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My System: Physical memory: 3gb
Windows XP Service Pack 3 (32bit) Swap file size: 30gb

Goal: To find the largest possible memory map size I can allocate on my machine.

When I run the following code to allocate 2gb memory map file, the call fails.

handle=CreateFileMapping(INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE,NULL,PAGE_READWRITE|SEC_COMMIT,0,INT_MAX,NULL);

I've been very puzzled by this, because I can allocate a memory map file's up to the system swap file size of 30gb by constantly calling CreateFileMapping with 100mb at a time.

After restarting the machine, and re-running the application that requests 2gb of memory mapped file to CreateFileMapping it works and it returns a valid handle. So this leads me a bit confused what the hell is going on under the hood with windows?

So the situation is this, I can create many small memory mapped files using up all the system page file (30gb), but when asking for a single allocation of 2gb the call fails. When restarting the machine and running the same application the call succeeds!

Some notes:
1) The memory mapped file is not being loaded into the proccess virtual address space, there is no view yet to the file.
2) The OS can allocate small 100mb memory mapped files to 30gb of the systems page file!

Right now the only conclusion I can come to, is that the Windows XP SP3 (32bit) virtual memory manager cannot successfully reserve the requested 2gb in the system page file, and then fails due to the system memory fragmentation (it seems like it needs to reserve a continues allocation of memory, even though the page file is 4kb each). After a restart I assume the system memory fragmentation is less, thus allowing the same call to succeed and allocate a memory mapped file of 2gb in size.

I've run some experiments, after running the machine for a day I started a small application that would allocate a memory maped file of 300mb and then release it. It would then increase the size by 1mb and try again. Finally it stops at 700mb and reports (insufficient system resources). I would then go through and close down each application and this would in turn stop the error messages and it finally continues to allocate a memory mapped file of 3.5gb in size!

So my question is what is going on here? There must be some type of memory fragmentation happening internally with the virtual memory manager, because allocating 100mbs memory mapped files will consume up to the 30gb of the system page file (commit limit).

Update
Conclusion is if you're going to create a large memory mapped file backed by the system page file with INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE, then the system page file (swap file) needs to be resize to the required size and be in a non fragmented state for large allocations > 2gb! Though under heavy IO load it can still fail. To get around all these problems you can create your own file with the needed size (I did 1tb) and memory map to that file instead.

Final Update
I ran the same tests on a Windows 7 box, and to my surprise it works every single time (up to the system page file size) without touching anything. So I guess this is just a bug, that large memory allocations can fail more often on Windows XP than Windows 7.

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The only conclusion I can come to, is the table to hold 2gb of 4kb page files is too big for the system memory to handle so it fails. –  Chad Jan 14 '11 at 15:22
    
This is a mystery. No matter how big your virtual and physical memory is, no matter how many processes you are running, you can't create mem mapped file bigger than ~300MB on 32-bit Windows. –  Gene Bushuyev Jan 14 '11 at 15:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is file fragmentation. Physical memory (RAM) has nothing to do with anything here. In a virtual memory system, 'memory' is allocated from the file system. Physical memory is just an optimization to speed access to memory.

When you request a memory-mapped file with write access, the system must have a file with contiguous pages free. The system swap file is often fragmented. If your disk drive is nicely defragmented, you should be able to create a large memory-mapped file using a file of your choice (not the system page file).

So if you really have to have a 2GB memory-mapped file, you need to create one on the drive at installation. This shifts the problem of creating a contiguous 2GB file to installation, but once created, you should be ok.

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Defragging the system page file tell you how it goes –  Chad Jan 15 '11 at 14:48
    
Successfully created the mapping of:22,743mb –  Chad Jan 15 '11 at 15:11
    
Question Tergiver. Under heavy IO load or normal usage of the operating system my allocations can go from 20gb down to only 6gb and sometimes down all the way to 300mb. My assumption is windows virtual memory manager has put the pages in the system page file breaking up the ability for it to find a continues pages free. Though waiting 30 minutes after running the heavy IO program, I can again reallocate 20gb. Any ideas whats happening? I guess windows takes time to unload those pages. –  Chad Jan 16 '11 at 11:05
    
Remember that the system page file represents all of virtual memory. When you call malloc and grow a heap, you are allocating pages in the system file. Even if physical memory is available for the allocation, a backing page in the page file must be allocated for it. The OS is constantly running programs which are constantly allocating and freeing memory. Eventually things may "calm down" and there will be less memory (backed by pages) allocated... –  Tergiver Jan 16 '11 at 13:35
    
... Does the VMM defragment the page file like a garbage collector defragments a heap? Or are you encountering a coincidence where all the recent activity happened to be in contiguous pages? I don't know. –  Tergiver Jan 16 '11 at 13:35

So my question is what is going on here? There must be some type of memory fragementation happening internally with the virtual memory manager, because allocating 100mbs memory mapped files will consume up to the 30gb of the system page file (commit limit).

Sounds about right. If you don't need large contiguous chunks of memory, don't ask for them if you can get the same amount of memory in smaller chunks.

To find the largest possible memory map size I can allocate on my machine.

  • Try it with size X.
  • If that fails, try with size X/2 and repeat.

This gets you a chunk at runtime, maybe not the exact largest possible chunk, but within a factor of 2.

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My first idea was virtual address space fragmentation. however this should not play a role here, as there are no virtual addresses involved yet - those are assigned only once you map a view. What other fragmentation it could be? –  Suma Jan 14 '11 at 15:17
    
Yes thats a valid way to do it, but I'm more curious why seeing that it will be reserved in the system page file what is causing the call to fail? is it due to system memory fragementation. The only conclusion I can come to, is the table to hold 2gb of 4kb page files is too big for the system memory to handle so it fails. –  Chad Jan 14 '11 at 15:18

Let's takes up Windows developer position. Assume some user perform following steps:

  1. Create memory mapping.
  2. Populate some memory with sensitive data
  3. Unmap from file
  4. Continue using memory
  5. Windows need to unload these pages for critical tasks.

Resolution - mapped memory should feat for swapping. But it doesn't means that mapped will be swapped.

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