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Any quick way to set an HTML text input (<input type=text />) to only allow numeric keystrokes(plus '.')?

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36  
Many solutions here only work when keys are pressed. These will fail if people paste text using the menu, or if they drag and drop text into the text input. I've been bitten by that before. Be careful! –  Bennett McElwee Jan 24 '11 at 21:09
38  
@JuliusA - you always always need server-side validation anyway. –  Stephen P Nov 23 '11 at 1:57
17  
<input type="text" onkeypress='return event.charCode >= 48 && event.charCode <= 57'></input> –  Droogans Jan 20 '13 at 20:13
5  
@Droogans notice that also disables any other key, like TAB to go to the next input or any other shortcut not directly involved with input like cmd+R for refreshing the website if the input is focused. –  aperezroca Nov 5 '13 at 9:54

37 Answers 37

up vote 115 down vote accepted

HTML 5 (does not require JavaScript, but may not work with older browsers)

<input type="number">

Try input type=number to see the HTML5 version in action.

JavaScript (rough and ready)

<input type="text" onkeypress='return event.charCode >= 48 && event.charCode <= 57'></input>

jQuery

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("#txtboxToFilter").keydown(function (e) {
        // Allow: backspace, delete, tab, escape, enter and .
        if ($.inArray(e.keyCode, [46, 8, 9, 27, 13, 110, 190]) !== -1 ||
             // Allow: Ctrl+A
            (e.keyCode == 65 && e.ctrlKey === true) || 
             // Allow: home, end, left, right
            (e.keyCode >= 35 && e.keyCode <= 39)) {
                 // let it happen, don't do anything
                 return;
        }
        // Ensure that it is a number and stop the keypress
        if ((e.shiftKey || (e.keyCode < 48 || e.keyCode > 57)) && (e.keyCode < 96 || e.keyCode > 105)) {
            e.preventDefault();
        }
    });
});

More complex validation options

If you want to do some other validation bits and pieces, this could be handy:

http://www.javascript-coder.com/html-form/javascript-form-validation.phtml

But don't forget you still must do server side validation!

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1  
Very useful link, +1 I will accept this solution thanks for the other suggestions below guys –  Julius A Jan 22 '09 at 15:05
2  
Although this would be a good choice, this still allows to enter characters like /, multiple dots, other operators etc. –  Mahendra Mar 12 '13 at 19:36
3  
Still not supported by Firefox 21 (I don't even talk about IE9 or earlier version ...) –  JBE May 24 '13 at 17:40
4  
The input type number is not meant to be used to make your input only accept numbers. It's meant for inputs which specify a 'number of items'. Chrome for example adds two small arrows to increase of decrease the number by one. A proper numberic-only input is a kind of ridiculous omission to HTML. –  Erwin Jun 28 '13 at 8:45
2  
The type="number" does not actually prevent entering invalid text into the field; appears that you can even cut and paste garbage data into the field, even in chrome. –  perfectionist Jun 13 at 11:15

Use this DOM

<input type='text' onkeypress='validate(event)' />

And this script

function validate(evt) {
  var theEvent = evt || window.event;
  var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
  key = String.fromCharCode( key );
  var regex = /[0-9]|\./;
  if( !regex.test(key) ) {
    theEvent.returnValue = false;
    if(theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();
  }
}
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10  
german-settings on an eeepc 900. some key's for good usabiliy do not work: - backspace (keyCode: 8) - navigation key left and right (keyCode: 37, 38) copy and paste is also possible... –  Michael Piendl Sep 10 '09 at 18:24
3  
change to if (theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault(); as it's not supported by all browsers –  pstanton Oct 24 '09 at 1:25
6  
Most people do care, having a script error show up reflects poorly on your site. –  Robert Jeppesen Apr 26 '10 at 21:37
8  
few problems with this code. You can enter . more than one time, second it does not allow delete key, any solution? –  coure2011 May 16 '11 at 11:09
4  
I cared about backspace, delete and arrows not working. If you remove "theEvent.keycode ||", and add: "if( /[ -~]/ && !regex.test(key) ) {" then it does work better (for ASCII/UTF anyway). But then it won't reject chinese characters! :) –  Sam Watkins Jun 3 '11 at 7:44

I've searched long and hard for a good answer to this, and we desperately need <input type="number", but short of that, these 2 are the most concise ways I could come up with:

<input type="text" 
       onkeyup="this.value=this.value.replace(/[^\d]/,'')">

If you dislike the non-accepted character showing for a split-second before being erased, the method below is my solution. Note the numerous additional conditions, this is to avoid disabling all sorts of navigation and hotkeys. If anyone knows how to compactify this, let us know!

