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I have an image that is Base64 encoded. What is the best way to decode that in Java? Hopefully using only the libraries included with Sun Java 6.

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2  
Here is yet another implementation I recently through together: github.com/n1hility/playground/blob/master/src/main/java/org/… –  Jason Greene Nov 12 '12 at 18:37
2  
Note that if you are developing an Android app, Google has already done this: developer.android.com/reference/android/util/Base64.html –  Raphael Oliveira Feb 4 '13 at 17:26
6  
Please consider marking Jeremy's answer as the accepted answer. –  Duncan Jul 24 '13 at 7:03

15 Answers 15

up vote 290 down vote accepted

As of v6, Java SE ships with JAXB. javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter has static methods that make this easy. See parseBase64Binary() and printBase64Binary().

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12  
However, it seems that the printBase64Binary(..) method doesn't do the MIME version of Base64 ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base64#MIME ), while the private Sun and the Commons implementations use this. Specifically, for String bigger than 76 characters, newlines are added. I didn't find how to configure JAXB's implementation for this behavior... :-( –  KLE Mar 18 '10 at 10:25
7  
however, the sun implementation will ignore newlines. So they are compatible. –  Esben Skov Pedersen Apr 20 '10 at 9:52
1  
Actually isn't inclusion of Linefeeds the standard way; and not adding (theoretically) non-compliant? –  StaxMan Jul 5 '13 at 18:27
3  
Warning! parseBase64Binary will silently skip over invalid characters and will not check for the base64 validity. It is better to use Commons Codec or Guava Base64. Note that Guava rejects newlines and whitespace characters, so you need to parse strings with whitespaces omitted: BaseEncoding.base64().decode(s.replaceAll("\\s", "")) –  Martin Vysny Jul 22 '13 at 11:09
3  
Be careful. This function does not work with data longer than 65000. (java version 1.6) –  Hüseyin Yağlı Sep 21 '13 at 14:35

No need to use commons--Sun ships a base64 encoder with Java. You can import it as such:

import sun.misc.BASE64Decoder;

And then use it like this:

BASE64Decoder decoder = new BASE64Decoder();
byte[] decodedBytes = decoder.decodeBuffer(encodedBytes);

Where encodedBytes is either a java.lang.String or a java.io.InputStream. Just beware that the sun.* classes are not "officially supported" by Sun.

EDIT: Who knew this would be the most controversial answer I'd ever post? I do know that sun.* packages are not supported or guaranteed to continue existing, and I do know about Commons and use it all the time. However, the poster asked for a class that that was "included with Sun Java 6," and that's what I was trying to answer. I agree that Commons is the best way to go in general.

EDIT 2: As amir75 points out below, Java 6+ ships with JAXB, which contains supported code to encode/decode Base64. Please see Jeremy Ross' answer below.

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161  
-1 - this is internal Sun code, is NOT part of J2SE (it, not portable), and may disappear at any time -- Sun explicitly says to NOT use their internal libraries in user code –  kdgregory Jan 22 '09 at 16:08
53  
True, hence my disclaimer at the end. –  MattK Jan 22 '09 at 16:11
16  
This is for a short term project and is just a experiment and don't want to go through the process of approval for a new library. So this is the correct answer to this question. –  Ryan P Jan 22 '09 at 16:23
42  
Bzzt. In a professional environment, using an unsupported, undocumented feature is never the correct decision. And in a corporate environment, "experiments" become "production code" with no chance to fix the hacks. –  kdgregory Jan 22 '09 at 17:03
26  
In a research department where that code is marked as experiment and when it is marked always gets scrapped it is the correct decision. –  Ryan P Jan 22 '09 at 20:17

Here is a working example using Apache Commons codec:

import org.apache.commons.codec.binary.Base64;
import org.apache.commons.codec.binary.StringUtils;

public String decode(String s) {
    return StringUtils.newStringUtf8(Base64.decodeBase64(s));
}
public String encode(String s) {
    return Base64.encodeBase64String(StringUtils.getBytesUtf8(s));
}

Maven / sbt repo: commons-codec, commons-codec, 1.8.

