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I am writing my first razor page today, can't figure out how to enter #if debug #else #endif

How can i enter preprocessor in razor?

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possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/378982/… –  Handcraftsman Jan 14 '11 at 21:46
8  
My point is that you want #if debug in razor but it will always be true. So the answer to your question is that there's no point in doing it as Razor will always compile in debug mode. –  BuildStarted Jan 18 '11 at 21:09
2  
@mamu can you unaccept that answer and accept the one from Shawn? –  Stijn Feb 5 at 18:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 37 down vote accepted
@{
  #if DEBUG
     // your content
  #else
     // your content
  #endif
}

Hope this help.

Sorry! This code always DEBUG.

I was wrong.

and recommended model approach.

if in use only Web, reference HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled property.

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27  
Um...that doesn't work as noted below. The comment on my answer by marcind is one of the developers...oh well –  BuildStarted Jan 15 '11 at 6:08
3  
i noticed it compiled in debug but my comment was just for @{#if DEBUG} syntex part. also i am using HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled till razor get fix for debug mode as it was easy replacement. –  mamu Jan 18 '11 at 5:54
3  
compiles but did not work for me, I used the extension method method below. –  mhanney May 25 '12 at 16:53
2  
-1, doesn't work with the following code (@ sign changed to (at) for SO formatting) @{ #if DEBUG (at)model MyLib.Dev.MyClass #else (at)model MyLib.Prod.MyClass #endif } –  Nuzzolilo Nov 15 '12 at 21:16
10  
Please delete your answer. It's completely wrong. –  Stijn Feb 5 at 8:37

I just created an extension method:

    public static bool IsDebug(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper)
    {
#if DEBUG
      return true;
#else
      return false;
#endif
    }

Then used it in my views like so:

            <section id="sidebar">
              @Html.Partial("_Connect")
@if (!Html.IsDebug())
{ 
              @Html.Partial("_Ads")
}
              <hr />
              @RenderSection("Sidebar", required: false)
            </section>

Since the helper is compiled with the DEBUG/RELEASE symbol, it works.

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14  
Of course this extension method has to go into the MVC project, not into a separate library that might be compiled with different options... –  Eric J. Jul 27 '12 at 1:19
    
Excellent idea! –  Mark Bell Jan 21 at 12:16

There's a far simpler technique built in to HttpContext:

@if (HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled)
{
    // Debug mode is enabled in Web.config.
}

This returns the value of the debug attribute on the system.web.compilation element in the current request's Web.config file.

It's not conditional compilation—since it is, by definition, part of your compiled code—but I consider it a more syntactically elegant approach for most scenarios.

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2  
much better answer, thx! –  nihique Apr 24 '13 at 17:06
1  
Has the advantage you can switch it on in integration test environments to diagnose deployment issues often not seen until installed on non-developer PCs. –  Code Chief Jun 3 '13 at 11:36
    
The simplest answer –  hellyeah Sep 24 '13 at 10:43
2  
I get a null reference exception using this, probably because in Release mode the debug attribute is removed from web.config entirely. –  Alex Angas Feb 27 at 3:55
2  
@JordanGray Thanks for taking a look - I just tried a new project as well and can't repro either! Your solution is working. No time to look further at the moment unfortunately but if I come across the reason i'll update this post. –  Alex Angas Mar 13 at 1:07

C# and ASP.NET MVC: Using #if directive in a view

Actually that answer has the right answer. You're going to have to pass whether or not you're in debug mode via the Model. (or ViewBag) since all views are compiled in debug mode.

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22  
Note that because Razor views are always compiled in Debug mode setting a preprocessor directive in this way will not actually have any effect. You will always execute // your debug stuff –  marcind Jan 14 '11 at 23:07
1  
Heh, yeah, I just realized that when I wrote it. –  BuildStarted Jan 14 '11 at 23:07
    
this is the most correct answer –  arserbin3 Aug 21 '13 at 19:11

By default MVC views are not compiled so #IF DEBUG can't work in a view. If you want to compile view in order to access IF DEBUG config, you need to :

  1. Right click on your project in Visual Studio
  2. Unload project
  3. Edit project

change the following attribute from false to true

<MvcBuildViews>true</MvcBuildViews>

reload your project and then views are going to be compiled.

The only other work around would be to have a function in your code behind

public static Boolean DEBUG(this System.Web.Mvc.WebViewPage page)
{
   var value = false;
   #if(DEBUG)
       value=true;
   #endif
   return value;
}

and then call it from view :

if(DEBUG())
{
  //debug code here
}
else
{
  //release code here
}
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