<input type="text" 
onkeydown="return ( event.ctrlKey || event.altKey 
                    || (47<event.keyCode && event.keyCode<58 && event.shiftKey==false) 
                    || (95<event.keyCode && event.keyCode<106)
                    || (event.keyCode==8) || (event.keyCode==9) 
                    || (event.keyCode>34 && event.keyCode<40) 
                    || (event.keyCode==46) )">
share|improve this answer
2  
input type="number" is coming in HTML 5 - and you could use JavaScript as a fall-back polyfill... stevefenton.co.uk/Content/Blog/Date/201105/Blog/… –  Steve Fenton May 23 '11 at 23:06
1  
Good method but can be broken by pressing and holding a non-acceptable key –  Scott Brown Nov 16 '11 at 16:24
1  
Change the regex to /[^\d+]/ and it works with holding down –  boecko Apr 24 '12 at 17:01
2  
He wanted to allow . too. You should actually make it /[^0-9.]/g –  Qsario Aug 1 '12 at 7:20

HTML5 has <input type=number>, which sounds right for you. Currently, only Opera supports it natively, but there is a project that has a JavaScript implementation.

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And one more example, which works great for me:

function validateNumber(event) {
    var key = window.event ? event.keyCode : event.which;

    if (event.keyCode == 8 || event.keyCode == 46
     || event.keyCode == 37 || event.keyCode == 39) {
        return true;
    }
    else if ( key < 48 || key > 57 ) {
        return false;
    }
    else return true;
};

Also attach to keypress event

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('[id^=edit]').keypress(validateNumber);
});

And html:

<input type="input" id="edit1" value="0" size="5" maxlength="5" />
share|improve this answer

2 solutions:

Use a form validator (for example with jQuery validation plugin)

Do a check during the onblur (i.e. when the user leaves the field) event of the input field, with the regular expression:

<script type="text/javascript">
function testField(field) {
    var regExpr = new RegExp("^\d*\.?\d*$");
    if (!regExpr.test(field.value)) {
      // Case of error
      field.value = "";
    }
}

</script>

<input type="text" ... onblur="testField(this);"/>
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1  
Escape . with \. –  AnthonyWJones Jan 22 '09 at 16:12

I opted to use a combination of the two answers mentioned here i.e.

<input type="number" />

and

function isNumberKey(evt){
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode
    return !(charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57));
}

<input type="text" onkeypress="return isNumberKey(event);">

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1  
@peimanF. Thanks for pointing out the typo! –  Mahendra Jul 18 at 18:49

HTML5 supports regexes, so you could use this:

<input id="numbersOnly" pattern="[0-9.]+" type="text">

Warning: Some browsers don't support this yet.

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4  
HTML5 also has <input type=number>. –  Mathias Bynens Oct 18 '11 at 9:30
7  
Pattern only gets checked on submit. You can still enter letters. –  Erwin Jun 28 '13 at 9:01

so simple.... // In Javascript Function (can use HTML or PHP).

function isNumberKey(evt){
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode;
    if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57))
        return false;
    return true;
}

In Your Form Input :

<input type=text name=form_number size=20 maxlength=12 onkeypress='return isNumberKey(event)'>

With input max. (these above, is allow for 12 Digit number)

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If you want to suggest to the device(maybe a mobile phone) between alpha or numeric you can use <input type="number">