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1  
@Martin — I was thinking of having the full names in the instructions. This would be more compatible and more ready-to-use. I would not have looked at the imports. My eyes have developed an import blindness, like the banner blindness. And, even though, we don't take the imports when we copy / paste the Java code. In addition, the import of StringUtils can conflict with the other StringUtils — who is much more common ;-) —. –  Nicolas Barbulesco Apr 11 '13 at 9:42
    
Hi Nicolas, I see what you mean now. It's a good point! I like the term "import blindness" :) I'll keep the fully qualified names in the imports because the method bodies fit on a single line like this on SO. Hopefully it's clear to the reader where Base64 and StringUtils come from this way and they can resolve a compile error easily. Thanks for your input! –  Martin Konicek Apr 11 '13 at 13:45
    

Specifically in Commons Codec: class Base64 to decode(byte[] array) or encode(byte[] array)

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7  
You can link the text 'Commons Codec' to the project page. That way this answer would be better than Kevin's :) –  mmutilva Jun 2 '09 at 17:19
1  
I know this is an old question, but Why isn't this the accepted answer? Isn't the commons codec included with most java installations, and far fewer lines of code to use than rolling your own version? –  Li Haoyi Apr 5 '12 at 14:22
2  
@LiHaoyi The question asked for libraries that shipped with Sun's JDK, which does not include anything from the Commons. –  Ti Strga Feb 26 '13 at 15:53
    
False track. These methods do not exist ! –  Nicolas Barbulesco Apr 10 '13 at 14:43

As of Java 8, there is an officially supported API for Base64 encoding and decoding. In time this will probably become the default choice.

The API includes the class java.util.Base64 and its nested classes. It supports three different flavors: basic, URL safe, and MIME.

Sample code using the "basic" encoding:

import java.util.Base64;

byte[] bytes = "Hello, World!".getBytes("UTF-8");
String encoded = Base64.getEncoder().encodeToString(bytes);
byte[] decoded = Base64.getDecoder().decode(encoded);

The documentation for java.util.Base64 includes several more methods for configuring encoders and decoders, and for using different classes as inputs and outputs (byte arrays, strings, ByteBuffers, java.io streams).

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I am using Java 8. Is this the recommended approach if using Java 8? –  JohnMerlino Jun 24 at 20:52
    
@JohnMerlino if compatibility with older Java versions is not required, I would recommend using this API as the JRE has a stronger compatibility policy than most libraries. Also, being included in the JRE, it doesn't constrain your dependencies in any possible way. –  Andrea Jun 25 at 10:56

My solution is fastest and easiest.

public class MyBase64 {

    private final static char[] ALPHABET = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/".toCharArray();

    private static int[]  toInt   = new int[128];

    static {
        for(int i=0; i< ALPHABET.length; i++){
            toInt[ALPHABET[i]]= i;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Translates the specified byte array into Base64 string.
     *
     * @param buf the byte array (not null)
     * @return the translated Base64 string (not null)
     */
    public static String encode(byte[] buf){
        int size = buf.length;
        char[] ar = new char[((size + 2) / 3) * 4];
        int a = 0;
        int i=0;
        while(i < size){
            byte b0 = buf[i++];
            byte b1 = (i < size) ? buf[i++] : 0;
            byte b2 = (i < size) ? buf[i++] : 0;

            int mask = 0x3F;
            ar[a++] = ALPHABET[(b0 >> 2) & mask];
            ar[a++] = ALPHABET[((b0 << 4) | ((b1 & 0xFF) >> 4)) & mask];
            ar[a++] = ALPHABET[((b1 << 2) | ((b2 & 0xFF) >> 6)) & mask];
            ar[a++] = ALPHABET[b2 & mask];
        }
        switch(size % 3){
            case 1: ar[--a]  = '=';
            case 2: ar[--a]  = '=';
        }
        return new String(ar);
    }

    /**
     * Translates the specified Base64 string into a byte array.
     *
     * @param s the Base64 string (not null)
     * @return the byte array (not null)
     */
    public static byte[] decode(String s){
        int delta = s.endsWith( "==" ) ? 2 : s.endsWith( "=" ) ? 1 : 0;
        byte[] buffer = new byte[s.length()*3/4 - delta];
        int mask = 0xFF;
        int index = 0;
        for(int i=0; i< s.length(); i+=4){
            int c0 = toInt[s.charAt( i )];
            int c1 = toInt[s.charAt( i + 1)];
            buffer[index++]= (byte)(((c0 << 2) | (c1 >> 4)) & mask);
            if(index >= buffer.length){
                return buffer;
            }
            int c2 = toInt[s.charAt( i + 2)];
            buffer[index++]= (byte)(((c1 << 4) | (c2 >> 2)) & mask);
            if(index >= buffer.length){
                return buffer;
            }
            int c3 = toInt[s.charAt( i + 3 )];
            buffer[index++]= (byte)(((c2 << 6) | c3) & mask);
        }
        return buffer;
    } 

