function you mentioned, the results are completely different, on each cell. –  user423805 Jan 14 '11 at 18:04
    
Ah, I tested a bigger matrix, and yes, the differences are on the boundaries. How can I have the boundaries come out the same as del2? –  user423805 Jan 14 '11 at 22:42
    
@user423805: First find out what del2 does on the boundary (I don't know), then look up in the linked documentation how to get the same behaviour in Python. (But if you don't even know what del2 does, why is it important to you to get the same in Python?) –  Sven Marnach Jan 14 '11 at 23:20

You can use convolve to calculate the laplacian by convolving the array with the appropriate stencil:

from scipy.ndimage import convolve
stencil= (1.0/(12.0*dL*dL))*np.array(
        [[0,0,-1,0,0], 
         [0,0,16,0,0], 
         [-1,16,-60,16,-1], 
         [0,0,16,0,0], 
         [0,0,-1,0,0]])
convolve(e2, stencil, mode='wrap')
share|improve this answer

Based on the code here

http://cns.bu.edu/~tanc/pub/matlab_octave_compliance/datafun/del2.m

I attempted to write a Python equivalent. It seems to work, any feedback will be appreciated.

import numpy as np

def del2(M):
    dx = 1
    dy = 1
    rows, cols = M.shape
    dx = dx * np.ones ((1, cols - 1))
    dy = dy * np.ones ((rows-1, 1))

    mr, mc = M.shape
    D = np.zeros ((mr, mc))

    if (mr >= 3):
        ## x direction
        ## left and right boundary
        D[:, 0] = (M[:, 0] - 2 * M[:, 1] + M[:, 2]) / (dx[:,0] * dx[:,1])
        D[:, mc-1] = (M[:, mc - 3] - 2 * M[:, mc - 2] + M[:, mc-1]) \
            / (dx[:,mc - 3] * dx[:,mc - 2])

        ## interior points
        tmp1 = D[:, 1:mc - 1] 
        tmp2 = (M[:, 2:mc] - 2 * M[:, 1:mc - 1] + M[:, 0:mc - 2])
        tmp3 = np.kron (dx[:,0:mc -2] * dx[:,1:mc - 1], np.ones ((mr, 1)))
        D[:, 1:mc - 1] = tmp1 + tmp2 / tmp3

    if (mr >= 3):
        ## y direction
        ## top and bottom boundary
        D[0, :] = D[0,:]  + \
            (M[0, :] - 2 * M[1, :] + M[2, :] ) / (dy[0,:] * dy[1,:])

        D[mr-1, :] = D[mr-1, :] \
            + (M[mr-3,:] - 2 * M[mr-2, :] + M[mr-1, :]) \
            / (dy[mr-3,:] * dx[:,mr-2])

        ## interior points
        tmp1 = D[1:mr-1, :] 
        tmp2 = (M[2:mr, :] - 2 * M[1:mr - 1, :] + M[0:mr-2, :])
        tmp3 = np.kron (dy[0:mr-2,:] * dy[1:mr-1,:], np.ones ((1, mc)))
        D[1:mr-1, :] = tmp1 + tmp2 / tmp3

    return D / 4
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.