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I just want an opinion on the proper usage or a proper design with regards to using SqlConnection object. Which of the 2 below is the best use:

A data provider class whose methods (each of them) contain SqlConnection object (and disposed when done). Like:

IList<Employee> GetAllEmployees() 
{ 
  using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(this.connectionString)) { 
  // Code goes here... 
  } 
} 

Employee GetEmployee(int id) 
{ 
  using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(this.connectionString)) { 
  // Code goes here... 
  } 
}   

or

SqlConnection connection; // initialized in constructor 
IList<Employee> GetAllEmployees() 
{ 
  this.TryOpenConnection(); // tries to open member SqlConnection instance 
  // Code goes here... 
  this.CloseConnection(); 
  // return 
} 

Employee GetEmployee(int id) 
{ 
  this.TryOpenConnection(); // tries to open member SqlConnection instance 
  // Code goes here... 
  this.CloseConnection(); 
  // return 
}

Or is there a better approach than this? I have a focused web crawler type of application and this application will crawl 50 or more websites simultaneously (multithreaded) with each website contained in a crawler object and each crawler object has an instance of a data provider class (above).

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1  
BTW, this has nothing to do with C#. SqlConnection is part of .NET, not part of C# –  John Saunders Jan 15 '11 at 2:44
    
Right, I thought putting C# will let others know that my code sample is in C#. Anyways, thanks. –  Jojo Jan 15 '11 at 2:50
    
that's what the C# tag is for. Besides, anyone who looks at the code can see it's C#. –  John Saunders Jan 15 '11 at 2:53
    
Thanks @John. I thought the tags are used in searching. Anyways, thanks a lot for your thoughts. It's really helpful. Hey, you're from US and you're still awake. :) –  Jojo Jan 15 '11 at 3:01
    
it wasn't "still awake", it was "awake again". Tags are used both for searching, and filtering, and for information. –  John Saunders Jan 18 '11 at 19:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The actual database connections will be pooled. As long as all of your SqlConnection instances use the same connection string, they'll all really use the same connection.

I find it cleaner to create the connection instance, use it, then dispose it (in a using block). That way, if the code needs to change to use a different connection string, to use a transaction, or whatever, you have all you need to make the change available right there.

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I just thought that if there are more than 100 websites crawled and access the database (this is just a single database but each website is related to a single table), more than 100 connections can be possibly made (and was it 100 is the default of a pool size?). Heck, why am I lazy :(. –  Jojo Jan 15 '11 at 2:54
    
@Jojo: it won't be 100 connections, just 100 SqlConnection instances. There will probably be only a single connection. Besides, the better way to do this is to make the code work first, and optimize second. –  John Saunders Jan 15 '11 at 2:54

Maybe not really related, but the only time I'd separate any connection object to the class instance level is when I want to create a clear separation of concern to what each method is doing... Perhaps it's too long and need to be refactored into several pieces and each of them need to operate on the same connection as part of a transaction.

I.e.

Create a connection
Start transaction
Call a subroutine to update an order header (passing along the connection or get it from the instance)
Call a subroutine to update all order details (passing along the conneciton or get it from the instance)
End transaction
Close connection

Otherwise, I'd pretty much stick to option 1. W/ connection pooling it's basically won't cost you anything.

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