}
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13  
it is not buggy! - read the javadoc comments... the parameter of decode(..) is base64 String not just any String. byte[] b1 = {1,2,3}; byte[] b2 = decode(encode(b1)); System.out.println(Arrays.equals( b1, b2 )); // => true –  GeorgeK May 5 '11 at 14:23
4  
Fastest and easiest ?? Reinventing the wheel ?! –  Nicolas Barbulesco Apr 10 '13 at 14:14
7  
Why is fastest? Do you have any benchmark? –  Lluis Martinez Apr 11 '13 at 9:19
3  
I ran some tests comparing this class with commons-codec and it seems to work OK. I needed something simple like this because I only needed base64 encoding and didn't want all the extra stuff that commons-codec provides, thanks. –  Michael Jul 22 '13 at 16:31
1  
Is this trustful? It seems to be the easiest if you don't want to import external libraries. –  Felipe Micaroni Lalli Oct 22 '13 at 20:53

Guava now has Base64 decoding built in.

Use BaseEncoding.base64().decode()

As for dealing with possible whitespace in input the recommended way of doing that is the following way

BaseEncoding.base64().decode(CharMatcher.WHITESPACE.removeFrom(...));

See this discussion for more information

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1  
Guava 14 is still a release candidate, but this still gets my upvote -- by the time it reaches any decent position it should be golden :-) –  Peter Becker Jan 9 '13 at 3:34
    
Guava base64 decoder rejects newline and space characters so you have to remove them beforehand. –  Martin Vysny Jul 22 '13 at 11:26

No matter what type of app your using (experiment or not), it's just as simple as creating a single Base64.java file in your utils package using the code here:

http://migbase64.sourceforge.net/

Look at the performance charts and notice the difference: 4-5 times as fast.

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Migbase64 doesn't support stream's, and neither does the commons implementation, however javax.mail implementation does, so it is probably more efficient to use javax.mail in some cases. –  haridsv Dec 17 '10 at 3:50

Here's my own implementation, if it could be useful to someone :

public class Base64Coder {

    // The line separator string of the operating system.
    private static final String systemLineSeparator = System.getProperty("line.separator");

    // Mapping table from 6-bit nibbles to Base64 characters.
    private static final char[] map1 = new char[64];
       static {
          int i=0;
          for (char c='A'; c<='Z'; c++) map1[i++] = c;
          for (char c='a'; c<='z'; c++) map1[i++] = c;
          for (char c='0'; c<='9'; c++) map1[i++] = c;
          map1[i++] = '+'; map1[i++] = '/'; }

    // Mapping table from Base64 characters to 6-bit nibbles.
    private static final byte[] map2 = new byte[128];
       static {
          for (int i=0; i<map2.length; i++) map2[i] = -1;
          for (int i=0; i<64; i++) map2[map1[i]] = (byte)i; }

    /**
    * Encodes a string into Base64 format.
    * No blanks or line breaks are inserted.
    * @param s  A String to be encoded.
    * @return   A String containing the Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static String encodeString (String s) {
       return new String(encode(s.getBytes())); }

    /**
    * Encodes a byte array into Base 64 format and breaks the output into lines of 76 characters.
    * This method is compatible with <code>sun.misc.BASE64Encoder.encodeBuffer(byte[])</code>.
    * @param in  An array containing the data bytes to be encoded.
    * @return    A String containing the Base64 encoded data, broken into lines.
    */
    public static String encodeLines (byte[] in) {
       return encodeLines(in, 0, in.length, 76, systemLineSeparator); }

    /**
    * Encodes a byte array into Base 64 format and breaks the output into lines.
    * @param in            An array containing the data bytes to be encoded.
    * @param iOff          Offset of the first byte in <code>in</code> to be processed.
    * @param iLen          Number of bytes to be processed in <code>in</code>, starting at <code>iOff</code>.
    * @param lineLen       Line length for the output data. Should be a multiple of 4.
    * @param lineSeparator The line separator to be used to separate the output lines.
    * @return              A String containing the Base64 encoded data, broken into lines.
    */
    public static String encodeLines (byte[] in, int iOff, int iLen, int lineLen, String lineSeparator) {
       int blockLen = (lineLen*3) / 4;
       if (blockLen <= 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException();
       int lines = (iLen+blockLen-1) / blockLen;
       int bufLen = ((iLen+2)/3)*4 + lines*lineSeparator.length();
       StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder(bufLen);
       int ip = 0;
       while (ip < iLen) {
          int l = Math.min(iLen-ip, blockLen);
          buf.append (encode(in, iOff+ip, l));
          buf.append (lineSeparator);
          ip += l; }
       return buf.toString(); }

    /**
    * Encodes a byte array into Base64 format.
    * No blanks or line breaks are inserted in the output.
    * @param in  An array containing the data bytes to be encoded.
    * @return    A character array containing the Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static char[] encode (byte[] in) {
       return encode(in, 0, in.length); }