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JavaScript

function validateNumber(evt) {
    var e = evt || window.event;
    var key = e.keyCode || e.which;

    if (!e.shiftKey && !e.altKey && !e.ctrlKey &&
    // numbers   
    key >= 48 && key <= 57 ||
    // Numeric keypad
    key >= 96 && key <= 105 ||
    // Backspace and Tab and Enter
    key == 8 || key == 9 || key == 13 ||
    // Home and End
    key == 35 || key == 36 ||
    // left and right arrows
    key == 37 || key == 39 ||
    // Del and Ins
    key == 46 || key == 45) {
        // input is VALID
    }
    else {
        // input is INVALID
        e.returnValue = false;
        if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();
    }
}

additional you could add comma, period and minus (,.-)

  // comma, period and minus, . on keypad
  key == 190 || key == 188 || key == 109 || key == 110 ||

HTML

<input type="text" onkeydown="validateNumber(event);"/ >
share|improve this answer

A short and sweet implementation using jQuery and replace() instead of looking at event.keyCode or event.which:

$('input.numeric').live('keyup', function(e) {
  $(this).val($(this).val().replace(/[^0-9]/g, ''));
});

Only small side effect that the typed letter appears momentarily and CTRL/CMD + A seems to behave a bit strange.

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if you just want to only allow numbers 0-9 on a input, you can just remove all non numeric characters, without messing about charCodes and arrows ctrl and others kinds of keyboars, and this fix a string pasted or draged to a input.

this have a advantage that you don't have to worry about browser messy of keyEvents. you can use this to allow letters and -,. but this cant deal with valid numbers like (0.1.4- is not a integer nor float), in this case this others guys solutions is better.

LIVE DEMO

<input type="text" id="number" size="100" value="type a number here">

Javascript

addEvent(document.getElementById('number'),'keyup',validate);
addEvent(document.getElementById('number'),'mouseover',validate);

function validate(event){   
    var charsAllowed="0123456789";
    var allowed;
    for(var i=0;i<this.value.length;i++){       
        allowed=false;
        for(var j=0;j<charsAllowed.length;j++){
            if( this.value.charAt(i)==charsAllowed.charAt(j) ){ allowed=true; }
        }
        if(allowed==false){ this.value = this.value.replace(this.value.charAt(i),""); i--; }
    }
    return true;
}

yes, regex is less work but not faster than this.

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<input name="amount" type="text" value="Only number in here"/> 

<script>
    $('input[name=amount]').keyup(function(){
        $(this).val($(this).val().replace(/[^\d]/,''));
    });
</script>
share|improve this answer

input type="number" is html5 attribute.

In other case this will help you.

function isNumberKey(evt){
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode
    if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57))
        return false;
    return true;
}

<input type="number" name="somecode" onkeypress="return isNumberKey(event)"/>
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Just an other variant with jQuery using

$(".numeric").keypress(function() {
    return (/\d/.test(String.fromCharCode(event.which) ))
});
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This is the extended version of geowa4's solution. Supports min and max attributes. If the number is out of range, the previous value will be shown.

You can test it here.

Usage: <input type=text class='number' maxlength=3 min=1 max=500>

function number(e) {
var theEvent = e || window.event;
var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
if(key!=13&&key!=9){//allow enter and tab
  key = String.fromCharCode( key );
  var regex = /[0-9]|\./;
  if( !regex.test(key)) {
    theEvent.returnValue = false;
    if(theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();
    }   
  }
}

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("input[type=text]").filter(".number,.NUMBER").on({
        "focus":function(e){
         $(e.target).data('oldValue',$(e.target).val());
            },
        "keypress":function(e){
                e.target.oldvalue = e.target.value;
                number(e);
            },
        "change":function(e){
            var t = e.target;
            var min = $(t).attr("min");
            var max = $(t).attr("max");
            var val = parseInt($(t).val(),10);          
            if( val<min || max<val)
                {
                    alert("Error!");
                    $(t).val($(t).data('oldValue'));
                }

            }       
    });     
});

If the inputs are dynamic use this:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("body").on("focus","input[type=text].number,.NUMBER",function(e){
        $(e.target).data('oldValue',$(e.target).val());
    }); 
    $("body").on("keypress","input[type=text].number,.NUMBER",function(e){
        e.target.oldvalue = e.target.value;
        number(e);
    }); 
    $("body").on("change","input[type=text].number,.NUMBER",function(e){
        var t = e.target
        var min = $(t).attr("min");
        var max = $(t).attr("max");
        var val = parseInt($(t).val());         
        if( val<min || max<val)
            {
                alert("Error!");
                $(t).val($(t).data('oldValue'));
            }
    }); 
});
share|improve this answer

this is an improved function :

function validateNumber(evt) {
  var theEvent = evt || window.event;
  var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
  if ((key < 48 || key > 57) && !(key == 8 || key == 9 || key == 13 || key == 37 || key == 39 || key == 46) ){
    theEvent.returnValue = false;
    if (theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Javascript code:

function validate(evt)

