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I am tired of writing x > min && x < max so i wawnt to write a simple function but I am not sure if I am doing it right... actually I am not cuz I get an error:

    bool inBetween<T>(T x, T min, T max) where T:IComparable
    {
        return (x > min && x < max);
    }

errors:

Operator '>' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'
Operator '<' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'  

may I have a bad understanding of the where part in the function declaring

note: for those who are going to tell me that I will be writing more code than before... think on readability =) any help will be appreciated

EDIT

deleted cuz it was resolved =)

ANOTHER EDIT

so after some headache I came out with this (ummm) thing following @Jay Idea of extreme readability:

public static class test
{
    public static comparision Between<T>(this T a,T b) where T : IComparable
    {
        var ttt = new comparision();
        ttt.init(a);
        ttt.result = a.CompareTo(b) > 0;
        return ttt;
    }

    public static bool And<T>(this comparision state, T c) where T : IComparable
    {
        return state.a.CompareTo(c) < 0 && state.result;
    }

    public class comparision
    {
        public IComparable a;
        public bool result;          
        public void init<T>(T ia) where T : IComparable
        {
            a = ia;
        }

    }
}

now you can compare anything with extreme readability =)

what do you think.. I am no performance guru so any tweaks are welcome

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1  
To your EDIT: extension methods must be static and put in a static class. –  Danny Chen Jan 14 '11 at 18:11
    
oh!!!! yes thats right... my bad =) –  Luiscencio Jan 14 '11 at 18:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

IComparable means the object implements a CompareTo method. Use

public static bool InBetween<T>(this T x, T min, T max) where T:IComparable<T>
{
    return x.CompareTo(min) > 0 && x.CompareTo(max) < 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Sparkie could you point me to a resource to understand your change? –  Yuriy Faktorovich Jan 14 '11 at 19:11
    
When you use the non-generic IComparable, it has a .CompareTo() method which expects an object. So in when min or max are passed to it, they need to be objects. (They may be structs for instance, which are not objects, they're valuetypes). If they are structs, they are boxed, which basically creates an object to reference the struct, but this can cost over 10% more in some situations, resulting in slower code (particularly noticeable when used on collections). –  Mark H Jan 14 '11 at 19:46
1  
In the case of the generic IComparable<T>, the CompareTo() method expects a T, which is what min and max already are constrained to. No boxing is needed in that case. –  Mark H Jan 14 '11 at 19:47
    
@Sparkie didn't realize I was Constraining to the wrong interface. Thought they were the same for some reason. Thank you. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Jan 14 '11 at 19:53

You need to use the .CompareTo method of your variable and check for < and > 0. (This is why you've constrained T to IComparable).

return (x.CompareTo(min) > 0 && x.CompareTo(max) < 0);
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return x.CompareTo(min) > 0 && x.CompareTo(max) < 0;

If you're going for maximum readability, you could use an extension method on IComparable<T>, and create a syntax like:

return 5.IsBetween(10).and(20);

or

return 5.IsBetween(10.and(20));

Here is an implementation for the second example:

public interface IRange<T>
{
    bool ContainsInclusive(T value);
    bool ContainsExclusive(T value);
}

public class ComparableRange<T> : IRange<T> where T : IComparable<T>
{
    T min;
    T max;

    public ComparableRange(T min, T max)
    {
        this.min = min;
        this.max = max;
    }

    public bool ContainsInclusive(T value)
    {
        return value.CompareTo(min) >= 0 && value.CompareTo(max) <= 0;
    }

    public bool ContainsExclusive(T value)
    {
        return value.CompareTo(min) > 0 && value.CompareTo(max) < 0;
    }
}

public static class ComparableExtensions
{
    public static IRange<T> and<T>(this T min, T max) where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        return new ComparableRange<T>(min, max);
    }

    public static bool IsBetween<T>(this T value, IRange<T> range) where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        return range.ContainsExclusive(value);
    }
}
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Could you show how you'd implement those extensions. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Jan 14 '11 at 18:11
    
still waiting for that golden implementation –  Luiscencio Jan 14 '11 at 18:30
    
@Yuriy @Luiscencio I added an update with an example implementation. This is an exercise; not a recommendation. You could do the same thing with a tuple, instead of a range, but you'd be putting the actual comparison logic in the extension method. –  Jay Jan 14 '11 at 19:00
    
!!! you actually didi it that is what I call commitment =) –  Luiscencio Jan 14 '11 at 19:05
    
check my version and tell me what you think (edited OP) –  Luiscencio Jan 14 '11 at 19:58

Use IComparable.CompareTo():

a.CompareTo(b) > 0 <=> a>b

a.CompareTo(b) = 0 <=> a=b

a.CompareTo(b) < 0 <=> a<b

public bool InBetween<T>(T x, T min, T max) where T:IComparable
{
    return x.CompareTo(min) * x.CompareTo(max) < 0;
}
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1  
Clever choice of multiplication, even if it's not the most transparent solution. –  Adam Robinson Jan 14 '11 at 17:57
    
I'd also be curious as to the performance hit –  Yuriy Faktorovich Jan 14 '11 at 18:02
1  
Multiplication is not a clever choice. Consider someone else use something like this: bool result = InBetween(5,10,4);, which returns true. So that you need to add a check to make sure max is greater than min, if not then return false, which makes the method more complicated. –  Danny Chen Jan 14 '11 at 18:15

You can try adding a constraint that T is an IComparable, and then using CompareTo instead of < and >.

But this probably won't let you send all the value types you may want to. In that case, just create the overloads you need, without generics.

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