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I am writing a class where the same xml is used between some methods.

e.g.

/**
 * Sample Response:
 * <xmp>
 *      <myXML>
 *          <stuff> data </stuff>
 *      </myXML>
 * </xmp>
 */
 CommonXML Method1();

/**
 * Sample Submission:
 * <xmp>
 *      <myXML>
 *          <stuff> data </stuff>
 *      </myXML>
 * </xmp>
 */
 void Method2(CommonXML xml);

I would like to write my documentation so that if the xml changes I have one resource to modify, rather than updating all of the JavaDoc for the affected methods.

Does anyone know how to accomplish this?

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I guess you can specify one class to create it's java-doc. need to Google though. :) –  Nishant Jan 14 '11 at 20:55
    
I think wanting to re-use variable definitions in Javadoc is a common problem. The fact the OP here asks about an XML document hides how common it is - see stackoverflow.com/questions/7021696/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/1036565/… –  Mark Butler Feb 13 '13 at 15:39
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why not have your documentation read:

/**
 * Returns an XML file conforming to the CommonXML schema, available here 
 * (link-to-schema).
 **/

Then, if you update your XML, you just update your schema?

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1  
You should end the sentence with a period per the JavaDoc guidelines. –  Steve Kuo Jan 14 '11 at 21:42
    
Noted and Fixed. –  JohnnyO Jan 13 '12 at 19:04
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What about using @see to refer to the other method?

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I would document (under duress - actually i think documentation is a waste of time, as its almost always wrong - use tests to document what your system does) the CommonXML object, rather than each method that takes an object of this type.

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+1 for the suggestion to document the CommonXML object (and almost a -1 for thinking documentation is a waste of time.. nothing is more frustrating that debugging code that isn't documented.. reading tests to figure out what the code is supposed to do is far more time-consuming.. documentation is a first-class duty of a developer!) –  jk. Jan 14 '11 at 21:02
    
As 90% of developers time is allegedly spent reading code, i prefer to spend the "documentation" time refactoring the code, so that its really easy to understand. However i understand that people have strongly held views on that kind of thing! –  time4tea Jan 14 '11 at 21:12
    
The comments are used by consumers of what I produce, so relying on code is not a solution I can work with. –  TERACytE Jan 14 '11 at 22:35
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You shouldn't be using Javadoc to repeat specifications that are defined elsewhere. Refer to the specification.

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You could use Doclava's include or sample tag to do this. These tags copy sample text from an arbitrary file into the output javadoc html. The @include tag copies the text verbatim from the given file. The @sample tag copies the text from the given file with some modifications.

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