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I have following bash function in my ~/.bashrc

function gitlab {
  MSG='first commit'
  CMD="git commit -m '${MSG}'"
  echo $CMD
  $CMD
}

Here is the result

$ gitlab 
git commit -m 'first commit'
error: pathspec 'commit'' did not match any file(s) known to git.

What's the fix?

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4 Answers 4

BASH FAQ entry #50: "I'm trying to put a command in a variable, but the complex cases always fail!"

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3  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  gunr2171 Oct 7 '14 at 17:31

Definitely read BashFAQ/050 that Ignacio linked to.

You could try this, though:

function gitlab {
    local PS4='Running: '
    local msg='first commit'
    bash -xc "git commit -m '$msg'"
}
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I suppose you should use \" instead of ' so it should be something like:

CMD="git commit -m \"${MSG}\""
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this solution did not work –  Nick Vanderbilt Jan 14 '11 at 21:46

Try putting your commit message in double quotes, as single and double quotes mean different things to bash.

function gitlab {
  MSG="first commit"
  CMD=`git commit -m \"${MSG}\"`
  echo $CMD
  $CMD
}
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1  
The double quotes escape the single quotes, inhibiting the inhibition. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 14 '11 at 21:17
    
this will definitely not work –  Elalfer Jan 14 '11 at 21:18
1  
In this case (after you've edited your answer) git command will be executed on the line 3 of your script and CMD will have a command output value. So $CMD line will make no sense. –  Elalfer Jan 14 '11 at 22:34

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