    /**
    * Encodes a byte array into Base64 format.
    * No blanks or line breaks are inserted in the output.
    * @param in    An array containing the data bytes to be encoded.
    * @param iLen  Number of bytes to process in <code>in</code>.
    * @return      A character array containing the Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static char[] encode (byte[] in, int iLen) {
       return encode(in, 0, iLen); }

    /**
    * Encodes a byte array into Base64 format.
    * No blanks or line breaks are inserted in the output.
    * @param in    An array containing the data bytes to be encoded.
    * @param iOff  Offset of the first byte in <code>in</code> to be processed.
    * @param iLen  Number of bytes to process in <code>in</code>, starting at <code>iOff</code>.
    * @return      A character array containing the Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static char[] encode (byte[] in, int iOff, int iLen) {
       int oDataLen = (iLen*4+2)/3;       // output length without padding
       int oLen = ((iLen+2)/3)*4;         // output length including padding
       char[] out = new char[oLen];
       int ip = iOff;
       int iEnd = iOff + iLen;
       int op = 0;
       while (ip < iEnd) {
          int i0 = in[ip++] & 0xff;
          int i1 = ip < iEnd ? in[ip++] & 0xff : 0;
          int i2 = ip < iEnd ? in[ip++] & 0xff : 0;
          int o0 = i0 >>> 2;
          int o1 = ((i0 &   3) << 4) | (i1 >>> 4);
          int o2 = ((i1 & 0xf) << 2) | (i2 >>> 6);
          int o3 = i2 & 0x3F;
          out[op++] = map1[o0];
          out[op++] = map1[o1];
          out[op] = op < oDataLen ? map1[o2] : '='; op++;
          out[op] = op < oDataLen ? map1[o3] : '='; op++; }
       return out; }

    /**
    * Decodes a string from Base64 format.
    * No blanks or line breaks are allowed within the Base64 encoded input data.
    * @param s  A Base64 String to be decoded.
    * @return   A String containing the decoded data.
    * @throws   IllegalArgumentException If the input is not valid Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static String decodeString (String s) {
       return new String(decode(s)); }

    /**
    * Decodes a byte array from Base64 format and ignores line separators, tabs and blanks.
    * CR, LF, Tab and Space characters are ignored in the input data.
    * This method is compatible with <code>sun.misc.BASE64Decoder.decodeBuffer(String)</code>.
    * @param s  A Base64 String to be decoded.
    * @return   An array containing the decoded data bytes.
    * @throws   IllegalArgumentException If the input is not valid Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static byte[] decodeLines (String s) {
       char[] buf = new char[s.length()];
       int p = 0;
       for (int ip = 0; ip < s.length(); ip++) {
          char c = s.charAt(ip);
          if (c != ' ' && c != '\r' && c != '\n' && c != '\t')
             buf[p++] = c; }
       return decode(buf, 0, p); }

    /**
    * Decodes a byte array from Base64 format.
    * No blanks or line breaks are allowed within the Base64 encoded input data.
    * @param s  A Base64 String to be decoded.
    * @return   An array containing the decoded data bytes.
    * @throws   IllegalArgumentException If the input is not valid Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static byte[] decode (String s) {
       return decode(s.toCharArray()); }

    /**
    * Decodes a byte array from Base64 format.
    * No blanks or line breaks are allowed within the Base64 encoded input data.
    * @param in  A character array containing the Base64 encoded data.
    * @return    An array containing the decoded data bytes.
    * @throws    IllegalArgumentException If the input is not valid Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static byte[] decode (char[] in) {
       return decode(in, 0, in.length); }

    /**
    * Decodes a byte array from Base64 format.
    * No blanks or line breaks are allowed within the Base64 encoded input data.
    * @param in    A character array containing the Base64 encoded data.
    * @param iOff  Offset of the first character in <code>in</code> to be processed.
    * @param iLen  Number of characters to process in <code>in</code>, starting at <code>iOff</code>.
    * @return      An array containing the decoded data bytes.
    * @throws      IllegalArgumentException If the input is not valid Base64 encoded data.
    */
    public static byte[] decode (char[] in, int iOff, int iLen) {
       if (iLen%4 != 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Length of Base64 encoded input string is not a multiple of 4.");
       while (iLen > 0 && in[iOff+iLen-1] == '=') iLen--;
       int oLen = (iLen*3) / 4;
       byte[] out = new byte[oLen];
       int ip = iOff;
       int iEnd = iOff + iLen;
       int op = 0;
       while (ip < iEnd) {
          int i0 = in[ip++];
          int i1 = in[ip++];
          int i2 = ip < iEnd ? in[ip++] : 'A';
          int i3 = ip < iEnd ? in[ip++] : 'A';
          if (i0 > 127 || i1 > 127 || i2 > 127 || i3 > 127)
             throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Illegal character in Base64 encoded data.");
          int b0 = map2[i0];
          int b1 = map2[i1];
          int b2 = map2[i2];
          int b3 = map2[i3];
          if (b0 < 0 || b1 < 0 || b2 < 0 || b3 < 0)
             throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Illegal character in Base64 encoded data.");
          int o0 = ( b0       <<2) | (b1>>>4);
          int o1 = ((b1 & 0xf)<<4) | (b2>>>2);
          int o2 = ((b2 &   3)<<6) |  b3;
          out[op++] = (byte)o0;
          if (op<oLen) out[op++] = (byte)o1;
          if (op<oLen) out[op++] = (byte)o2; }
       return out; }