 {

  if(evt.keyCode!=8)

  {

  var theEvent = evt || window.event;

  var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;

  key = String.fromCharCode( key );


  var regex = /[0-9]|\./;

  if( !regex.test(key) )
 {

    theEvent.returnValue = false;

    if(theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();

  }

  }

}

HTML code:

<input type='text' name='price' value='0' onkeypress='validate(event)'/>

works perfectly because backspace keycode is 8 and regex expression doesnt let it so its a easy way to bypass the bug :)

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The best way (allow ALL type of numbers - real negative, real positive, iinteger negative, integer positive) is:

$(input).keypress(function (evt){
    var theEvent = evt || window.event;
    var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
    key = String.fromCharCode( key );
    var regex = /[-\d\.]/; // dowolna liczba (+- ,.) :)
    var objRegex = /^-?\d*[\.]?\d*$/;
    var val = $(evt.target).val();
    if(!regex.test(key) || !objRegex.test(val+key) || 
            !theEvent.keyCode == 46 || !theEvent.keyCode == 8) {
        theEvent.returnValue = false;
        if(theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();
    };
}); 
share|improve this answer

Remember the regional differences (Euros use periods and commas in the reverse way as Americans), plus the minus sign (or the convention of wrapping a number in parentheses to indicate negative), plus exponential notation (I'm reaching on that one).

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You can attach to the key down event and then filter keys according to what you need, for example:

<input id="FIELD_ID" name="FIELD_ID" onkeypress="return validateNUM(event,this);"  type="text">

And the actual javascript handler would be:

function validateNUM(e,field)
{
    var key = getKeyEvent(e)
    if (specialKey(key)) return true;
    if ((key >= 48 && key <= 57) || (key == 46)){ 
        if (key != 46)
            return true;
        else{  
            if (field.value.search(/\./) == -1 && field.value.length > 0) 
                return true;
            else 
                return false;
        }       
    }

function getKeyEvent(e){
    var keynum
    var keychar
    var numcheck
    if(window.event) // IE
        keynum = e.keyCode
    else if(e.which) // Netscape/Firefox/Opera
        keynum = e.which
    return keynum;
}
share|improve this answer

You can also compare input value (which is treated as string by default) to itself forced as numeric, like:

if(event.target.value == event.target.value * 1) {
    // returns true if input value is numeric string
}

However, you need to bind that to event like keyup etc.

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You can replace the Shurok function with:

$(".numeric").keypress(function() {
    return (/[0123456789,.]/.test(String.fromCharCode(Event.which) ))
});
share|improve this answer

I tweaked it some, but it needs a lot more work to conform to the JavaScript weirding way.

function validateNumber(myEvent,decimal) {
    var e = myEvent || window.event;
    var key = e.keyCode || e.which;

    if (e.shiftKey) {
    } else if (e.altKey) {
    } else if (e.ctrlKey) {
    } else if (key === 48) { // 0
    } else if (key === 49) { // 1
    } else if (key === 50) { // 2
    } else if (key === 51) { // 3
    } else if (key === 52) { // 4
    } else if (key === 53) { // 5
    } else if (key === 54) { // 6
    } else if (key === 55) { // 7
    } else if (key === 56) { // 8
    } else if (key === 57) { // 9

    } else if (key === 96) { // Numeric keypad 0
    } else if (key === 97) { // Numeric keypad 1
    } else if (key === 98) { // Numeric keypad 2
    } else if (key === 99) { // Numeric keypad 3
    } else if (key === 100) { // Numeric keypad 4
    } else if (key === 101) { // Numeric keypad 5
    } else if (key === 102) { // Numeric keypad 6
    } else if (key === 103) { // Numeric keypad 7
    } else if (key === 104) { // Numeric keypad 8
    } else if (key === 105) { // Numeric keypad 9

