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I have the following code in C++:

string str="a b c";
stringstream sstr(str);
vector<string> my_vec((istream_iterator<string>(sstr)), 
                       istream_iterator<string>());

Is there any way to save the use of sstr, something like the following?

vector<string> my_vec((istream_iterator<string>(str)), 
                       istream_iterator<string>());
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Can you please clarify, from what I understand you can create a pointer to the stringstream object to pass around or store as a global variable. Or do you mean save the str variable? –  Jesus Ramos Jan 14 '11 at 21:16
    
What's wrong with sstr? –  GManNickG Jan 14 '11 at 21:17
    
You can certainly do so but it won't necessarily make your code more readable. –  David Heffernan Jan 14 '11 at 21:18
2  
@Qiang so what is the issue? –  David Heffernan Jan 14 '11 at 21:20
2  
I think Qiang wants to write the code without using the variable sstr. i.e. Can we introduce and use a temporary rather than an actual variable (I suppose in an attempt to make the code more readable). –  Loki Astari Jan 14 '11 at 21:24
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

istream_iterator's argument needs to be able to bind to a non-const reference, and a temporary cannot. However, (as Alf points out), ostream happens to have a function, flush(), that returns a non-const reference to itself. So a possibility is:

string str="a b c";
vector<string> my_vec(istream_iterator<string>(
                        static_cast<stringstream&>(stringstream(str).flush())
                        ), istream_iterator<string>());

Though that's an eye-sore. If you're concerned about having too many lines, then use a function:

vector<string> string_to_vector(const string& str)
{
    stringstream sstr(str);
    return vector<string>(istream_iterator<string>(sstr),
                            istream_iterator<string>());
}

Giving:

string str="a b c";
vector<string> my_vec = string_to_vector(str);

This is even cleaner than what you'd get even if you could shorten your code, because now what is being done is not expressed in code but rather the name of a function; the latter is much easier to grasp.


*Of course, we can add boiler-plate code to do silly things:

class temporary_stringstream
{
public:
    temporary_stringstream(const string& str) :
    mStream(str)
    {}

    operator stringstream&()
    {
        // only persists as long as temporary_stringstream!
        return mStream;
    }

private:
    stringstream mStream;
};

Giving:

string str="a b c";
vector<string> my_vec((istream_iterator<string>(temporary_stringstream(str))),
                        istream_iterator<string>());

But this is just as ugly as the first solution.

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1  
There's always flush, delivering a reference. Old jungle trick (although I don't recommend employing it). So, it's not a requirement of "reference to non-temporary object", but just "reference to non-const object". Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 14 '11 at 21:34
    
@Alf: Oh, nice, didn't think it had that sort of member. Is saying "reference to non-const" correct? That makes it seems, to me, like a temporary doesn't work because it's const (though it isn't). –  GManNickG Jan 14 '11 at 21:37
    
I just threw in that const because non-const is requirement of istream_iterator constructor. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 14 '11 at 21:39
    
@Alf: Okay. How's the answer now? –  GManNickG Jan 14 '11 at 21:43
1  
nice, with reference to me :-) :-) :-). seriously, thanks for asking that. but i just happened to have that odd knowledge of flush because i've seen the question before. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 14 '11 at 22:05
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You're using the two-iterator constructor for vector with istream_iterator to split the string by whitespace into a sequence of strings to be stored.

istream_iterator needs an istream, for which there is no direct cast from string. The compiler is not going to infer a stringstream because the constructor for istream_iterator takes a templated type and not explicitly a stringstream. It's just too much of a leap for a compiler to assume that much.

Besides, even if the compiler made such a leap of faith, it would generate the same code as what you already have, so you're no better off in the end.

A better approach might be:

std::vector<std::string> split_words(const std::string& str)
{   size_t offset = str.find_first_not_of(" \t\r\n");
    std::vector<std::string> result;
    while(offset != std::string::npos)
    {   size_t end = str.find_first_of(" \t\r\n", offset);
        if(end != offset)
            result.push_back(std::string(str, offset, end));
        offset = str.find_first_not_of(" \t\r\n", end);
    }
    return result;
}

which takes less code and objects to get the same job done. On my Mac, this is 3203 bytes code and 273 data, while the original three lines of code is 5136 bytes code and 353 data. (I added return my_vec.size(); at the end of main().)

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1  
It's more intuitive for the function to return the result, rather than place it in an argument. –  GManNickG Jan 14 '11 at 22:17
    
It doesn't increase code size, either. Nice. –  Mike DeSimone Jan 14 '11 at 23:08
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Boost has a library dedicated to algorithm on string: check out the Split section :)

std::vector<std::string> vec;
boost::split(vec, "a b c", boost::is_any_of(" ")); 
  // vec == { "a", "b", "c" }

Probably the clearest way to do it :)

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