    // Dummy constructor.
    private Base64Coder() {}
}
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As an alternative to sun.misc.BASE64Decoder or non-core libraries, look at javax.mail.internet.MimeUtility.decode().

An example : Encode/Decode to/from Base64

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3  
javax.mail is not part of the core. –  Adam Goode Oct 15 '09 at 16:23
    
javax.mail.internet.MimeUtility included in appengine-api.jar –  diyism Dec 5 '11 at 4:45

Another late answer, but my benchmarking shows that Jetty's implementation of Base64 encoder is pretty fast. Not as fast as MiGBase64 but faster than iHarder Base64.

import org.eclipse.jetty.util.B64Code;

final String decoded = B64Code.decode(encoded, "UTF-8");

I also did some benchmarks:

      library     |    encode    |    decode   
------------------+--------------+-------------
 'MiGBase64'      |  10146001.00 |  6426446.00
 'Jetty B64Code'  |   8846191.00 |  3101361.75
 'iHarder Base64' |   3259590.50 |  2505280.00
 'Commons-Codec'  |    241318.04 |   255179.96

These are runs/sec so higher is better.

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If You are prefering performance based solution then you can use "MiGBase64"

http://migbase64.sourceforge.net/

public class Base64Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    String encodeToString = Base64.encodeToString("JavaTips.net".getBytes(), true);
    System.out.println("encodeToString " + encodeToString);
    byte[] decodedBytes = Base64.decode(encodeToString.getBytes());
    System.out.println("decodedBytes " + new String(decodedBytes));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
MiGBase64 is easy to use, well coded and blazing fast. Nice find, Imby. –  mcaesar Jul 8 '12 at 7:10
    
According to this benchmark MiGBase64 is not the fastest implementation anymore, and now it lags behind both Apache Commons and sun.misc.BASE64Decoder significantly. –  Andrea Mar 22 '13 at 22:13

FYI: JEP 135 proposes to introduce a standard, discoverable API for this in the Java platform.

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This is a late answer, but Joshua Bloch committed his Base64 class (when he was working for Sun, ahem, Oracle) under the java.util.prefs package. This class existed since JDK 1.4.

E.g.

String currentString = "Hello World";
String base64String = java.util.prefs.Base64.byteArrayToBase64(currentString.getBytes("UTF-8"));
share|improve this answer
11  
Unfortunately the Base64 class has default visibility, so it's hardly public API. –  Glyn Normington Oct 20 '11 at 15:02
    
Why not just refer to java.util.Base64 –  Lukas Eder Apr 30 at 12:18
    
@LukasEder, that's because java.util.Base64 was released in JDK 8 (and higher). It doesn't exist on earlier releases. –  Buhake Sindi Apr 30 at 12:30
    
I'm sorry, I missed that point –  Lukas Eder Apr 30 at 13:07
import com.sun.org.apache.xml.internal.security.utils.Base64;
String str="Hello World";
String base64_str=Base64.encode(str.getBytes("UTF-8"));

Or:

String str="Hello World";
String base64_str="";
try
   {base64_str=(String)Class.forName("java.util.prefs.Base64").getDeclaredMethod("byteArrayToBase64", new Class[]{byte[].class}).invoke(null, new Object[]{str.getBytes("UTF-8")});
   }
catch (Exception ee) {}

java.util.prefs.Base64 works on local rt.jar,

but it is not in http://code.google.com/appengine/docs/java/jrewhitelist.html

and not in http://blog.stringbuffer.com/2009/04/available-classes-in-google-app-enginej.html

What a pity!

PS. In android, it's easy because that android.util.Base64 has been included since Android API Level 8.

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protected by Brad Larson Oct 15 '12 at 17:07

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