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I want to make a program that does an order entry system for beverages. ( i will probably do description, cost)

I want to use the Decorator pattern and the observer pattern. I made a UML drawing and saved it as a pic for easy viewing. This site wont let me upload as a word doc so i have to upload a pic - i hope its easily viewable....

I need to know if i am doing the UML / design patterns correctly before moving on to the coding part.

Beverage is my abstract component class. Espresso, houseblend, darkroast are my concrete subject classes..

I also have a condiment decorator class milk,mocha,soy,whip. would be my observer? because they would be interested in data changes to cost?

Now, would the espresso,houseblend etc, be my SUBJECT and the condiments be my observer? My theory is that Cost is a changes and that the condiments need to know the changes?

So, subject = esspresso,houseblend,darkroast,etc.. // they hold cost()

Observer = milk,mocha,soy,whip? // they hold cost()

would be the concrete components and the milk,mocha,soy,whip? would be the decorator!

So, following good software engineering practices "design to an interface and not implementation" or "identify things that change from those that dont"

would i need a costbehavior interface?

If you look at the UML you will see where i am going with this and see if i am implementing observer + Decorator pattern correctly? I think the decorator is correct.


since, the pic is not very viewable i will detail the classes here:

Beverage class(register observer, remove observer, notify observer, description)

these classes are the concrete beverage classes

espresso, houseblend,darkroast, decaf(cost,getdescription,setcost,costchanged)

interface observer class(update) // cost?

interface costbehavior class(cost) // since this changes?

condiment decorator class( getdescription)

concrete classes that are linked to the 2 interface s and decorator are: milk,mocha,soy,whip(cost,getdescription,update) these are my decorator/ wrapper classes.

Thank you..

alt text

Is there a way to make this picture bigger?

share|improve this question
    
+1 Well formed question around a complex subject. Perhaps more complex than it needs to be :) –  El Ronnoco Jan 15 '11 at 0:02
    
Please don't take this the wrong way, but I think the first mistake is saying you want to use specific design patterns to solve a problem. You should choose design patterns that fit the solution, not solutions that fit the design pattern... –  pero Jan 15 '11 at 1:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can see decorator comes into play here, but I am not too sure about using observer here. It seems forced.

Several things:

  1. CondimentDecorator need to a have a beverage to decorate. It doesn't show in your UML. Think of it as a wrapper around something, similar to Adapter pattern. A wrapper need something to wrap on. You clearly didn't show that.
  2. On your cost behavior interface, why would the concrete decorators implemented it, but the concrete beverages do not, and yet, the beverage has cost also in it? I'd just have beverage interface inherit from cost behavior interface and be done with it.
  3. #2 also applies to the getDescription method... create an IDescribable? or something and have beverage implement that. Decorator will get it through inheritance.
  4. You need to convince me why would a condiment need to know when the price change? At the moment, this seems a bit forced to me. I don't see how observer is needed here (logically / design-wise). It seems to me that you want to force an observer pattern into this design for no good reason other than you must have it. This is a classic pattern gung-ho thing for someone that just learn about design pattern. Not trying to be offensive, just stating the fact. I was once such a person as well :).

My suggestion is to read up again on the Head First Design Pattern book (which I think where you get this examples :), very similar domain) and get a better understanding on both patterns and when to use them.

Below is an example of decorator and observer working together. The drink combination is an implementation of decorator. The ordering system is an observer (where the order will notify the pager and the pager will do something). The scenario here is a StarBuck coffee shop where they'll give you a pager so you can go around doing something while your drink is being processed and you will get notified by the pager once the drink is ready.

Save the sample as drink.cs and you can easily compile this using csc ( C:\Windows\Microsoft.Net\Framework\v3....\csc /target:exe /out:drink.exe drink.cs) and run it or use VS or whatever :).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public interface IBeverage
{
  string GetDescription();
  decimal GetCost();
}

public abstract class Beverage : IBeverage
{
  protected string _name;
  protected decimal _cost;

  public Beverage(string name, decimal cost)
  {
     _name = name;
     _cost = cost;
  }

  public virtual string GetDescription()
  {
    return _name;
  }

  public virtual decimal GetCost()
  {
    return _cost;
  }
}

public class Macchiato : Beverage
{
  public Macchiato() : base("Macchiato", 3.50m) {}
}

public abstract class BeverageDecorator : Beverage
{
  IBeverage _baseBeverage;

  public BeverageDecorator(IBeverage baseBeverage) : base("", 0m)
  {
    _baseBeverage = baseBeverage;
  }

  public override string GetDescription()
  {
    return _name + " " + _baseBeverage.GetDescription();
  }

  public override decimal GetCost()
  {
    return _cost + _baseBeverage.GetCost();
  }
}

public class Caramel : BeverageDecorator
{
  public Caramel(IBeverage baseBeverage) : base(baseBeverage) 
  {
     _name = "Caramel";
     _cost = 0.50m;
  }
}

public class Venti : BeverageDecorator
{
  public Venti(IBeverage baseBeverage) : base(baseBeverage)
  {
     _name = "Venti";
     _cost = 1.00m;
  }
}