    } else if (key === 8) { // Backspace
    } else if (key === 9) { // Tab
    } else if (key === 13) { // Enter
    } else if (key === 35) { // Home
    } else if (key === 36) { // End
    } else if (key === 37) { // Left Arrow
    } else if (key === 39) { // Right Arrow
    } else if (key === 190 && decimal) { // decimal
    } else if (key === 110 && decimal) { // period on keypad
    // } else if (key === 188) { // comma
    } else if (key === 109) { // minus
    } else if (key === 46) { // Del
    } else if (key === 45) { // Ins
    } else {
        e.returnValue = false;
        if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();
    }
}

And then it's called via:

$('input[name=Price]').keydown(function(myEvent) {
    validateNumber(myEvent,true);
});
share|improve this answer
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Allow Only Numbers
</HEAD>

<BODY>
<script language="JavaScript">
function onlyNumbers(evt)
{
var e = event || evt; // for trans-browser compatibility
var charCode = e.which || e.keyCode;

if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57))
    return false;

return true;

}
</script>
<input type="text" onkeypress="return onlyNumbers();">
</BODY>
</HTML>
share|improve this answer

another easy way with jquery:

     $('.Numeric').bind('keydown',function(e){
             if (e.which < 48 ||  e.which > 57)
                return false;
                return true;
       })           

now just set your each inputs class to Numeric, like:

     <input type="text" id="inp2" name="inp2" class='Numeric' />
share|improve this answer

This removes any bad character instantly, allows only 1 dot, is short and allows backspace etc.

$('.numberInput').keyup(function () {
    s=$(this).val();
    if (!/^\d*\.?\d*$/.test(s)) $(this).val(s.substr(0,s.length-1));
});
share|improve this answer

How about this DOM...

<input type = "text" onkeydown = "validate(event)"/>

...and this script?

validate = function(evt)
{
    if ([8, 46, 37, 39, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 35, 36].indexOf(evt.keyCode || evt.which) == -1)
    {
        evt.returnValue = false;
        if(evt.preventDefault){evt.preventDefault();}
    }
}

...OR this script, without indexOf, using 2 for's...

validate = function(evt)
{
    var CharValidate = new Array("08", "046", "039", "948", "235");
    var number_pressed = false;
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        for (Ncount = 0; Ncount < parseInt(CharValidate[i].substring(0, 1)) + 1; Ncount++)
        {
            if ((evt.keyCode || evt.which) == parseInt(CharValidate[i].substring(1, CharValidate[i].lenght)) + Ncount)
            {
                number_pressed = true;
            }
        }
    }
    if (number_pressed == false)
    {
        evt.returnValue = false;
        if(evt.preventDefault){evt.preventDefault();}
    }
}

I used the onkeydown attribute instead of onkeypress because the onkeydown attribute is checked before onkeypress attribute. The problem would be in the google chrome browser.

With the attribute "onkeypress", TAB would be uncontrollable with "preventDefault" on google chrome, however, with the attribute "onkeydown", TAB becomes controllable!

ASCII Code for TAB => 9

The first script have less code than the second, however, the array of ASCII characters must have all the keys.

The second script is much bigger than the first, but the array does not need all keys, the first digit in each position of the array is the number of times each position will be readed. For each reading, will be incremented 1 to the next one. For example:




NCount = 0

48 + NCount = 48

NCount + +

48 + NCount = 49

NCount + +

...

48 + NCount = 57




In the case of numerical keys are only 10 (0 - 9), but if they were 1 million would not make sense to create an array with all these keys.

ASCII Codes:

  • 8 ==> (Backspace);
  • 46 => (Delete);
  • 37 => (left arrow);
  • 39 => (right arrow);
  • 48 - 57 => (numbers);
  • 36 => (home);
  • 35 => (end);

I'm gonna sleep now!!

This is my first post on StackOverflow :P

share|improve this answer
<input id="numbers" pattern="[0-9.]+" type="number">

you can use pattern for this. here you can see the complete mobile website interface tips

share|improve this answer

protected by Community Jun 17 at 15:44

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