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Saw this. Why the explicit cast to IDisposable? Is this just a shorthand to ensure that IDisposable is called on exiting the using block?

using (proxy as IDisposable)
{
  string s = proxy.Stuff()                                    
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

This "trick", if you can call it that, is most likely due to proxy being of a type that the compiler can't verify really implements IDisposable.

The nice thing about the using directive, is that if the parameter to it is null, then no call to Dispose will be done upon exiting the scope of the using statement.

So the code you've shown is actually short-hand for:

var disposable = proxy as IDisposable;
try
{
    string s = proxy.Stuff();
}
finally
{
    if (disposable != null)
        disposable.Dispose();
}

In other words, it says "if this object implements IDisposable, I need to dispose of it when I'm done with the following piece of code."

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+1 for "if this object implements IDisposable..." –  Justin Jan 14 '11 at 21:09

It's unnecessary as the using statement is explicitly tied to the IDisposable interface, per the MSDN docs

Provides a convenient syntax that ensures the correct use of IDisposable objects.

edit: The C# language spec (sec. 8.13) provides three possible expansions for the using statement's syntactic sugar:

A using statement of the form

using (ResourceType resource = expression) statement

corresponds to one of three possible expansions. When ResourceType is a non-nullable value type, the expansion is

{
   ResourceType resource = expression;
   try {
      statement;
   }
   finally {
      ((IDisposable)resource).Dispose();
   }
}

Otherwise, when ResourceType is a nullable value type or a reference type other than dynamic, the expansion is

{
   ResourceType resource = expression;
   try {
      statement;
   }
   finally {
      if (resource != null) ((IDisposable)resource).Dispose();
   }
}

Otherwise, when ResourceType is dynamic, the expansion is

{
   ResourceType resource = expression;
   IDisposable d = (IDisposable)resource;
   try {
      statement;
   }
   finally {
      if (d != null) d.Dispose();
   }
}

Note that in each one of these expansions the cast is done anyway, so as originally stated, the as IDisposable is unnecessary.

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2  
What if "proxy" is an object that the programmer "knows" implements IDisposable, but the compiler can't verify it? Why wouldn't the cast be necessary then? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 14 '11 at 20:37
    
Yeah, if there is any reason its to be clear to the reader that proxy extends IDisposable –  Will Jan 14 '11 at 20:37
    
As long as his proxy is not a WCF proxy, in which case it is not safe to use a using block. But that is another topic. –  Pierre-Alain Vigeant Jan 14 '11 at 20:38
    
Although I love a proper expansion of a using statement, I think that saying the cast is unnecessary is not 100% correct in all scenarios. –  Tuzo Jan 17 '11 at 16:04
    
@LasseV.Karlsen: It's not necessary that the programmer knows the object implements IDisposable, but rather that it might do so, and that in cases where it does it must be disposed. Note that factories that return things that might require disposal without the return type implementing or inheriting IDisposable should be considered an extreme anti-pattern, but if code has to work with such factories, the using(foo as IDisposable) is probably the best pattern for doing so. –  supercat Nov 15 '13 at 22:26

This could be required if you are given a proxy instance from somewhere and its static type does not implement IDisposable but you know that the real type may do and you want to make sure it will be disposed e.g.

public class Proxy : ISomeInterface, IDisposable
{
    ...
}

private ISomeInterface Create() { ... }

ISomeInterface proxy = Create();

//won't compile without `as`
using(proxy as IDisposable)
{
    ...
}
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+1 You could also have a similar example with generics. –  Tuzo Jan 14 '11 at 22:12

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