public class Iced : BeverageDecorator
{
  public Iced(IBeverage baseBeverage) : base(baseBeverage)
  {
    _name = "Iced";
    _cost = 0.25m;
  }
}

public class Order
{
  IBeverage _beverage;
  IPager _pager;

  public Order(IBeverage beverage, IPager pager)
  {
    _beverage = beverage;
    _pager = pager;
  }

  public IPager Pager
  {
    get { return _pager; }
  }

  public IBeverage Beverage
  {
    get { return _beverage; }
  }
}

public class OrderProcessing
{
    Queue<Order> orders = new Queue<Order>();

    public void NewOrder(IBeverage beverage, IPager pager)
    {
      orders.Enqueue(new Order(beverage, pager));
    }

    public void ProcessOrder()
    {
      if (orders.Count > 0)
      {
        var order = orders.Dequeue();
        order.Pager.Update(order);
      }
    }
}

public interface IPager
{
  void Update(Order order);
}

public class VibratingPager : IPager
{
  string _number;

  public VibratingPager(string number)
  {
    _number = number;
  }

  public void Update(Order order)
  {
    Console.WriteLine("BUZZZ");
    Console.WriteLine("Your {0} is ready.  Please pay {1} at the cashier after picking it up.", order.Beverage.GetDescription(),order.Beverage.GetCost());
  }
}

public class Program
{
  public static void Main(string[] args)
  {  
    var orders = new OrderProcessing();
    var pager1 = new VibratingPager("1");
    var pager2 = new VibratingPager("2");    

    orders.NewOrder(new Iced(new Venti(new Caramel(new Macchiato()))), pager1);
    orders.NewOrder(new Venti(new Macchiato()), pager2);

    orders.ProcessOrder();
    orders.ProcessOrder();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I did get this examples from that Book. I thought about using a menu as an observer but thought that was a bad idea. I see its not. So, i am taking your advice. I dont think i need a cost behavior. So, instead i added a display behavior instead was this a smart move? –  icelated Jan 15 '11 at 5:06
    
Eh... it's easier for me to show you an example of decorator and observer working together than explain them in comment. See my edited answer w/ the example above... –  Jimmy Chandra Jan 15 '11 at 7:06
    
In the example, IPager is abstract base for the observer. The subject is actually the Order class, but in my version. Most of the responsibility in the original Subject (like Attach, Detach, and Notify) is assumed by the OrderProcessing class. Where ProcessOrder method is used for Notifying the observer (pager) and the Attach responsibility is assumed by NewOrder method. A bit different flavor, but it's an implementation of observer nonetheless. –  Jimmy Chandra Jan 15 '11 at 7:19
    
This is a good working example that helps me understand better. thanks for taking the time to help me. –  icelated Jan 16 '11 at 0:57
    
What if i wanted to add a new product like a donut how could i make this work? would i have to replicate the first design? could it be the same observer but a different wrapper? –  icelated Jan 16 '11 at 17:07

I am definitely not a design pattern expert but I feel here that you are making this more complex than it needs to be. Also, I'm no UML expert but is it that you have each of your coffee types as a separate class? I think it would make more sense to have a beverage class with a type property/attribute and then to inject a 'cost-detail' class into this which will allow these beverages to report correct prices.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason why i have the types as a separate class is they are concrete. What happens when i need to add a new type? i am thinking in design to an interface and not implementation. its easy to expand without changing code. –  icelated Jan 15 '11 at 1:20

No. It's not right at all. Sorry, but it isn't. That drawing says that EVERYTHING is a beverage, in some cases many times over. Clearly some of those white triangles should be diamonds, most of them probably black. The only relationship you've used is inheritance and it's obviously not your intention.

I also have serious problems with the design idea, period, but I guess that's for another discussion. Nothing you've done is out of ordinary for someone just starting with design (everyone starts out seriously overdesinging every damn thing), so I wouldn't feel bad about it though. At least you're thinking about design, and that's a pretty darn good thing.


Reply to comment:

Nothing, when applied where it's needed. Quite a bit when it's applied where it's not. It's simply not needed here. Furthermore, you'd be doing it wrong. Cream is not a decorator for coffee (I think that's what you're trying to do) Coffee with cream could be...but that's still overdesign.

A decorator adds behavior to the thing it's decorating. Say you had a message class and a print function that displayed the output:

struct message
{
  virtual void print() = 0;
};

struct concrete_message : message
{
  void print() { std::cout << my_message << std::endl; }
};

Now lets say you wanted to have some of them indented. You could do that by using a "decorator", which subclasses AND contains a message:

struct tabbed_message
{
  tabbed_message(message * msg) : my_message(msg) {}
  void print() { std::cout << "\t; my_message->print(); }
};

See how that changes the behavior of any concrete message without having to change the original?

What you've got with your coffee/condiment thing isn't like this. Condiments are just things you put in coffee. There's no difference in behavior between a cup of coffee with or without cream (for example). If you want to charge for cream added then you simply associate it with the cup of coffee and run a total when you ask the cup how much it is.

share|improve this answer
    
Whats wrong with the decorator pattern? –  icelated Jan 15 '11 at 1:17
    
comment to be put in edit. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 15 '11 at 1:28

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